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geschlos­ sene Formen (Munn, 1973, Wales, 1990, zitiert in Cox, 1993, S. 107; siehe auch die Filmdokumenta­ tion von BBC, 1996). In Hinsicht auf diese Beobach­ tung vermerkt Cox (1993, S. 107): «Despite the fact that they have people around them all the time who could serve as models, Walbiri children do not attempt to draw a visual ‹look­a­like› of a person; rather, they adopt the semi­circle symbol used by the adult women in their sand­drawings. It is only with schooling and exposure to Western styles that the children begin to mix the different

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Hollywood tradition. It is from this film that replicas of documentary stories of Germans (mostly women) in Africa have been filmed. Of late he has produced another Hollywood style film, Wüssteblüme that is set in Somalia, United Kingdom and the United States of America. Secondly, the German filmmakers have attached themselves heavily on the TV as a source of marketing as well as the premiering point. 93 That may explain the increase in TV drama and/or mini-series on Africa which seem to enjoy greater success than documentaries and feature length films. From the corpus

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). Butler, Judith, Bodies that Matter; On the Discursive Limits of Sex , (New York and London: Routledge, 1993). Cameron, Kenneth, Africa on Film; Beyond Black and White , (New York: Continuum, 1994). Cameron, Kerstin, Kein Himmel über Afrika , (Berlin, Ullsteinbuch Verlag, 2003). Campt, Tina, Pascal Grosse and Yara-Colette Lemke-Minuz de Faria, ‘Blacks, Germans and the Politics of Imperial Imagination, 1920-60,’ in The Imperialist Imagination: German Colonialism and Its Legacy , 210-3. Carby, Hazel, ‘White Women listen; Black Feminism and the Boundaries of Sisterhood

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struggles for liberation and self-determination punctuate Dash’s film aesthetic, thus making it revolutionary and groundbreaking at the same time. Like other Black feminist writers (Collins, Higginbotham, hooks, Guy-Sheftall, Harris, Crenshaw, Smith, Perry, Cooper), Dash employs film as the narrative tableau for uncovering—literally bringing to light and to life—Black women’s stories, situating their experiences within the nascent, burgeoning, and expanding African diaspora, contested American history, and Black people’s global struggles for liberation and self

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interconnectedness of worldly and other worldly beings. These principles are integral to Black epistemological and ontological thought, pre– and post–Middle Passage and are central to ←18 |  19→ shaping a tradition of spiritual exploration in Black women’s writing. African American writers from Wheatley to Morrison integrate these themes in their work, signaling the early maintenance and integration of an African worldview among displaced Africans and the important role of women as carriers of culture. In her chapter “Between Breath and Death,” Wardi expounds on this idea in

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“position[ed] themselves respectively as potential and active agents of social change” ( 1989 , 3). The concept of the individual’s journey to agency can be found in many texts by African American women writers since the late 1970s, such as Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Nikki Giovanni, Gloria Naylor, Paule Marshall, Maya Angelou, Gayl Jones, Toni Cade Bambara, Sherley Anne Williams, Ntozake Shange, Bebe More Campbell, and Terry McMillan. These writers differ significantly from their predecessors because they do not limit their fiction to descriptions of reality and mere

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legitimate means of subversion, and hybridization as a form of disobedience […] Afro-Surrealists distort reality for emotional impact […] Afro-Surrealists strive for rococo: the beautiful, the sensuous, and the whimsical […] The Afro-Surrealist life is fluid, filled with aliases and census-defying classifications. It has no address or phone number, no single discipline or calling. ← 134 | 135 → […] Afro-Surrealism rejects the quiet servitude that characterizes existing roles for African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, women and queer fold. Only through the mixing

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African Farm and Karen Blixen’s Out of Africa . See his book, White Women Writers and their African Invention , (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2003), 153-181. 11 ‘Re-enacting Colonialism; Germany and its Former Colonies in recent TV Productions,’ in Volker Langbehn, German Colonialism, Visual Culture and Modern Memory, (New York and London: Routledge, 2010), 263. 12 Ibid, 264 13 Wolfgang Struck, ‘Re-enacting Colonialism; Germany and its Former Colonies in recent TV Productions,’ 267. It is worth noting that the German second public broadcaster has

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, Coons, Mulattos, Mammies & Bucks: An Interpretive History of Blacks in American Films , Fourth Edition, New York: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2006. Cripps, Thomas, Slow Fade to Black: The Negro in American Film, 1900–1942 , New York: Oxford University Press, 1993. Eisler, Garrett “Backstory as Black Story: The Cinematic Reinvention of O’Neill’s The Emperor Jones,” Eugene O’Neill Review , Annual, 2010, Vol. 32, pp. 148–162. Hall, Michael Ra-shon, “The Prominence of the Railroad in the African American Imagination: Mobile Men, Gendered Mobility and the

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Renaissance writers as well as an examination of the positive and negative aspects of city life. Micheaux’s project of representing the issues that were central to black urban life serves as a historical link to two later movements within African American film production: black action films (blaxploitation) and the L.A. school of black filmmakers. The black action film genre of the early 1970s, like Micheaux’ s films, incorporated subject matter and thematic concerns in which inner-city impoverishment and crime acted as primary conditions for the narratives. Situated in the