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White Looks Like: African American Philoso- phers on the Whiteness Question. Edited with Introduction and chapter by G. Yancy, New York: Routledge. Young, K., Chambers, C. et al. (1983). Understanding Accreditation. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass. Young, M. (1961). The Rise of the Meritocracy, 1870-2033: an Essay on Education and Quality. Harmondsworth, England: Penguin Books Zipes, J. (1983). Fairytales and the Art of Subversion. New York, Hei- nemann. Zuidervaart, L. (2007). Social Philosophy after Adorno, Cambridge Uni- versity Press. (1990). Proyecto de

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(2), 237–262. Churchill, W. (Ed.). (1983). Marxism and Native Americans. Boston: South End. Churchill, W., & Vander Wall, J. (1990). Agents of repression: The FBI’s secret wars against the Black Panther Party and the American Indian Movement. Boston: South End. Cleaver, K. (1998). Back to Africa: The evolution of the international section of the Black Panther Party (1969–1972). In C. E. Jones (Ed.), The Black Panther Party reconsidered. Baltimore: Black Classic. Cole, M. (2007). Marxism and educational theory: Origins and issues. New York: Routledge. Coulthard, G. S

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, from http://www .nytimes .com/2012/05/26/opinion/the-danger-in-school-spending-cuts .html?_r=0 Farmer-Hinton, R .L ., Lewis, J .D ., Patton, L .D ., & Rivers, I .D . (2013) . Dear Mr . Kozol… . Four African American women scholars and the re-authoring of Savage Inequalities . Teachers College Record, 115(5), 1–38 . Fowler Morse, J . (2012) . Still savage, still unequal . In R . Ognibene (Ed .), A persistent reformer: Jonathan Kozol’s work to promote equality in America (pp . 37–60) . New York: Peter Lang . Freedman, S . (1991, October 6) . Separate and unequal

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East North Africa (MENA) countries (26 percent). A lower share reaches European countries (17 percent), while the rest go to the Americas (16 percent) or the pacific region of Asia (11 per- cent). Of the forcibly displaced people (65.6 million), some 17.2 million are refugees. From a global perspective, there has been an incremental trend in the total numbers of refugees and asylum seekers. In the last five years, there has been an increase of 73 percent (from 9.9 million people in 2012 to almost 17.2 million people by the end of 2016) in the share of refugees

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experiences of the students themselves in connection with their acquisition of academic literacy practices in their research com- munity. By working with novice writers on the periphery of a discipline I believe it is possible to make visible the literacy practices and ways of being of a particular discipline and to gain important insights into the areas of difficulty which may be experienced by newcomers (Ivanic 1997). These experiences often become tacit for established members of a community of practice (Prior 1998). I worked with two men and two women, from

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processes of teaching and learning, building relationships, and consciously creating classroom commu- nity. My work involves close collaboration with students and teachers in Chi- cago public schools, and I occasionally teach my own classes (Gutstein, 2006). In this chapter, I describe one of these efforts. During the 2008–2009 school year, I taught a 12th-grade mathematics class with 21 students at the Greater Lawndale/Little Village School for Social Justice (also known as Sojo). Sojo is 70% Latino (mainly Mexican), 30% Black (African American), and 98% low

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images of bra-burning white women who are very male-like in their disposition, and who resent the process and practice of overt femininity. However, feminism, is very different for the woman of color, be she African American, West Indian, Caribbean (Puerto Rican) or some mix of all, by way of migration and/or lived expe- rience that she reflects on hermeneutically and at a distance. The intercon- nectedness of her social dynamics cannot be quantified by any practice of traditional “science.” For example, the Puerto Rican females in West Side Story have been

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interviews with her and her tutor as evidence. Fannie and her tutor, Morgan, were both minority women: Fannie was Navajo and Morgan, African American. DiPardo explored Fannie’s difficulties with producing academic discourse and Morgan’s inability to reach and understand her. Morgan had attended some ses- sions on collaborative tutoring at the Conference on College Composition and Communication, and DiPardo saw that Morgan thoughtlessly pursued the tech- niques she had learned to the detriment of true communication with Fannie. DiPardo concluded that tutors needed more

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educational achievement and reducing the “achieve- ment gap”—or the “wealth gap” as Kitty Kelly Epstein calls it (Epstein, in Pollick, 2008)—between White and Asian students on the one hand, and students from African American, Latino, and Indig- enous backgrounds and children from low-income backgrounds on the other, after six years, there is overwhelming evidence that the deeply flawed “No Child Left Behind” law (NCLB) is doing more harm than good in our nation’s public schools. NCLB’s test-and-punish approach to school reform relies on limited, one-size-fits-all tools

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, and fresh interpretations uncover new relationships that render traditional accounts out of date (Ellis, 1998; Rose & Kincheloe, 2003). In the 1890s the American Medical Association (AMA) was still proclaiming that women should not go to college because such mental work would take away from their primary role of reproduction—all that think- ing would take blood away from the uterus. Albert Einstein the student was viewed as a failure in his German schools; Einstein the scientist was/is viewed as one of the greatest geniuses of all time. Yesterday’s certainties