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portrayed as psychological transference due to the black male’s inability to openly affirm manhood and to challenge the racial oppression perpetuated against the black community by the white dominated society. The men externalize their rage within their households, seeking to exhibit power by oppressing their family members. On the whole, Alice Walker’s focus complies with that of the traditional black American women writers, who “emphasize life within the community, not the conflict with outside forces” (Cannon 2003: 65). External forces are portrayed as a catalyst for

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is the end result of White males’ social and historical construction. This fact is well documented by Richard Dyer (1997) in his study of ideological White masculinity in his seminal work titled White . Furthermore, if ← 44 | 45 → Black and Brown men made use of a violent form of masculinity in dealing with women and men during slavery and continue to do so centuries after slavery, it then is safe to assume that through generations they have reproduced what they witnessed and personally experienced during colonial and postcolonial time. Ben, an African American

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LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS Charlotte Baker is Lecturer in French in the Department of European Languages and Cultures at Lancaster University. She completed a PhD in Twentieth Century French and Francophone Literatures at the University of Nottingham in 2007, and her current research focuses on marginalised and stigmatised groups in sub-Saharan Africa. Charlotte is particularly interested in the fictional work of Guinean writer Williams Sassine and recently published her first monograph, Enduring Negativity: Representations of Albinism in the Fictional Work

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) Call to home: African Americans reclaim the rural South . New York, NY: Basic. ← 213 | 214 → Tate, C. (1985). (Ed.). Black women writers at work . New York, NY: Continuum. Taylor, J. Y. (1998). Womanism: A methodologic framework for African American women. Advances in Nursing Science, 21 (1), 53–64. Tolich, M. (2004). Internal confidentiality: When confidentiality assurances fail relational informants. Qualitative Sociology, 27 (1), 101–106. U.S. Census Report. (1995). Urban and rural population: 1900 to 1990 . Retrieved June 30, 2008, from http

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processes on the state and civil society, and democratisation and development, with a particular interest in the politics of economic reform and poverty reduction in Latin America. Lorraine Kelly is currently a lecturer in Spanish at NUI Galway, and has previously lectured at University College Cork, the University of Limerick and Dublin Institute of Technology. Her research and teaching is primarily in the area of Latin American literature and she has published articles and contributed to edited collections in the area of Mexican women writers. She is also the co

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know that, because we go to the same church. Since I get this attitude from most men than women, it becomes apparent that most of my male neighbours find it hard to accept that an African, of the female gender can be of equal standards of Christianity; despite the many historical years of missionary work in South Africa. It 1 Frost, Robert:  “Mending Wall”.  Gleeditions,  17  April  2011, retrieved 10.02.2017, from www.gleeditions.com/mendingwall/students/pages. asp?lid=305&pg=5. Originally published in: Lowell, Amy (ed.): Tendencies in Modern American Poetry

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Authenticity of Belief in African (Igbo) Traditional Religion | 141 → Chapter 3: African Traditional Religions and Igbo Objects of Worship 3. Introduction African traditional religions are the religions in Africa before the coming of the Europeans. Most times many writers see the religions in Africa as homogenous while others see them in plurality. In this chapter, we shall concentrate on the belief in African religions, explain why they are ‘religions’ and not ‘religion’ in homogenous sense, and narrow it down to Igbo religion: an ethnic group in Nigeria. We

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of American Folk- lore, 78: 307, 3 – 20. Bloch, M. J., Beoku-Betts, J. & Tabachnick, B. (eds. 1998): Women and Education in Sub- Saharan Africa: Power, Opportunities and Constraints. Boulder. Boateng, F. (1990): African Traditional Education: A Tool for Intergenerational Communica- tion. In: Asante, M. K. & Asante, K. W. (eds.): African Culture: The Rhythms of Unity. Trenton, NJ, 109 – 122. Dei, G. J. S. (2000): The Role of Indigenous Knowledges in the Academy. In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, 4: 2, 39 – 56. Dei, G. J. S. (2004a): Dealing

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Publ., Enugu, Nigeria, 2004. ATHERTON, J., The Scandal of Poverty: Priorities for the Emerging Church, Mowbray & Co. Ltd, London, 1983. ATKINSON, A. B., Poverty and Social Security, Prentice Hall, Harvester Wheatsheaf, New York, 1989. BANSIKIZA, C., Responding to Poverty in Africa, AMECEA Gaba Publ., El- doret, Kenya, 2007. BARRI, F. R., “The Sex Trade Industry’s Worldwide Exploitation of Chil- dren”, in: Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 575, 15 May 2001, 147–157. BIRD, O. A., The Idea of Justice, Praeger, New York, 1967. BITTLE

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1960s to the early 1970s and on. 3.   See Patricia Jones-Jackson, When Roots Die (1987); Melville J. Herskovits, The Myth of the Negro Past (1941); Marion Kraft, The African Continuum and Contemporary African American Writers: Their Literary Presence and Ancestral Past (1995) ; Maureen Warner-Lewis, Guinea’s Other Suns (1991) , Trinidad Yoruba (1997), and Central Africa in the Caribbean (2003); Robert Farris Thompson, Flash of the Spirit (1984); Edward Kamau Brathwaite, History of the Voice (1984); John W. Pulis (ed.), Religion, Diaspora and Cultural