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Edited by Whitney Blankenship

Teaching the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1948–1976 will provide readers with critical content knowledge of lesser known figures and events in the 20th century Civil Rights Movement. As the initial volume in the Teaching Critical Themes in American History series, the book will also fulfill the aim of the series, which is to provide teachers with history content, pedagogical strategies, and teaching resources organized around key themes in American history and critical topics on which they might want to concentrate.

In Teaching the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1948–1976, traditional civil rights narratives are expanded through the use of an intersectional lens within historical analysis essays that provide additional context to the larger civil rights movements of the period. The pedagogical issues essays focus on common concerns and disputes that often surround the teaching of civil rights. Lesson plans and related resources addressing the topics highlighted by chapter authors are also included in the book. Social studies and history methods professors and curriculum coordinators will find the book helpful for introducing the teaching of civil rights movements. Pre-service and in-service educators can use the lesson plans and resources as models for their own units of study.

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The Social Foundations Reader

Critical Essays on Teaching, Learning and Leading in the 21st Century

Edited by Eleanor Blair and Yolanda Medina

The Social Foundations Reader is meant for undergraduate and graduate students in introductory foundations of education classes. No other contemporary reader provides such a broad and yet critical view of the issues typically addressed in an introductory foundations course. Instead, most provide a generic and typically conservative perspective on schools and classrooms and do little to encourage students to consider the important roles of critical theory and social justice in the creation of school environments that are responsive to issues of equity and diversity. This book provides a different lens through which students can view what happens in twenty-first-century schools while also considering the perspectives of multiple constituencies: parents, teachers, students and communities. The reader of this text is exposed to a wide range of scholarship in the foundations of education; essays range from the more traditional work of John Dewey to the controversial ideas of Henry Giroux. Contested topics associated with teaching, learning and leading in contemporary public schools are considered within a context where grappling with the answers to fundamental questions that will ultimately guide meaningful school reform is an essential part of becoming an educator. Each of the five sections in the book is accompanied by an introduction and summary/reflection questions to both guide reading and challenge students to think critically about how to synthesize and apply the ideas being presented.
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Teachers for the South

Pedagogy and Educationists in the University of Tennessee, 1844-1995

Clinton Allison

The latest cycle of national educational critiques and reforms has created an interest in gaining historical leverage on teacher education. With a broad audience in mind, Professor Allison provides a case study of the work of teacher educators in the academy and the «field.» He critically examines educationists' scholarship, status in the university, service to school and teachers, and impulse to engage in social reform. This is the first book-length study of the history of teacher education in the South.
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Telling the Stories

Essays on American Indian Literatures and Cultures

Elizabeth Hoffman Nelson and Malcolm A Nelson

Telling the Stories brings together thirteen important statements on major issues of American Indian identities and literatures. Some of the authors tell their stories and those of their people; others give scholarly attention to the most important contemporary Indian authors, such as Sherman Alexie, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, and James Welch. Thus the book replicates the dynamic process of the ever-changing stories of the American Indian peoples.
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Narratives of Social Justice Teaching

How English Teachers Negotiate Theory and Practice Between Preservice and Inservice Spaces

sj Miller, Laura Bolf Beliveau, Peggy Rice and David Kirkland

This book documents how preservice and inservice English teachers negotiate the transfer of the social justice pedagogies they learn in university methods classes to their own work as beginning full-time teachers. Based on a set of teacher narratives, this critical and evidence-based view of English teachers’ interpretations of, responses to, and embodiments of social justice explores the complex shifts and concessions that English teachers often make when transitioning between preservice and inservice spaces – shifts which cause teachers to embrace and negotiate a social justice agenda in their classrooms, or for some, to modify, or even abandon it altogether. This work also offers a fresh perspective on the specific, context-dependent pathways and mechanisms through which English teachers enter school culture and respond to their own racial, sexual, and financial positions in relation to the gendered, raced, and classed positions of their schools, students, and classrooms. The book will be useful to social justice researchers, English teacher educators, inservice and preservice teachers, policymakers, cross-disciplinary teacher education fields, and interdisciplinary audiences, particularly in the fields of anthropology, sociology of education, philosophy, and cultural studies.
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Strangers in the Land

