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Susans Teaching Black Women’s Literature”. EAST 1/1987, 109–119. ← 61 | 62 → ——. “Between Aversion, Alibi and Acknowledgement: White Feminism and Black Women’s Literature in Germany” Trivia – A Journal of Ideas 14/1989, 52–58. ——. “Frauen afrikanischer Herkunft: Feministische Kultur und Ethnizität in Amerika und Europa. “Beiträge zur feministischen Theorie und Praxis , 27, 25–44. ——. The African Continuum and African-American Women Writers. Their Literary Presence and Ancestral Past . Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1995. ——. Empowering Encounters with Audre

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-Coulilaby, Ricky Reiser and others catalyzed and supported the modern Black German movement of the 1980s and 1990s. This movement began with the establishment of the organizations Initiative Schwarze Deutsche [Initiative of Black Germans, ISD] and Afrodeutsche Frauen [Afro-German Women, ADEFRA]. 22 Its members have always been attentive to transnational issues ← 8 | 9 → of the Black/African Diaspora and to the need to draw attention to and practice Caribbean American poet Audre Lorde’s idea of ‘connected differences’ with Blacks and Communities of Color in Germany and

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the University of Osnabrueck in 1995. She taught at high schools, at Ohio State University, the University of Osnabrueck, the Goethe Institute in Göttingen, and for many years at the undergraduate college of the University of Bielefeld. She has published several essays on racism and feminism, is co-editor of the book Schwarze Frauen der Welt – Europa und Migration [Black Women of the World – Europe and Migration], author of the book The African Continuum and African American Women Writers , the collection of essays Empowering Encounters with Audre Lorde and co

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: Peter Hammer Verlag, 2000. Habermas, Jürgen. Erkenntnis und Interesse . Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 6th edition, 1981. ← 306 | 307 → Hartwig, Jimmy. Ich bin ein Kämpfer geblieben. Meine Siege, meine Krisen, mein Leben . Berlin: Siebenhaar Verlag, 2010. Hügel-Marshall, Ika. Daheim unterwegs. Ein deutsches Leben . Frankfurt am Main: Fischer Taschenbuchverlag, 2001. Münster: Unrast Verlag, 2012. ——. Invisible Woman: Growing Up Black in Germany . Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2001. Kraft, Marion. The African Continuum and African-American Women Writers – Their

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: the entire population is described as belonging either to the whites or the blacks. 4 This oversimplification, and consequent exploitation of the binary opposition black/white, is the very reason why the story is an effective commentary on “racial” logistics. In his latest essay, Trans: Gender and Race in an Age of Unsettled Identities (2016), the American author Rogers Brubaker analyses the much-publicised case of Rachel Dolezal, a white woman who for many years presented herself as “African American” in the United States. Brubaker attempts to transcend the

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, they may influence the result of the present analysis only insofar as such a proportion would impact the whole. It should also be noted that fully translated novels only have been submitted for investigation, while ←65 |  66→ excerpts debated in the periodicals of the era have not been taken into account. Had they also featured in this analysis, the present essay would have been riddled with confusions, especially as far as novels coming from Asia, Africa, and Latin America are concerned. To them, extensive introductory articles were devoted and several pages

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Black German children comprising the finite cohort of adoptees that Yara-Colette Lemke Muniz de Faria identifies in her seminal texts about Afro-German “occupation children.” 1 While Lemke estimates that 4,776 children were born between 1945 and 1955 as a result of the interracial relationships between white German women and African American soldiers, others were born after 1955 and there is no precise number available for the number of children who were relinquished for adoption to the United States. 2 For about 15 years now, I have listened to the stories and

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A Shadow of Myself opens in “Hamburg, September 1998” with the sentence: “The two Africans on the forecourt of the Hauptbahnhof were playing an old Motown hit” ( SM 1, 3). The uncertainty created by the possibility of a gun in The Dancing Face and the shuffling together of aspects of three continents in one sentence (“African” identities; the (transit) space of a continental European “Hauptbahnhof”; the American “Motown” music) in A Shadow of Myself raise expectations. Both novels use heterodiegetic narration, which expands the possibilities of

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theorists, the work of Black women was emphasized, such as that of African American feminist and theorist bell hooks, as previously highlighted, and others such as Afro-Portuguese, Berlin-based writer, professor and artist, Grada Kilomba. The youth group integrated additional cultural texts of the African diaspora in the production, including the following: African American feminist and abolitionist Sojourner Truth’s ‘Ain’t I a Woman?’ speech; the African American ← 295 | 296 → abolitionist Frederick Douglass’s writings; Afro-German author May Ayim’s poems ‘afro

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York: Grove, 1958). Asbrink, Elisabeth, “The Swedish Dream Was Always Too Good to be True, And Now the Far Right Is Back,” The Guardian (May 14, 2019). Ashcroft, Bill, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin, eds., The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Postcolonial Literature (New York: Routledge, 1989). Atsufumi, Kato, ed., Weaving Women’s Spheres in Vietnam: The Agency of Women in Family, Religion, and Community (Leiden: Brill, 2016). Atze, Marcel, “Biblioteca Sebaldiana: W. G. Sebald – ein Bibliophile? Eine Spekulation,” in Franz Loquai, ed., W