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: Peter Hammer Verlag, 2000. Habermas, Jürgen. Erkenntnis und Interesse . Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 6th edition, 1981. ← 306 | 307 → Hartwig, Jimmy. Ich bin ein Kämpfer geblieben. Meine Siege, meine Krisen, mein Leben . Berlin: Siebenhaar Verlag, 2010. Hügel-Marshall, Ika. Daheim unterwegs. Ein deutsches Leben . Frankfurt am Main: Fischer Taschenbuchverlag, 2001. Münster: Unrast Verlag, 2012. ——. Invisible Woman: Growing Up Black in Germany . Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2001. Kraft, Marion. The African Continuum and African-American Women Writers – Their

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song are (1) an acknowledgement of suppressing systems on poor youth and (2) an insertion of eschatological graspings. Eboni Marshall Turman is an Assistant Professor of Theology and African American Religion at Yale Divinity School. Her work converges on the intersections of womanist and feminist liberation theologies and ethics, Black radical ← 264 | 265 → traditions, Black women and theological liberalisms, Black womanist aesthetics and dogmatics in the African American Christian tradition (“Yale Divinity School”). She is also ordained in the National Baptist

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of their noxious colonial mix prompted Sylvie Rodier to name Maran “le pionnier malgré lui”. 335 The work’s forthright challenge to European civilisation undeniably opened the way for subsequent generations of black writers and scholars of African origin to voice their African-oriented opinion with pride and confidence. This, paradoxically, was so successful that the novel’s dispassionate objectivity was given an increasingly lukewarm and, at times, hostile reception by African and African-American commentators and critics in the decades that followed. It produced

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second Black German Studies Seminar, ‘Political Activism in the Black European Diaspora: From eory to Praxis’ Seminar, German Studies Association Conference, 1–4 October 2015, Washington, DC. See also Barbara Smith, ‘A Press of Our Own Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press’, Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies, 10/3 (1989): 11–13, where she discusses similar dynamics for African American women. Introduction: Rethinking Black German Studies 13 analyzed the societies in which they lived, including Anton Wilhelm Amo, C. R. L. James, Frantz Fanon and Stuart Hall, to

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(Hartsock, 1983), but applications of standpoint theory as it relates to other subordinate groups have been utilized as well (see Swignoski, 1994). Standpoint theory focuses on perspectives of women, but also could take the perspectives of African American women, poor White women/men, non-White women and men and individuals belonging to minority ethnic and religious groups outside modern Western society (see Orbe, 1998). Fundamental Tenets of Standpoint Theory Standpoint refers to a specific societal position, the result of one’s field of experience, that serves as a

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Gunilla Florby, Mark Shackleton and Katri Suhonen

Has Canada moved beyond the nation state into the world of the post-national? To what extent have fixed notions of Canadian nationhood been replaced by a more global, decentralized sense of identification? Is nationhood (or post-nationhood) best expressed by statelessness and exile or by belonging? Or can Canadian national identity in fact fruitfully coexist with the post-national consciousness? These are some of the issues covered by this volume, issues seen from a range of perspectives – literary, cultural, political and economic. In the literary sphere the national/post-national debate is explored both through canonical writers, such as L. M. Montgomery, Stephen Leacock, and Marie-Claire Blais, and through recent First Nations, Asian-Canadian, African-Canadian, Ukrainian-Canadian and Quebec writing. The political and economic range is equally diverse, covering such topics as immigration policy, multiculturalism, Canadian-American relations, tourist imaginings of the Canadian North, the Canadian city, and Quebec nationalism. The book brings together 27 original articles from international scholars and creative writers, offering both European and Canadian perspectives. Six articles in French focus specifically on the francophone sphere.
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Sociocultural constraints in EFL teaching in Cameroon 235 and new sayings. Africa alone, through its world-famous writers like Wole Soy- inka, Chinua Achebe and others, has enriched the English language with sayings like "If you want to eat a toad, choose a fat and juicy one" (Achebe in No Longer at Ease) or "Do not test the depth of a river with both feet" (quoted by Bowers 1992: 35) which are most welcome in the language. However, many English words, expressions, idioms and sayings used all over the world are still very much British (sometimes American) as illustrated

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German audiences and practiced ‘connected dierences’ to other oppressed groups worldwide.51 Among these theorists, the work of Black women was emphasized, such as that of African American feminist and theorist bell hooks, as previously highlighted, and others such as Afro-Portuguese, Berlin-based writer, professor and artist, Grada Kilomba. e youth group integrated additional cultural texts of the African diaspora in the produc- tion, including the following: African American feminist and abolition- ist Sojourner Truth’s ‘Ain’t I a Woman?’ speech; the African

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connectivity between Harper and Du Bois and many other civilizationist who made use of an African antiquity. 19 Nevertheless, there is this continuum and consistency among various writers in respect to the utilization of the literary and the intellect to uplift a designated people and by extension to make the world as a whole better with an educationally enlightened citizenry. Du Bois recognized the need for high educational intellect in American civilization and by 1892 he was on his way to equip himself. For Du Bois the practice of education and building intellect

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: technological colonization, manifest destiny, and the frontier myth in Facebook’s public pedagogy. Educational Studies, 46, 503–523. Furniss, G., & Gunner, l. (1995). Power, marginality, and African oral literature. Melbourne: Cambridge university Press. Gabbin, J. V. (1990). a laying on of hands: Black women writers exploring the roots of their folk and cultural tradition. In J. M. Braxton & a. N. Mclaughlin (eds.), Wild women of the whirlwind: Afro-American culture and the contemporary literary renaissance (pp. 246–263). New Brunswick, NJ: rutgers university Press