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. 4. A moral obligation to articulate a counterhegemonic vision or narrative of hope regarding education. 5. A determination to move from rhetoric to civil rights activism. (p. 23) Are Social Justice Initiatives Part of a Radical Social Agenda ? However it is defined or conceptualized, some respond to the term social justice as though it were an expletive, an idea that has no place in either the preparation of school educators or in-school practices, and they want to delete it from formal guidelines that shape objectives and goals, drive school policy, and

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Possibilities in Practice

Social Justice Teaching in the Disciplines

Edited by Summer Melody Pennell, Ashley S. Boyd, Hillary Parkhouse and Alison LaGarry

This edited collection illustrates different possibilities for social justice practice in various grade levels, disciplines, and interdisciplinary spaces in P–12 education. Chapters in this unique volume demonstrate teaching with a critical lens, helping students develop critical dispositions, encouraging civic action with students, and teaching about topics inclusive of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Based on empirical research, each contribution is rooted in a critical theoretical framework and characterizes findings from sustained study of pedagogic practice, spanning subject matter from social studies, English Language Arts, music, mathematics, and science. Through this work, both pre- and in-service teachers as well as teacher educators will be inspired to practice social justice in their own classrooms.

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marriage maintenance, though there has been some debate as to the role of distributive justice in married partners’ decisions to maintain their relationships (Canary & Stafford, 1992, 2007; Ragsdale & Brandau-Brown, 2005, 2007; Stafford & Canary, 2006). In addition, it has been suggested that procedural justice is the key component in analyzing whether any given dispute resolution is just (Thibaut & Walker, 1975). ← 75 | 76 → The focus of this essay is to examine couples’ interpersonal forgiveness narratives (one type of relational maintenance strategy; Fincham, Hall

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Relational and Responsive Inclusion | BER RYM AN , N EVIN , SO O H O O , FO R D , ED S. PETER LA N G 1 www.peterlang.com Socially unjust circumstances continue to perpetuate inadequate classroom, school and system-level responses to longstanding social justice imperatives, shutting out power- sharing solutions to educational disparities and marginalizing populations of Indigenous and minoritized peoples. To address these educational disparities, this book proposes a relational and culturally responsive framework, from within a critical and indigenous

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formation and problem resolution . New York: W. W. Norton. Welker, L. (2007). Staging Sudanese refugee narratives and the legacy of genocide. In L. R. Frey & K. M. Carragee (Eds.), C ommunication activism: Vol. 3: Struggling for social justice amidst difference (pp. 139–178). New York: Hampton Press. Westheimer, J., & Kahne, J. (2007). Introduction. Equity & Excellence in Education, 40 :2, 97–100. Wilson, S. R., & Gettings, P. E. (2012). Nurturing children as assets: A positive approach to preventing child maltreatment and promoting healthy youth development. In T. J

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«How Do We Know They Know?»

A conversation about pre-service teachers learning about culture and social justice

R. Deborah Davis, Arcenia London and Barbara Beyerbach

Teacher education programs are charged with educating teachers to teach all students – preparing them to teach multiethnic, multiracial, multilingual, and differently-abled students in an increasingly global, inter-dependent world. This book takes as its starting point the assumption that pre-service teacher candidates, primarily white and middle-class, come to college to pursue a teaching degree having little if any experience of a social nature with persons not like themselves. Rooted in areas of theory and practice and based around the «Schools and Society» and «Culturally Relevant Teaching» courses required by the Teacher Education Program social justice conceptual framework, «How Do We Know They Know?» is a conversation about ways to assess these pre-service teachers’ growth and movement, as they progress from naiveté to awareness about the realities of culture in schools.
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the Middle Passage to Black Lives Matter is a narrative of social justice that seeks to raise the reader’s historical consciousness and provide authentic strategies to decolonize the global curriculum. Marva McClean is a public school educator and teacher-researcher who utilizes a social justice platform to engage teachers and students in col- laborative inquiry that creates spaces of empowerment and transfor- mation. Dr. McClean’s research focuses on social justice and equity in education, the sociology of middle school, transnationalism and post- colonial

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Contributors           Contributors Njoki Nathani Wane , Ph.D. (University of Toronto), is Special Advisor on Status of Women at University of Toronto and Professor in the Department of Humanities, Social Science, Social Justice Education at the OISE, University of Toronto. From 2009–2012, she was Director of the Office of Teachers Support at OISE (OTSO). In 2009, she was one of the TVO nominees for Best Lecturer, while in 2008 she received the Harry Jerome Professional Excellence Award and in 2007 the African Women Achievement Award. For the last 20 years she

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. Digital Fusion is a sustained and integrated project that combines more than a decade of community participatory research in two regions of the United States. Using qualitative research methods and drawing from critical cultural studies and social theory, Digital Fusion is an interdisciplinary project that engages digital literacy and social justice issues related to race, ethnicity, language, class, and education. Thought-provoking, multi-vocal, and multi-lingual narratives from racial and ethnic minorities as well as institutional administrators lay the groundwork

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Activist Art in Social Justice Pedagogy

Engaging Students in Glocal Issues Through the Arts, Revised Edition

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Edited by Barbara Beyerbach, R. Deborah Davis and Tania Ramalho

Artists have always had a role in imagining a more socially just, inclusive world—many have devoted their lives to realizing this possibility. In a culture ever more embedded in performance and the visual, examining the role of arts in multicultural teaching for social justice is a timely focus. In Activist Art in Social Justice Pedagogy approaches to using activist art to teach a multicultural curriculum are examined and critiqued. Examples of activist artists and their strategies illustrate how study of and engagement in activist art processes glocally—connecting local and global issues—can deepen critical literacy and commitment to social justice. This book is relevant to those (1) interested in teaching more about artist/activist social movements around the globe, (2) preparing pre-service teachers to teach for social justice, (3) concerned about learning how to engage diverse learners through the arts, (4) teaching courses related to arts-based multicultural education, critical literacy, and culturally relevant teaching. As we think more broadly we address the question "why does a ‘social justice through the arts in education’ approach make sense"; describe examples of preservice teacher assignments examining artists’ roles in activist movements, promoting multicultural understanding and social justice; and share approaches to and examples of using the arts in the United States and abroad to deepen multicultural comprehension and teaching for social justice.