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  • All: The African Continuum and African American Women Writers x
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, 1986), xi–xiv; 21–24 and Carol Gilligan, In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women’s Development (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1982). 14. E.g., among 17 dissertations written in this area over last 20 years (as found on the ATS database), only two are written by women and none of them have dealt with ethnic or marginalized issues. It is not clear whether all of the fifteen male writers are of European descent (since some African Americans, for example, can have European last names due to colonial legacy). However, it seems clear that

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Culture and the Christian Missions 1857-1957 (Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America, Inc., 2010), 137. Corroborating this historical knowledge, the Catholic Secretariat of Nigeria, in a monograph wrote that, “The second wave of mission in the 19th century West African sub-region started with the Protestants. The sheer burden of this missionary work lay with the liberated slaves and lay men and women of the West African region. In the region of Nigeria, Yoruba liberated slaves were the most enterprising both in trade and in spreading Christianity. Henry

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contrasting positions found expression in the way the English and American Churches perceived themselves and their respective roles in the Anglican Communion. At home, the Church of England continued to experience a diminishment of status, increasingly regarded as an institution which, in the words of one commentator, “seemed to be posh but no longer strong, conservative but no longer confident, dogmatic but no longer respected.”18 Meanwhile, as inde- pendent Anglican provinces were established to serve newly independent nations across Africa and Asia, a notable

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Books, Inc. 2003, p. 27. 695 Ibid. p. 9. 696 Cf. Maxwell, D.: African Gifts of the Spirit: Fundamentalism and the rise of the born-again movement in Africa: in, Iqtidar, H. & Lehmann, D. (eds.): Op. cit. p. 202. 697 Cf. Burgess, S. M & McGee, G. B. (eds.): Op. cit. p. 324. 202 the importance of such topics like scriptural authority and authenticity, christology and evangelism.698 This group of Christians are also referred to as conservatives. This form of Christian mentality infiltrated into Igboland mostly by American and European evangelists through their

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’: The Peculiar Treat- ment of African American Women in the Myth of Women as Liars.” Journal of Gender, Race, and Justice 3 (Spring 2000): 626–657. 15. Emilie M. Townes, Womanist Ethics and the Cultural Production of Evil (Black Religion, Womanist Thought, Social Justice) (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006), 4. 16. Ibid., 61. 17. Ibid. 18. Obery Hendricks, Living Water (New York: HarperOne, 2004), 3–22. 19. Townes, 76. 20. Ibid., 77–78. 21. See also Hopkins, Heart, 78–9, and Gayraud S. Wilmore, Black Religion and Black Radical- ism: An Interpretation of the Religious

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set of Black megachurch- es illumine a spectrum of teaching/learning dynamics. This analysis does not represent an exhaustive study of the universe of Black megachurches, but rather provides a contextualized glimpse into the mechanisms of a cross- section of diverse congregations using the historic Black Church as a point of reference. Education, the Black Community, and the Black Church In Climbing Jacob’s Ladder: The Enduring Legacy of African- American Families, Andrew Billingsley (1992) best summarizes the place of educa- tion among Blacks: Among all the

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the name of Father Nzambi [Central African name of God] and in the name of Jesus Christ, in the name of the Holy Virgin Mary, and in the name of André Matswa.”7 These and other black prophets in Africa, the West Indies, and the United States identified the dispersed African peoples as the mystical body of the messiah: Their sufferings would lead to the redemption of Africa and, finally, to the redemption of all humanity.8 Americas. In 1921 an Eskimo by the name of Neakoteah proclaimed his messiahship among the half-Christianized Eskimo of Kevetuk, Baffin

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in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Finally, this chapter discusses the synthesizing work of the British theologian Keith Ward, whose dual underpinnings include Christian evan- gelical and Vedantic Indian aspects. “Convergence” is a key term for Ward. It does not lead to a monochromatic muddle, but to the realization of sharply differing tra- ditions engaged in a common quest for unity. 146 | Welcoming the Interfaith Future d_ch 7 thru end_t5 6/14/2012 12:28 PM Page 146 Jeannine Hill Fletcher, Feminism, Pluralism, and Hybridity A bridge builder who consciously

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the last incarnation, in which all previous incarnations are spiritually represented.7 Americas. Although Christianity has been received by many indigenous peoples in North and South America, traditional Indian shamanistic practices 5 Don Richardson, Peace Child (Glendale, Calif.: G/L Regal Books, 1974). 6 John S. Mbiti, Introduction to African Religion (London: Heinemann, 1975), p. 191. 7 Friday M. Mbon, Brotherhood of the Cross and Star: A New Religious Movement in Nigeria (Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang

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Commentary and the Hebrew Bible. Edited by Ken Stone. Cleveland: Pilgrim Press, 2001. ———. Practicing Safer Texts: Food, Sex and Bible in Queer Perspective. New York: T&T Clark/Continuum, 2005. ———. Sex, Honor, and Power in the Deuteronomistic History. Journal for the Study of the Old Testament Supplement Series 234. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1996. Strathern, Marilyn. The Gender of the Gift: Problems with Women and Problems with Society in Melanesia. Studies in Melanesian Anthropology 6. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. Strawn, Brent A