Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 1,131 items for :

  • All: The African Continuum and African American Women Writers x
Clear All
Restricted access

Series:

Criticism. 2nd rev ed. Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. Alexander, Bishop Daniel William 1880–1968 African Orthodox Church Records 1880–1974, Emory University Libraries, Emory University Archives: RG 005. American Mission Committee at Natal 1851 “Plan for Ef fecting a Uniform Orthography of the South-African Dialects”, Journal of the American Oriental Society, 2: 330–334. Anderson, David 2005 Histories of the Hanged: The Dirty War in Kenya and the End of Empire. New York: W. W. Norton & Company. Anderson, William B. 1977 Man Facing Out. Nairobi

Restricted access

Series:

African Farm and Karen Blixen’s Out of Africa . See his book, White Women Writers and their African Invention , (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2003), 153-181. 11 ‘Re-enacting Colonialism; Germany and its Former Colonies in recent TV Productions,’ in Volker Langbehn, German Colonialism, Visual Culture and Modern Memory, (New York and London: Routledge, 2010), 263. 12 Ibid, 264 13 Wolfgang Struck, ‘Re-enacting Colonialism; Germany and its Former Colonies in recent TV Productions,’ 267. It is worth noting that the German second public broadcaster has

Restricted access

Series:

,” CLA Journal 38 (September 1994): 11–19. Print. Evans, Mari, ed. Black Women Writers (1950–1980): A Critical Evaluation. New York: Doubleday Anchor, 1984. Print. Eyerman, Ron. Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity. Cam- bridge: Cambridge U P, 2001. Print. Espinola, Judith. “Woolf, Virginia, Influence of,” The Toni Morrison Encyclopedia, Ed. Elizabeth Ann Beaulieu. Westport, CT: Greenwood P, 2003: 380–82. Print. Fahy, Thomas. Freak Shows in Modern American Imagination: Constructing the Damaged Body from Willa Cather to Truman

Restricted access

Series:

Postmodern Blackness . New York: Palgrave, 2010. Print. Eckard, Paula Gallant. “The Interplay of Music, Language, and Narrative in Toni Morrison’s Jazz,” CLA Journal 38 (September 1994): 11–19. Print. Evans, Mari, ed. Black Women Writers (1950–1980): A Critical Evaluation. New York: Doubleday Anchor, 1984. Print. Eyerman, Ron. Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge U P, 2001. Print. Espinola, Judith. “Woolf, Virginia, Influence of,” The Toni Morrison Encyclopedia , Ed. Elizabeth Ann Beaulieu. Westport, CT

Restricted access

Hurston, rescued these marginal and silent women from oblivion and invisibility. Marshall revisions Africa’s colonial past from the perspective of the dominated one. Coser, referring to Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, and Paule Marshall as Afro-American writers, considers that: “The fiction of these black women writers in the US attempts to recapture and reorganize the fragments of collective history into a new type of narrative. […] Rooted ←303 |  304→ in culture and community, this narrative is an attempt to counter the versions of facts and truth presented by the

Restricted access

production. This chapter will discuss the responses of Black feminist theories to urban fiction/street lit, a highly controversial African American literary genre that has emerged since the 1990s and has its roots in the storytelling aesthetics of hip-hop culture. The writers of this genre pose a provocative challenge for Black feminist theorizing; at first sight, the genre appears to offer a continuation of earlier African American women writers’ interest in the discourse on ‘gender identity’ and ‘race’ which seems to allow a possible positioning into earlier, well

Restricted access

responses of Black feminist theories to urban fiction/street lit, a highly contro- versial African American literary genre that has emerged since the 1990s and has its roots in the storytelling aesthetics of hip-hop culture. The writers of this genre pose a provocative challenge for Black feminist theorizing; at first sight, the genre appears to offer a continuation of earlier African American women writers’ interest in the discourse on ‘gender identity’ and ‘race’ which seems to allow a possible positioning into earlier, well-established Black feminist literary

Restricted access

Series:

the visceral joys and agonies of a child’s coming of age. I shall argue that much guilty, confessional writing of white, English- speaking women (and men)2 There has been in recent years a proliferation of texts, autobiographies as well as autobiographical texts presented as novels, which narrate white southern African stories from a profoundly personal angle, texts which resurrect childhood in order to construct a present truth. This is a new phenomenon. As Lütge Coullie points out, during apartheid when writers like Ezekiel Mphahlele and Bessie Head were

Restricted access

Series:

Christian law which at the time was a key element. Civilization required duty, morality, and restraint, but as we will see with African American women writers like Frances Harper and Drusilla Dunjee Houston and ←95 |  96→ with Du Bois in particular the better civilization must consider the traditions of duty, morality, and restraint and it must also leave room for breadth and multiplicity for the sake of incorporating a more inclusive world for all involved. The Afrotopic positioning could be considered critical but yet insightful in that it strives to affirm the

Restricted access

: Migrant Metaphors . 1995. 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005a. Boehmer, Elleke. Stories of Women: Gender and Narrative in the Postcolonial Nation . Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2005b. Boehmer, Elleke. “Doubling the Writer: David Attwell on His Textual Dialogue with J. M. Coetzee.” Wasafiri: The Magazine of International Contemporary Writing 63 (2010): 57–61. Boehmer, Elleke, Katy Iddiols, and Robert Eaglestone, eds. J. M. Coetzee in Context and Theory . London: Continuum, 2009. Continuum Literary Studies. Boes, Tobias. Formative Fictions