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, Virginia. The People Could Fly. American Black Folktales . New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1985. Hirsch, Marianne, and Miller, Nancy K. (eds.). Rites of Return. Diaspora Poetics and the Politics of Memory . New York: Columbia University Press, 2011. Kelly, Natasha A. “Afroism”. Zur Situation einer ethnischen Minderheit in Deutschland . Saarbrücken: VDM Verlag, 2008. Kraft, Marion. The African Continuum and African-American Women Writers. Their Literary Presence and Ancestral Past . Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1995. Mayer, Ruth. Diaspora. Eine kritische

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Hollywood tradition. It is from this film that replicas of documentary stories of Germans (mostly women) in Africa have been filmed. Of late he has produced another Hollywood style film, Wüssteblüme that is set in Somalia, United Kingdom and the United States of America. Secondly, the German filmmakers have attached themselves heavily on the TV as a source of marketing as well as the premiering point. 93 That may explain the increase in TV drama and/or mini-series on Africa which seem to enjoy greater success than documentaries and feature length films. From the corpus

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, which carries not only the danger of victimising women, but also a mechanism of self- fulfilling prophecy which should be avoided by all means: an emphasis on the idea that women in `developing countries' in Africa are `voiceless' precludes a focus on the systematic practices of patriarchy and neo- capitalist energies which daily amputate most men's access to all-too-audible discussions (n. pag.). 6 Women Have a Mouth': Re-theorisingVoicelessness Bennett further states that [w]hile it remains true that gender hampers many women writers' access to publishers

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). Butler, Judith, Bodies that Matter; On the Discursive Limits of Sex , (New York and London: Routledge, 1993). Cameron, Kenneth, Africa on Film; Beyond Black and White , (New York: Continuum, 1994). Cameron, Kerstin, Kein Himmel über Afrika , (Berlin, Ullsteinbuch Verlag, 2003). Campt, Tina, Pascal Grosse and Yara-Colette Lemke-Minuz de Faria, ‘Blacks, Germans and the Politics of Imperial Imagination, 1920-60,’ in The Imperialist Imagination: German Colonialism and Its Legacy , 210-3. Carby, Hazel, ‘White Women listen; Black Feminism and the Boundaries of Sisterhood

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advent of the women’s liberation movement have had the effect of promoting changes in sex-role socialization and political and economic relationships. Finally, according to Aldridge (2007), healthy Black male-female relationships must grow out of a conscious struggle to change values and larger society. Location Theory How does one critique scholarly discourse of African American and non-African American writers and critics from an Afrocentric perspective? For this very purpose Asante (1992b) developed location theory. According to Asante (1992), through the expression

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, Taylor. Secrecy, Magic, and the One-Act Plays of Harlem Renaissance Women Writers. Columbus, OH: Ohio UP, 2010. Print. Haider, Barbara. Blackness and the Color Black in 20th Century African-American Fiction. Frankfurt: Lang, 2011. Mainzer Studien zur Amerikanistik: Eine europäische Hochschulreihe 57. Haman, Coralie Howard. “The Last Garden.” Birth Control Review June 1926: 201-202. Print. Hardwig, Bill. “The Sentimental Du Bois: Genre, Race and the Reading Public.” W.E.B. Du Bois and Race. Ed. Chester J. Fontenot, Jr. and Mary Alice Morgan. Macon, GA: Mercer

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’s writers, the NOI’s strain of black consciousness has received only brief treatments. The Nation of Islam’s program of black consciousness played an essential role in shaping the vocal and resistive politics of the 1960s inside the black community. African American literature of the period was informed by the ←1 |  2→ Nation’s call for black national identity and consciousness. Younger black artists and writers were inspired to quest for a Black Aesthetic that would liberate them from the mainstream aesthetics and would become a tool to stop white control over

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affirmative action milestones. Retrieved March 6, 2002, from http://www.factmonster.com/spot/affirmativetimeline1.html#1965 Bunting, I. (1994). A legacy of inequality: Higher education in South Africa. Rondebosch, South Africa: UCT Press. 242 whiteness is the new south africa Burke, J. B., & Johnstone, M. (2004). Access to higher education: The hope for democratic schooling in America. Higher Education in Europe, 29(1), 19–31. Cannon, K. G. (1995). Katie’s canon: Womanism and the soul of the Black community. New York: Continuum. Carim, N. (1999). School effectiveness in

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. Brunner, B. (2001). Timeline of affirmative action milestones . Retrieved March 6, 2002, from http://www.factmonster.com/spot/affirmativetimeline1.html#1965 Bunting, I. (1994). A legacy of inequality: Higher education in South Africa. Rondebosch, South Africa: UCT Press. ← 241 | 242 → Burke, J. B., & Johnstone, M. (2004). Access to higher education: The hope for democratic schooling in America. Higher Education in Europe, 29 (1), 19–31. Cannon, K. G. (1995). Katie’s canon: Womanism and the soul of the Black community . New York: Continuum. Carim, N. (1999

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legitimate means of subversion, and hybridization as a form of disobedience […] Afro-Surrealists distort reality for emotional impact […] Afro-Surrealists strive for rococo: the beautiful, the sensuous, and the whimsical […] The Afro-Surrealist life is fluid, filled with aliases and census-defying classifications. It has no address or phone number, no single discipline or calling. ← 134 | 135 → […] Afro-Surrealism rejects the quiet servitude that characterizes existing roles for African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, women and queer fold. Only through the mixing