Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 2,490 items for :

  • All : medieval interventions x
Clear All
Restricted access

Series:

Portugal unido, y separado . Propaganda and the discourse of identity between the Habsburgs and the Braganza Eulàlia M IRALLES National history, own language and otherness: Catalonia in the 16 th -18 th Centuries ← 6 | 7 → Giovanni C. C ATTINI and David C AO Uses of the Medieval Past in the Political Culture of 19 th Century Catalonia Maria da Conceição M EIRELES P EREIRA Historical Reference in the 19 th Century Portuguese Discourse Òscar C OSTA Re-imagining the State: Pan-Iberianism and Political Interventionism in the Context of Catalan Nationalism Dick E. H

Restricted access

Series:

−77, 81, 82 Yewno Discover, 77, 85 Z Zorich, Diane M., 12 Zumthor, Paul, 5, 15, 22, 23, 27−29, 34, 35 MEDIEVAL INTERVENTIONS New Light on Traditional Thinking Stephen G. Nichols General Editor Medieval Interventions publishes innovative studies on medieval culture broadly conceived. By “innovative,” we envisage works espousing, for example, new research protocols especially those involving digitized resources, revisionist approaches to codicology and paleography, reflections on medieval ideologies, fresh pedagogical practices, digital humanities, advances

Restricted access

Series:

incisively discussing a broad swath of texts, from the biblical Book of Daniel to Chaucer—a difficult task that testifies to the author’s erudition.” —Matthew Goff, Professor of Religion, Florida State University Dreams, Visions, and the Rhetoric of Authority MEDIEVAL INTERVENTIONS New Light on Traditional Thinking Stephen G. Nichols General Editor Vol. 11 The Medieval Interventions series is part of the Peter Lang Humanities list. Every volume is peer reviewed and meets the highest quality standards for content and

Restricted access

Series:

The Power and Value of Music Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Names: Kramarz, Andreas, author. Title: The power and value of music: its effect and ethos in classical authors and contemporary music theory / Andreas Kramarz. Description: New York: Peter Lang, [2016] | Series: Medieval interventions: new light on traditional thinking; ISSN 2376-2683 (print), ISSN 2376-2691 (online); v. 1 | Includes bibliographical references and indexes. Identifiers: LCCN 2015047991 | ISBN 9781433133787 (hardcover: alk. paper) | ISBN 9781453918340 (e

Restricted access

- cimiento. 2nd expanded ed. (1966; Madrid: Editorial Gredos, 1970). Allen, Rosamund, “The Date and Provenance of King Horn: Some Interim Reassessments,” Medieval English Studies Presented to George Kane, ed. Edward Donald Kennedy, Ronald Waldron, and Joseph S. Wittig (Suffolk: St. Edmundsburg Press, 1988), 99–126. Allen, Sister Prudence, R.S.M., The Concept of Woman. Vol. II: The Early Humanist Reformation, 1250–1500 (Grand Rapids, MI, and Cambridge: William B. Eeerdmans Publishing Company, 2002). Allen, Sister Prudence, R.S.M., The Concept of Woman: The Aristotelian

Restricted access

Series:

, Professor Jeannette M. 195 wisdom (phronêsis) 116, 215 worldview, developed through reading 86 MEDIEVAL INTERVENTIONS New Light on Traditional Thinking Stephen G. Nichols General Editor Medieval Interventions publishes innovative studies on medieval culture broadly conceived. By “innovative,” we envisage works espousing, for example, new research protocols especially those involving digitized resources, revisionist approaches to codicology and paleography, reflections on medieval ideologies, fresh pedagogical practices, digital humanities, advances in gender

Restricted access

Spectral Sea

Mediterranean Palimpsests in European Culture

Series:

Edited by Stephen G. Nichols, Joachim Küpper and Andreas Kablitz

From the dawn of ancient civilization to modern times, the Mediterranean Sea looms in the imagination of the people living on its shores as a space of myth and adventure, of conquest and confrontation, of migration and settlement, of religious ferment and conflict. Since its waters linked the earliest empires and centers of civilization, the Mediterranean generated globalization and multiculturalism. It gave birth to the three great monotheisms—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—religions of the book, of the land and of the sea. Over the centuries, the Mediterranean witnessed the rise and fall of some of the oldest civilizations in the world. And as these cultures succeeded one another, century after century, each left a tantalizing imprint on later societies. Like the ancient artifacts constantly washed up from its depths, the lost cities and monuments abandoned in its deserts or sunk beneath its waves, Mediterranean topography and culture is a chaotic present spread over a palimpsest many layers deep.

No region grappled more continuously with, nor was more deeply marked by Mediterranean culture and history than Europe. Europe’s religions, its languages, its learning, its laws, its sense of history, even its food and agriculture, all derived from Greek, Roman, and—in the Middle Ages—Muslim and Jewish cultures. The essays in this book lay bare the dynamics of cultural confrontation between Europe and the Mediterranean world from medieval to modern times. One momentous result of this engagement was the creation of vernacular languages and the diverse body of literature, history, and art arising from them. The achievements of the arts reveal—to borrow a geological metaphor—the grinding tectonic pates of Mediterranean cultures and languages butting up against pre-existing European strata.

Restricted access

Series:

Amity Reading

Reading the Anglo-Saxon Self Through the Vercelli Book explores conceptions of subjectivity in Anglo-Saxon England by analyzing the contents and sources of the Vercelli Book, a tenth-century compilation of Old English religious poetry and prose. The Vercelli Book’s selection and arrangement of texts has long perplexed scholars, but this book argues that its organizational logic lies in the relationship of its texts to the performance of selfhood. Many of the poems and homilies represent subjectivity through "soul-and-body," a popular medieval literary motif that describes the soul’s physical departure from the body at death and its subsequent addresses to the body. Vercelli’s soul-and-body texts, together with its exemplary narratives of apostles and saints, construct a model of selfhood that is embodied and performative, predicated upon an interdependent relationship between the soul and the body in which the body has the potential for salvific action. The book thus theorizes an Anglo-Saxon conception of the self that challenges modern assumptions of a rigid soul/body dualism in medieval religious and literary tradition. Its arguments will therefore be of interest to students and scholars of literature, history, philosophy, and religious studies and would be appropriate for upper-level courses on Old English literature, Anglo-Saxon history, sermons and preaching in medieval England, and medieval religious practice.

Restricted access

Series:

John Bickley

In Dreams, Visions, and the Rhetoric of Authority, John Bickley explores the ways dreams and visions in literature function as authorizing devices, both affirming and complicating a text’s authority. After providing a framework for categorizing the diverse genres and modes of dream and vision texts, Bickley demonstrates how the theme of authority and strategies for textual self-authorization play out in four highly influential works: the Book of Daniel, Macrobius’s Commentary on the Dream of Scipio, Julian of Norwich’s Revelations of Love, and Chaucer’s Hous of Fame.

Restricted access

Series:

conclusion In his farewell address, President of the United States, Barack Obama, com- mented, “[o]ur Constitution is a remarkable, beautiful gift. But it’s really just a piece of parchment. It has no power on its own. We, the people, give it power—with our participation, and the choices we make.”1 To put this another way, documents require community in order to be both effective and affective. As Andrew Cole and D. Vance Smith have argued, the Middle Ages still have legitimacy for the development of theory. If medieval thought still underpins how we