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African American families and how it is affected by contemporary social factors such as racism and economic conditions. The model also explains how such knowledge can be used to make African American families and communities viable institutions for growth and development (Nobles, Goddard, Cavil, & George, 1987). African Feminism African feminism is a manifestation of the need to ensure the survival and resistance to oppression for African people (Steady, 1992). African feminism pays ← 56 | 57 → particular attention to the unique experiences of African women shaped by

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particular topics that transcend specific geographical borders, such as Gender Studies, Women’s Studies, Ethnic Studies, Race Studies, African American Studies, and other fields. 10 Relying on these areas, I would like to center my attention upon one particular issue: the experience of peoples of African descent located and dislocated in the Americas as a particular point of study. This would allow me to transgress the strict borders of African American Studies as a discipline focused on the United States. Similarly, I will show how Latin American Studies has often

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roots die: Endangered traditions on the Sea Islands . Athens: University of Georgia Press. ← 166 | 167 → Kraft, M. (1995). The African continuum and contemporary African-American writers: Their literary presence and ancestral past. New York: Peter Lang. Laguerre, M. S. (1998). Diasporic citizenship: Haitian Americans in transnational America . New York: St. Martin’s Press. Last, M. (1981). The importance of knowing about not knowing. Social Science and Medicine, 15 (B), 387–392. Lattas, A. (1993). Essentialism, memory and resistance: Aboriginality and the

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. Lacan, Jacques. “The Significance of the Phallus.” Écrits: A Selection. Trans. by Alan Sheridan. New York and London: Norton Publishing, 1977. print. —. Écrits: A Selection. Trans. by Alan Sheridan. New York and London: Norton Publishing, 1977. print. Lee, Valerie. Granny Midwives and Black Women Writers. Routledge: New York, 1996. print. Leonard, Keith: “African American Women Poets and the Power of the Word.” The Cambridge Companion to African American Women’s Literature. 264 Ed. Angelyn Mitchell and Danille K. Taylor. Cambridge: Cambridge University

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. This new perspective should include what is distinctively good and useful in the African American experiences.” 40 “While Jones (1972) and other writers emphasize different themes, three key racist cultural themes emerge from a survey of the literature: (1) Blacks as unattractive and not socially valuable; (2) Blacks as unable to be effective in the world, to achieve, to manage people or events, or to compete with Whites; and (3) Blacks as aggressively impulsive and uncontrolled. These, then, may be key cultural themes of racism to which the Black individual (and

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, Virginia. The People Could Fly. American Black Folktales . New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1985. Hirsch, Marianne, and Miller, Nancy K. (eds.). Rites of Return. Diaspora Poetics and the Politics of Memory . New York: Columbia University Press, 2011. Kelly, Natasha A. “Afroism”. Zur Situation einer ethnischen Minderheit in Deutschland . Saarbrücken: VDM Verlag, 2008. Kraft, Marion. The African Continuum and African-American Women Writers. Their Literary Presence and Ancestral Past . Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1995. Mayer, Ruth. Diaspora. Eine kritische

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Hollywood tradition. It is from this film that replicas of documentary stories of Germans (mostly women) in Africa have been filmed. Of late he has produced another Hollywood style film, Wüssteblüme that is set in Somalia, United Kingdom and the United States of America. Secondly, the German filmmakers have attached themselves heavily on the TV as a source of marketing as well as the premiering point. 93 That may explain the increase in TV drama and/or mini-series on Africa which seem to enjoy greater success than documentaries and feature length films. From the corpus

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, which carries not only the danger of victimising women, but also a mechanism of self- fulfilling prophecy which should be avoided by all means: an emphasis on the idea that women in `developing countries' in Africa are `voiceless' precludes a focus on the systematic practices of patriarchy and neo- capitalist energies which daily amputate most men's access to all-too-audible discussions (n. pag.). 6 Women Have a Mouth': Re-theorisingVoicelessness Bennett further states that [w]hile it remains true that gender hampers many women writers' access to publishers

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). Butler, Judith, Bodies that Matter; On the Discursive Limits of Sex , (New York and London: Routledge, 1993). Cameron, Kenneth, Africa on Film; Beyond Black and White , (New York: Continuum, 1994). Cameron, Kerstin, Kein Himmel über Afrika , (Berlin, Ullsteinbuch Verlag, 2003). Campt, Tina, Pascal Grosse and Yara-Colette Lemke-Minuz de Faria, ‘Blacks, Germans and the Politics of Imperial Imagination, 1920-60,’ in The Imperialist Imagination: German Colonialism and Its Legacy , 210-3. Carby, Hazel, ‘White Women listen; Black Feminism and the Boundaries of Sisterhood

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advent of the women’s liberation movement have had the effect of promoting changes in sex-role socialization and political and economic relationships. Finally, according to Aldridge (2007), healthy Black male-female relationships must grow out of a conscious struggle to change values and larger society. Location Theory How does one critique scholarly discourse of African American and non-African American writers and critics from an Afrocentric perspective? For this very purpose Asante (1992b) developed location theory. According to Asante (1992), through the expression