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confident, more self-sufficient, and more choosy than ever, women no longer see marriage as a matter of survival and acceptance. They feel free to start and end relationships at will--more like, say, men. […] Single by choice--it's an empowering statement for many women. Yet it's not a choice that all women arrive at easily or without some angst, and it raises a multitude of questions. […]The embrace of singlehood is, in some ways, a logical result of the expanding possibilities for women brought on by the women's movement. (Tamala M. Edwards. “Flying Solo. Who

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confidence to produce more than generic comedies and television movies. A renewed ambition has characterized recent film-making in Germany and such ambition has been rewarded by sustained critical attention, broad exposure to cinematic audiences both in Germany and abroad, and even occasional commercial success and recognition in Hollywood. While direct comparisons to the New German Cinema of the 1960s and 1970s are perhaps misleading, the recent works of the young(ish) German cinema once again show an inter- est both in the country’s history and in its current

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the GDR, which are recalled in flashback sequences. 3 See Brigitta B. Wagner (ed.), DEFA after East Germany (Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2014), p. 324. 4 Wolfgang Hoebel, ‘Andreas Dresen übers DDR-Kino: “Das Chaos war die beste Zeit”’, Spiegel Online, 27 September 2014. 5 For example Daniela Berghahn, Hollywood Behind the Wall (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2005), p. 245. 6 The most obvious link between the two is the title of the Berlin film which is inspired by the principal source for Die Polizistin: Annagret Held, Meine Nachtgestalten (My Night

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distort rather than clarify the past. Donnersmark’s film received broad international acclaim and is routinely shown to school children in Germany to teach a reassuring moral lesson, but this film, in Dresen’s opinion, has ‘mit der DDR so viel zu tun wie Hollywood mit Hoyerswerda’ / ‘as much in common with the GDR as Hollywood has with Hoyerwerda’.2 As a director who was born and raised in the GDR, he wants to tell different stories. He was drawn once again to the Wende in Als wir träumten because of the period’s openness, its location in-between two worlds

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Erika Mann, Erika Mann: Blitze überm Ozean, 74–7. 14 ‘Hollywood bei Nacht’ (Hollywood at night, 1928) in ibid., 59–60. 15 ‘Das kleine Mädchen von Honolulu’ (The little girl from Honolulu, 1928) in ibid., 57–8. 178 Elke Nicolai ‘Henry’ to be a ‘Fleischbeschau’ because most of the actors waited in vain to be discovered, and came to the conclusion, ‘Dagegen haben Berliner Theaterleute ja goldene Herzen!’16 She found American young people’s attitude toward life more alienating than their European counterparts’. She amusingly and ironically described male and female

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Heartfield, on his way to a university appointment, for a time seemed unable to shake his one-time association with Stalin adver- sary Willi Münzenberg; and Ernst Bloch also faced direct criticism from Ulbricht, which evolved into a running quarrel. If Feuchtwanger valued the artistic freedoms of fered by the United States, he had only to stay clear of the Committee on Un-American Activities in order to retain his home and library. In fact he must already have raised some reservations because Becher in the same 1949 letter quoted above writes, ‘No one here would

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film journalism, and in the mid-1920s he became advertisement representative for several big Hollywood firms in central Europe, giving him the opportunity for extensive travels. Later, as a freelance writer, he turned his interest primarily towards film issues and spent some time in Hollywood as a script writer. Under various pseudonyms he also wrote suspense novels. In 1932 he returned to Berlin, but left Germany almost immediately again after the ‘Reichstagsbrand’ in late February 1933. He first moved to Paris, then, at the outbreak of the Civil War in 1936

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ford the amount demanded by Yella and will rather accept the less favourable deal of fered to him initially, Yella threatens to derail the negotiations by leaking informa- tion to a competitor, making his company worthless. Yella’s ruthless behaviour is ultimately unsuccessful, as she tries to extort too much and her opponent commits suicide in order to evade the pressure he is facing. But it raises important questions regarding the development of her character in the course of the film. The scenes discussed before sug- gest first of all that her involvement in

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, literature ref lects societal concerns. We tell sto- ries partly to understand and assess our experiences, or as Jonathan Bate puts it ‘to humanize the big problems’,20 and one of these problems is the threat of ecological disaster. The high level of interest that this threat pro- vokes is evident in the large quantity of contemporary artistic responses. Pandering to the human penchant for the dramatic, Hollywood has pro- duced films featuring ecological catastrophe.21 The most recent of a huge body of these, The Day after Tomorrow by the German director Roland

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simultaneously the histori- cal region of Galicia and an important region in the Dreiländereck [three country triangle] of Carinthia, Galicien is also doubly occupied within the Dreiländereck in terms of language and heritage. In Freudian psychoanalytic 12 See Thomas Elsaesser’s European Cinema: Face to Face with Hollywood (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2005) for an exploration of the contested, multiple identities in contemporary multicultural Europe: ‘[there is] no European […] who is not already diasporic in relation to some marker of dif ference – be it