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  • All: The African Continuum and African American Women Writers x
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by one witness who declared of the Japanese and Japanese Americans, “One day they were there—and the next day they were gone,” (San Francisco Department of City and County Planning, 2008–2009, p. 34). Writer Maya Angelou recalled an impression of “visible revolution” as African Americans took over the Nihonmachi spaces in San Francisco and Los Angeles. One might question whether any ethnic enclave could retain a sense of cultural purity throughout its history, but Evacuation Order 9066 altered forever the identified space of Nihonmachi as well as the lives

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, NY: Continuum Press. Lew, A. (2003). Debating tourism after 9/11. Tourism Geographies, 5(1), 1–2. doi:10.1080/ 1461668032000034024 MacDonald, D. B. (2008). Bush’s American and the new exceptionalism: Anti-American- ism, the Holocaust and the transatlantic rift. Third World Quarterly, 29(6), 1101–1118. doi:10.1080/01436590802201063 Mamdani, M. (2001, November 7). Uganda: good Muslim or bad. All Africa. Retrieved from http:// allafrica.com/stories/200111070111.html Mann, C. (2011, December 20). Smoke screening. Vanity Fair, December 20, 2011. Retrieved from http

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be staking their claim on the public discourse. The Pew Internet & American Life Project found that half of all bloggers are women (Lenhart & Fox, 2006). Many women blog about their experiences as mothers. These so-called “mommy bloggers” are more likely to write journal-type blogs characterized by their regular posts about family and community-related issues (Stavrositu & Sundar, 2012). “The personal is political”, a phrase coined in 1969 during the height of the women’s movement, came out of an essay written by Carol Hanisch in 1969 (later published in

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. Bledcom 2009 was dedicated to culture in public relations. Sriramesh and Verčič’s (2009) Global Handbook now includes areas such as South America, the Caribbean, Australasia, Eastern Europe and African nations. And now we have this volume. We applaud this trend and propose that it should be extended beyond descriptions of national public relations practice to explore the patterns of various sub-groups within nations. There is a rich tapestry yet to be woven. This can be illustrated by an examination of a New Zealand Māori public relations protocols. New Zealand Māori

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had anticipated: thir- ty-one other countries were represented. The United Kingdom (n = 81; 12.8 percent) was also coded as an individual country because of the number of respondents. The remaining countries were recoded into seven regions mod- eled on those used by television scholars. Only two of these regions, how- ever, had enough respondents to produce reliable regression and ANOVA results: Europe (n = 135) and Australia/New Zealand (n = 27). Africa, Asia, South America, South Asia, and Western Asia were recoded as missing values for the reason that there

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unnatural. Machines take over functions of the central ner- vous system. The brain is like a phonograph.3 In modern literature, women turn into celluloid and men into typewriters, and gramophones and radios influence turning women into prostitutes and men into poets.4 All of these are due to an essential, technologically induced blindness. Circa 1900 several blindnesses—of the writer, of writing, of script—come together to guarantee an elementary blindness: the blind spot of the writing act. Instead of the play between Man the sign-setter and the writing surface

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have not only witnessed an internationalization of rolling news channels, but a regionalization of them. This has been reinforced by international 126 | stephen cushion channels creating sister channels in different regions of the world. So, for exam- ple, Russia Today (now called RT) has launched English, German and French channels (including RT America, RT UK, RT Deutsch and RT Français). Al Jazeera, of course, is not just a Middle Eastern broadcaster; it has English, Balkans, American and Türk sister channels. Likewise, China’s CCTV has American and African

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, Fahrten zur Smaragdinsel, 349–64, here 351–2. 5 Bourke writes of ‘the limitless and timeless domains and blurred contours of the Ossianic world’. See here: Bourke, ‘Introduction’, 2. 6 See here: Oehlke, ‘Nachwort’, 351. 7 See here: Oehlke, ‘Nachwort’, 352. 8 See here: Bourke, ‘Introduction’, 8. Unravelling a “Canon” of Representations 37 These texts from the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries con- tain the first mass-circulated German stereotypes of Ireland; the first set of textual semantics describing the country, which later writers in various contexts

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, a color’s relationship to its opposite color . The different ways in which cultures make the continuum of colors relevant by categorizing and identifying hues or chromatic units correspond to different color systems . For example, Africans often categorize color on two basic extremes—white and black . Between these two extreme limits is placed the color red . “For the African the three colours therefore form a sort of continuum, ranging from white to black, but passing through an aphelion where red is situated” (Zahan, 1977, p . 57) . In contrast, Western

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intonation; and the misunderstanding between an African-American student and his white instructor when each misinter- preted the discursive strategies of the other (Gumperz 1982: 173; Gumperz and Tan- nen 1979: 315).3 The latter case is interesting, because a discussion was needed to ar- 3 Incidentally, lack of contextualization cues may result in misunderstanding even in intra-cultural communication: Gumperz and Tannen (1979:309) provide an example where, in a telephone The role of cultural scripts and