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used and created as places for fantasy or role-playing games. The fantasy worlds and virtual places of these Multi User Dungeons provide a key part of the vocabulary for defining the web as cyberspace. Where the BBS was a communication medium, the web was taking on characteristics from these virtual fantasy worlds. Spirituality in cyberspace. Some of the discussion of online community in the books of the late 1990s seems contemporary, but some of it already reads as particularly dated. Karla Shelton and Todd McNeeley begin their book by asking: Where is online

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. ———. Media Rituals: A Critical Approach . London: Routledge, 2003. ———. Media, Society, World: Social Theory and Digital Media Practice . London: Polity, 2012. Craig, Robert T. “Communication Theory as a Field.” Communication Theory 9, no. 2 (1999): 199–161. 10.1111/j.1468-2885.1999.tb00355.x. Crawford, Alice. “The Myth of the Unmarked Net Speaker.” In Critical Perspectives on the Internet , edited by Greg Elmer, 89-104. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002. Curran, James. “The New Revisionism in Mass Communication Research: A Reappraisal.” European Journal of

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. In order to propose a mechanism appropriate for modeling trust between collaborating partners, the conditions for trust building and management need to be analyzed first. The construction of any model within this research program will be possible by following a meta-analysis method to “guesstimate” cause-effect relationships, in regards to a critical-realistic philosophical perspective. When trying to construct a model and “reduce” a perceived reality of IS systems, the research encompasses and gives importance to social interactions. These interactions are assumed

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findings based on the pre-existing scholarship of Adamkiewicz. As previously mentioned, the Internet has become a space in which the rheto- ric of racial injustice simmers (e.g., Bristor, Lee, and Hunt 1995; Campelo, Aitken, and Gnoth 2011). Simultaneously, the online medium has become a multi-billion-dollar advertising space in contemporary culture (Miller 2011) due to its accessibility to diverse publics. One of the modes of plantation heritage advertising is through interactive virtual tours, giving the tourist an opportunity to explore constructed spaces

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provides a fascinating insight into how this important social network itself is being used, but also continues a tradition of platform-specific studies—cover- ing blogs (Bruns & Jacobs, 2006), social networking sites (boyd & Ellison, 2007), virtual worlds (Meadows, 2007), search engines (Halavais, 2009; Lewandowski, 2012), Wikipedia (Lih, 2009; Reagle, 2010), YouTube (Burgess & Green, 2009), and many others—which document the social co-construction of new media technologies in the often conflicted interplay between platform users, platform providers, and other

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construction of active, meaningful and student-centered learning models. Rivero and Mur (2015) have established three groups of Web 2.0 resources that stand out for their didactic utility in the Social Sciences classroom: cooperative/collaborative writing applications, such as wikis and blogs; material repositories that can be built by students (YouTube, Instagram, Picassa, Google Drive, etc.); and spaces for communication between users, such as virtual worlds or social networks. Miralles, Gómez and Monteagudo (2019) point out as main advantages of the use of ICTs for the

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signification shifted elsewhere, a gap opened up between, for instance, virtual wages based on a wider world, and the realities of life lived in Ireland. Sustaining this particular fiction could not continue and has all but collapsed. 7 See Republic of Ireland, Constitution, Articles 1–3. <http://www.maths.tcd.ie/pub/ Constitution/Articles 1–3.html>. 8 See P. J. Mathews, ‘In Praise of “Hibernocentricism”: Republicanism, Globalisation and Irish Culture’, The Republic, 4 ( June 2005), pp. 7–14. Living in a Global World: Making Sense of Place in This Side of Brightness 49 It

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that the contemporary structure and condition of the social bond is affected by the phenomena occurring both in the real world and in cyberspace. As Magdalena Szpunar argues, three types of contact may be identified to illustrate the relations between the real and the virtual world. The first type refers to relations initiated and continued in the virtual world. The second one encompasses contacts forged in the virtual environment that eventually go beyond cyberspace (e.g. face-to-face meetings). The third type are bonds forged in the real world for which the virtual

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Benedict Anderson (1983/1991) argued, audiences are largely “imagined communities” in the case of mediated communication. There is no stable mass of listeners—even for major events such as broadcasts of the Olympics and the Super Bowl; audiences are but temporary assemblies in physical or virtual space. Furthermore, and very important, even when audiences exist, contemporary analyses such as that by Nicholas Abercrombie and Brian Longhurst (1998) in Audiences: A Sociological Theory of Performance and Imagination and Andy Ruddock’s (2007) Investigating Audiences show

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, sponsors colloquia, and is home to an International Fellowship Program which brings to Oxford University midcareer journalists from around the world to focus on an area of research. Since its establishment in 1983, the Fellowship Program has supported over 600 journalists from 94 countries (University of Oxford Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, 2017a). b) Research: Recent and current projects include “Bias, Bullshit and Lies: Audience Perspectives on Low Trust in the Media”; “Digital-Born and Legacy News Media on Twitter during the UK General Election