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), Theology, Music and Time, Cambridge: Cambridge Univer- sity Press. Belenky, Mary Field, McVicker Clinchy, Blythe, Rule Goldberger, Nancy, Mattuck Tarule, Jill (1986), Women’s Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice, and Mind, New York: Basic Books. Bibliography 351 Bell, Judith and Bell, Tim (2012), Nurturing Students in School Music programme after a Natural Disaster. Paper given at the International Society for Music Education Conference, Thessaloniki, Greece, July, pp. 59–64. Bender, Courtney (2010), The New Metaphysicals: Spirituality and the American

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Kennedy, father of John, Bobby and Ted, who had entered the motion picture business by acquiring a studio called Film Booking Offices of America, which developed through merg- ers and takeovers into RKO Studios, one of the leading film factories of the 1930s and 1940s. Connolly became a film writer and producer with more than forty films to his name; he also wrote several literary works with strong moral and Catholic meanings. According to Capra, Connolly, whom he befriended after making two or three of his ‘talkie’ films, urged him to raise the intellectual

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-Ortiz’s informants, a gay-identified Cuban American man from Miami, identifies gay men as ideal candidates for the role of oriaté because of “a certain willingness and openness to lis- tening to or receiving the deities” (p. 57). The oriaté role is also described as a ritual specialist and diviner (Connor, 2004; Clark, 2005). Clark (2005) suggests that Santería in the cabildos was organized and established by women called matronas (“matrons” or “queens”), who based the practice on “African religious traditions that were strongly female- identified” (2005, p. 7). Largely

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trained in studios on the Continent. John Gibson’s workshop in Rome was one such venue. Beginning with Harriet Hosmer in 1852, he taught several American women: Emma Stebbins (1857), Margaret Foley (1861) and Edmonia Lewis (1865). In company with Vinnie Ream and Louisa Lander they were facetiously referred to as the ‘white marmorean f lock’ by Henry James.63 Among Gibson’s British pupils were Mary Lloyd and (perhaps) Mary Grant. Lloyd, the lifelong companion of the noted feminist Frances Power Cobbe, studied under Gibson during the 1860s, following his pre

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training in Western dance/ movement therapy along with her familiarity with traditions of healing from Haiti and West Africa.15 She argues that because ‘dance/movement therapy focuses therapeutic work directly on the body and its movement, it provides a uniquely targeted therapy modality for survivors of extreme and ongoing stress and violence, albeit one that must be modified to be culturally congruent and non-invasive’ (Gray 2008: 225). Dance/movement therapy theory posits that the health-dysfunction continuum is ref lected somatically, in the body, and that

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Mussolini’s wife. The threat embodied by Ida – for which she will be vilified and labelled mad – is the relentlessness of her challenge not only to Mussolini personally but to the gender politics of institutionalised fascism.9 This is best conveyed by the framing of a screaming Ida on the streets outside Mussolini’s office – denouncing him for his abandonment of his wife and son – against the backdrop of the famous war-time poster in which the allegorical figure of Italia Turrita admonishes the women of Italy to ‘Tacere’. A similar and equally gendered exhortation

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North America and Europe in conjunction with the consolidation and radicalization of liberal capitalism.20 Although a representational system with professional politicians and an elected government had replaced a popular assembly and the participation of citizens chosen by lot, the name chosen to refer to the modern practice, ‘democracy’, was the same that Plato and Aristotle had used for the ancient Athenian mode of govern- ment. While, on one level, the abolition of slavery and the extension of full political rights to women, including access to the highest

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, recent work in the field of Queer Studies has argued for the positive embrace of transnational bonds among LGBT artists and intellectuals.24 This is not to suggest that specific groups had a greater proclivity for cosmopolitanism – after all, such claims would come dangerously close to replicating the stereotyping of the past. What it does indicate, however, is that cosmopolitanism could form a positive response to marginalization. For instance, Nico Slate has argued that African American and Indian activists developed ‘colored cosmopolitanism through which

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idea is that there is a continuum between ETA and Herri Batasuna, through men who are rude to independent women. Another member of the family emphasises the idea of the sole commitment to violence, when he assures: “you [Herri Batasuna] run in the elections, but you don’t show up at parliament, not even to defend your thing.” In concordance with public opinion during the late 1990s, in Yoyes, Herri Batasuna is just a loudspeaker for ETA. They are both the same thing. The director Helena Taberna made a similar use of the character that Uribe made in Mikel

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’ (The Reform of Church Music, 23). 74 The exclusion of women from choirs in the wake of the motu proprio undoubtedly caused considerable disenchantment among singers, organist-choirmasters, and clergy. After establishing fine mixed choirs at St Vincent’s and at the cathedral in Cork city respectively, Fr Gaynor and Hans Conrad Swertz were among those completely disil- lusioned by the ban on women imposed by Pius X. Such disappointment must have been further sustained by what one writer described as the ‘more or less general view […] that the Holy Father sent his