Pedagogy, Modernity, and Jewish Identity

H. Svi Shapiro

The postmodern moment has meant an unprecedented acknowledgment of the importance of difference and the «other» in the constitution of human identity. Astonishingly, within critical educational studies this has not, till now, included a serious concern with Jews as either an oppressed or a marginalized group. For the first time, in this anthology, a number of leading voices in the field address the nature of Jewish experience and its connections to a radical vision for social and educational change. Bringing together both biography and social theory, the authors explore the «pedagogy» of Jewish experience, in its variety and complexity, and its connections to the transformative or critical visions they hold of education and our world.
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Undoing Whiteness in the Classroom

Critical Educultural Teaching Approaches for Social Justice Activism

Virginia Lea and Erma Jean Sims

At the start of the twenty-first century, government mandates and corporate practices are resulting in growing inequities in the U.S. educational field. Many view this as being driven by whiteness hegemony. Undoing Whiteness in the Classroom is a comprehensive effort to bring together, in one volume, educultural practices and teaching strategies that deconstruct whiteness hegemony, empower individuals to develop critical consciousness, and inspire them to engage in social justice activism. Through music, the visual and performing arts, narrative, and dialogue, educulturalism opens us up to becoming more aware of the oppressive cultural and institutional forces that make up whiteness hegemony. Educulturalism allows us to identify how whiteness hegemony functions to obscure the power, privilege, and practices of the dominant social elite, and reproduce inequities and inequalities within education and wider society.
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Reading African American Experiences in the Obama Era

Theory, Advocacy, Activism- With a foreword by Marc Lamont Hill and an afterword by Zeus Leonardo

Ebony Elizabeth Thomas and Shanesha R.F. Brooks-Tatum

What does it mean to be Black in the Obama era? In Reading African American Experiences in the Obama Era, young African American scholars and researchers and experienced community activists demonstrate how to encourage dialogue across curricula, disciplines, and communities with emphases on education, new media, and popular culture. Considering what this historic moment means for Black life, letters, and learning, this accessible yet scholarly volume encourages movement toward thoughtful analysis today.
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A Different View of Urban Schools

Civil Rights, Critical Race Theory, and Unexplored Realities

Kitty Kelly Epstein

The revised edition of A Different View of Urban Schools updates a unique story about the realities of urban education in America and provides new insights on the origin of urban education issues; the route to a diverse and effective teaching force; and the impact of federal legislation and corporate involvement on urban schools. Dr. Epstein’s analysis of problems is fascinating; her program for the creation of joyful engaging education is equally impressive. The result is a new perspective on what educational reform requires in American cities. This book will be useful to teachers, policy makers, school board members, and parents as well as in classes in multicultural education, ethnic studies, and the social foundations of education.
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The Evolving Significance of Race

Living, Learning, and Teaching

Sherick A. Hughes and Theodora Regina Berry

This book won the 2014 AESA (American Educational Studies Association) Critics Choice Award.

We are living, learning, and teaching by questioning how to address race in a society that consistently prefers to see itself as colorblind, a society claiming to seek a «post-racial» existence. This edited volume offers evidence of the evolving significance of race from a diverse group of male and female contributors selfidentifying as Black, Latino, Asian, White, Gay, Lesbian, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim. Our attempts to provide every child and adult learner with what they need – equity – to make the most of their educational experiences – excellence – are still consciously and unconsciously thwarted by the ingrained nature of racism in our society. This point becomes obvious when we begin teaching those audiences that represent diverse lived experiences of race about the changing significance of race and how to develop a more critical, reflexive lens focused upon the politics of race. This book invites readers to co-construct and implement a critical race pedagogy that reflects both an acknowledgment of the evolving significance of race and opportunities for hope via education.