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life be so diˆerent from humans that they are by de nition unrecognizable by human standards? e way that dialectical materialism linked material, natural, and social evolution as predictable stages along a continuum was a creative obstacle for contemporary SF writers – yet, in joining questions of evolution, labor, humanity, and alterity, it merely intensi es a thematic and conceptual constellation that is central to SF as such. Moreover, as Engels’ reception among some American biologists suggests, anthropomorphic determinism is not the only possible result

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1929. In this Part III, other, younger writers that bring their writing career to a close shortly after that date (Conrad), or long after it (Kipling), will be discussed in their entirety. Thus ‘up to 1921’ should be taken as meaning ‘before 1921’. In concrete terms this is a terminus a quo in twentieth-century British literature, and it is also, indicatively and symbolically, the year preceding Ulysses, The Waste Land, Jacob’s Room and Aaron’s Rod. These masterpieces inaugurate rather than close an era, and both they and their authors must necessarily remain

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Bellville (1905–1960), the wealthy heir to Papillon Hall in Leicestershire and dilettante, was an air pilot who volunteered for the Nationalists. He narrowly escaped the firing squad after landing at Santander airport shouting ‘Viva Franco!’ thinking that the town had already been conquered by the Nationalist forces. Even- tually he became a well-known bullfighting aficionado and torero (‘El Inglesito’), the first English bullfighter, as well as an adventurer, writer and journalist. He befriended the American correspondent Virginia Cowles (1910–83, author of the

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fiction, history is viewed again as a reliable tool for the coherent interpretation of the past. These novels offer their own ways of responding to the postmodern cultural aftermath and a changed understanding of historical consciousness which this book aims to analyze and theorize. Texts by African American, Asian American, Native American, and other ethnic minority writers are intentionally excluded from the research although the emergence of the cultural multivocality concept is largely owed to them. This large and powerful segment of American literature has

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‘Enoch Arden’ had made Tennyson the poet of the people, Idylls made him, as soon as the first series came out in 1859, the poet of the educated 5 The Irish internal affairs will be dealt with more fully in § 253. 6  Darkest England (1890), in which he denounced the miserable conditions of women forced into prostitution, and compared proletarian England with wildest Africa. 7  § 293.2. 14/I Part I The Victorian Twilight middle classes; but popular success was not matched by critical acclaim. Tennyson’s works aroused increasingly conditional and perplexed praise

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different sports events (Richert, 9-10). Despite the inconsistencies and descriptions that lack balance, Bryson’s sociologi- cal observations make The Lost Continent a relevant testimony of the times. Due to the salient facts, this travelogue is also a compelling documentary. Through the writer’s eyes we see Tuskegee, a milestone in African-American education in Alabama, where the majority of the population is black, which again, after reading Zora Neale Hurston, may remind the white reader what it means to be different. Moreover, Tuskegee is the seat of one of the

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it. That surely was something. […] What did he think of this country? It wasn’t one. It was a place that was still being made habitable. A venture, another example of the inextinguishable will of men and women to make room for themselves, some patch of the earth, however small, where they could stand up, feel the ground under their feet and say, This is mine, I have made it, I have made it mine. (60-61) An important word here is that of “ground.” The Conversations at Curlow Creek show that to make a place habitable, you have to draw boundaries4 but also

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the matter as regards this paper: American novel- ist Ron Hansen’s most recent novel, A Wild Surge of Guilty Passion (2011), in which the commission of crime and adultery engenders specifically religious guilt. In this respect, one only has to compare, say, James M. Cain’s treatment of the same data – the details behind the scandalous real-life case of 1927 which was called the trial of the century – in Double Indemnity (1943), to appreciate Hansen’s originality. The overall aim of the paper is to show how fruitful a faith-informed guilty conscience can be in

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-Second World War rise of the United States as the hegemonic center of global capitalism—would further fragment Eliot’s traditions, first along the lines of the nation-states (Eliot’s English literature becoming American, Irish, Scottish, Canadian, Nigerian literatures) and then into an increasing variety of configurations both within (African-American, Basque, Latino/a, Québécois) and across (West African, Latin American, women’s, queer) these nation-states. Williams concludes by pointing out that in his own moment the linked concepts of literature and the literary

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. Bauer, Pamela 1988 Walking on Sunshine. New York: Harlequin Books. Bauman, Zygmunt 2000 “Ethics of Individuals”, Canadian Journal of Sociology 25/1: 83-96. Baym, Nina 1993 Woman’s Fiction: A Guide to Novels by and about Women in America, 1820-70. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press. Beja, Morris 1989 “Farrington the Scrivener: A Story of Dame Street”, in: Morris Beja – Shari Benstock (eds.), 111-122. Beja, Morris – Shari Benstock (eds.) 1989 Coping with Joyce. Columbus, OH: The Ohio University Press. Bell, Michael Davitt 1996 The Problem