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, use of jargon, 51 220 inDex dhimmīs asking for exemption from taxes paid by, 23 breach of loyalty, 26–27 fragmented Islamic empire creating patronage of, 3 position of minorities under Islamic rule, 19, 20 seeking intercession from rulers, 13 divine intervention Christian belief in, 134 in medieval Christian worldview, 133 miracles in life of Louis IX, 127–129 documents, courtly literature and Jewish, 5–7 Druze religion, Voyage en Orient, 178–179 E Elberich, epic of Ortnit, 113–114 Elyas of Russia, epic of Ortnit, 111–114 empire, concept, absence of in Italia

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intégrer un nouvel intervenant dans notre schéma d’analyse, à savoir le spectateur [C]. Un discours récurrent au sujet de l’imaginaire contemporain des pratiques musicales de l’époque médiévale porte sur la position de l’auditeur à qui le message est adressé. Selon John Haines : « Studying the various interpretations of medieval music requires learning about different readers’ “horizon of expectation” » (Haines 2004, 135). De même, l’intervention du spectateur dans le rapport entre la source musicale primaire [A] et le cadre filmique [B] soulève une problématique

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Conclusion ← 112 | 113 → CONCLUSION In his farewell address, President of the United States, Barack Obama, commented, “[o]ur Constitution is a remarkable, beautiful gift. But it’s really just a piece of parchment. It has no power on its own. We, the people, give it power—with our participation, and the choices we make.” 1 To put this another way, documents require community in order to be both effective and affective. As Andrew Cole and D. Vance Smith have argued, the Middle Ages still have legitimacy for the development of theory. If medieval thought still

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Getting the Blues

Vision and Cognition in the Middle Ages

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Brian J. Reilly

Getting the Blues: Vision and Cognition in the Middle Ages is an interdisciplinary study of medieval color. By integrating scientific and literary approaches, it revises our current understanding of how people in medieval Europe experienced color and what it meant to them. This book insists that the past perception of the world can be recovered by joining timeless universal constraints on human experience (discovered by science) to the unique cultural expressions of that experience (revealed by literature).

The Middle Ages may evoke images of the multicolored stained glass of gothic cathedrals, the motley garb of minstrels, or the brilliant illuminations of manuscripts, yet such color often goes unnoticed in scholarly accounts of medieval literature. Getting the Blues restores some of the most important literary works of the Middle Ages to their full living color. Particular consideration is given to the twelfth-century Arthurian romances by Chrétien de Troyes and the thirteenth-century Lancelot-Grail Cycle.

Getting the Blues engages debates within the humanities and the sciences over universalist and relativist approaches to how humans see and name color. Scholars in the humanities often insist that color is a strictly cultural phenomenon, eschewing as irrelevant to the Middle Ages recent developments in cognitive science that show universal constraints on how people in all cultures see and name color. This book contributes to the recent cognitive turn in the humanities and sheds new light on some of the most frequent and meaningful cultural experiences in the Middle Ages: the perception, use, and naming of color.

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increasing critical atten- tion, and more than other contemporary mystics and their texts, from scholars interested not only in the field of Medieval Studies but also the fields of Women Studies, Gender Studies and more recently Queer Studies. At the same time, Margery and her Book have become a powerful source of inspiration for unconventional authors interested in the interconnections of spirituality and sexu- ality and in her queerness. We shall be taking into examination the way in which the rep- resentation of Margery in her public roles is analyzed more and

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Ethnolinguistics, Cultural Change and Early Scripts from England and Wales | 85 → Chapter Three: Antique-Medieval Transition as a Cultural Process This chapter seeks to draw an image of the Early Middle Ages as a vital element of the orality-literacy puzzle in the context of selected areas of the British Isles. To accomplish this, one should bear in mind that limiting the perspective to presenting a chronology or narrowing the scope of study to England and Wales may prove to be counterproductive. Instead, the proposed concepts aim at providing an overview of the

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discussed in Section 4 naturally induce further questions concerning the rationale behind Wróbel’s syntactic interventions which were not required by Polish syntax and the justification of Rolle’s decisions in the opposite direction: to retain the Latin syntax at the cost of the grammaticality of the target text but only in the case of one syntactic phenomenon, to the total neglect of the other. It seems, however, that zooming out from individual case studies will allow us to synthesise the data and draw conclusions of a more general nature about medieval translators

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directly reflect Josep Puig i Cadafalch’s vision of medieval art well into the 20 th century (Figure 25). And this is neither good nor bad; rather, it is simply a fact that should be noted in history. The consequences of these interventions often lead art historians, especially with the 19 th century interventions, to study a medieval monument as if it were truly medieval, when in fact it is modern or contemporary. Each monument has its own history and most recent interventions, just as those by the architect Antoni González Moreno-Navarro in Sant Quirze de Pedret or

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a larger array of marks. The Wife of Bath’s Prologue , for example, deploys the colon to introduce the direct speech of the host. These different editorial approaches towards Chaucer and Lydgate suggest the emergence of changing perspectives on the late medieval authors and their space within the canon of post-Reformation English literature. ← 97 | 98 → Despite Kyngston adopting the comma and adding the occasional example of grammatical punctuation, the level of intervention is minimal. The significant distinction between the earlier print of the Siege of Thebes

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En torno a 'haber' | 33 → Montserrat Batllori Universitat de Girona El valor modal de haber en los futuros y condicionales analíticos 1 1. Introducción El objetivo de este artículo es ofrecer una aproximación a la caracterización sintáctica, semántica y discursiva de los futuros y condicionales analíticos del español y catalán medievales. Como demuestra la bibliografía que se cita en este trabajo, se trata de construcciones muy estudiadas cuya naturaleza exacta todavía no se ha podido concretar totalmente. Cabe decir, sin embargo, que recientemente Octavio de