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. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� on Language and Identity. London: SAGE, 2001. Barrett, Deirdre, ed. Trauma and Dreams. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2001. 262 Bibliography Barthes, Roland. “Der Tod des Autors.” Texte zur Theorie der Autorschaft. Ed. Fotis Jannidis et al. Stuttgart: Reclam, 2000. 185-198. Bast, Heike. “The Ghosts of Africville, Acadia and the African Continuum. (Re)claiming Ethnic Identity in Africadian Literature.” Zeitschrift für Kanada-Studien 43 (2003): 129-142. Beaulieu, Elizabeth Ann. Black Women Writers and the American Neo-slave Narrative: Femininity

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its norms and values on the minority group, who are derided ← 151 | 152 → because of their skin color and because of an inherited European view of Africans as barbaric, heathen and inferior.” 1 “You belong where White people put you.” 2 This bitter statement by James Baldwin, an African-American writer and literary critic, expresses an essential formulation of the current place of Blacks in mainstream American cinema, which has resulted in the continuation of racial prejudice and deeper divisions in American society. Hollywood mainstream cinema plays a key role

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. Individual administrative ← 164 | 165 → (Bruel, Lefèvre), political (Diagne) and cultural (Montesquieu, Verlaine, Gide, Moran) figures are specifically addressed within the context of a more general dialogue with France’s writers, poets, politicians, colonial administrators and readers everywhere. All become de facto participants in the performance. Incorporation of its audience through call-and-response posts the Preface’s – and the work’s – black attitude textually. It invites comparison with the famous oratorical performance of African-American, Sojourner Truth – Ain

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, where anything can happen […] where the elements of culture and society are released from their customary configurations and recombined.”642 This is, asserts Houston Baker, due to the “inversive nature” of orality-oriented myth itself: Within [it] lies a limitless, liminal freedom wherein the critic of African-American litera- ture can move betwixt and between Western critical methodologies […] [T]he history in the African-American text is merely a reflective one that mirrors the Westernized version of history […] [M]ythologies in black women writers’ texts are

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Notes on contributors Raffaella Baccolini teaches Gender Studies and American Literature at the Uni- versity of Bologna, Forlì. She has published several articles on dystopia and science fiction, trauma literature, women’s writing, memory, and modernist literature. She is the author of Tradition, Identity, Desire: Revisionist Strategies in H. D.’s Late Poetry (Patron, 1995) and has edited several volumes, among which are Dark Horizons: Science Fiction and the Dystopian Imagination (with T. Moylan, Routledge, 2003), Le prospettive di genere: discipline

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postcolonial fiction and African society; on the feminist and novelist Olive Schreiner; on aspects and moments of South African cultural history. She has also been working on gender and women’s studies and has observed the emergence of new, creolised expressions in the West (Black Britain, postcolonial Italy) and elsewhere. From 1987 to 1995, she edited a series of African and Caribbean fiction in Italian and later acted as a consultant for Italian publishers. In recent years, she has researched and published on the new Italian literature produced by writers of African

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portrayed as psychological transference due to the black male’s inability to openly affirm manhood and to challenge the racial oppression perpetuated against the black community by the white dominated society. The men externalize their rage within their households, seeking to exhibit power by oppressing their family members. On the whole, Alice Walker’s focus complies with that of the traditional black American women writers, who “emphasize life within the community, not the conflict with outside forces” (Cannon 2003: 65). External forces are portrayed as a catalyst for

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is the end result of White males’ social and historical construction. This fact is well documented by Richard Dyer (1997) in his study of ideological White masculinity in his seminal work titled White . Furthermore, if ← 44 | 45 → Black and Brown men made use of a violent form of masculinity in dealing with women and men during slavery and continue to do so centuries after slavery, it then is safe to assume that through generations they have reproduced what they witnessed and personally experienced during colonial and postcolonial time. Ben, an African American

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LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS Charlotte Baker is Lecturer in French in the Department of European Languages and Cultures at Lancaster University. She completed a PhD in Twentieth Century French and Francophone Literatures at the University of Nottingham in 2007, and her current research focuses on marginalised and stigmatised groups in sub-Saharan Africa. Charlotte is particularly interested in the fictional work of Guinean writer Williams Sassine and recently published her first monograph, Enduring Negativity: Representations of Albinism in the Fictional Work

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) Call to home: African Americans reclaim the rural South . New York, NY: Basic. ← 213 | 214 → Tate, C. (1985). (Ed.). Black women writers at work . New York, NY: Continuum. Taylor, J. Y. (1998). Womanism: A methodologic framework for African American women. Advances in Nursing Science, 21 (1), 53–64. Tolich, M. (2004). Internal confidentiality: When confidentiality assurances fail relational informants. Qualitative Sociology, 27 (1), 101–106. U.S. Census Report. (1995). Urban and rural population: 1900 to 1990 . Retrieved June 30, 2008, from http