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appeared in the Irish immigrant newspaper Metro Éireann. Like Cauvery Madhavan, Doyle signifies an ideal of Irish openness to other cultures through the meta- phor of interracial romance. For example, in ‘Guess Who Is Coming for the Dinner’, ‘The Deportees’ and ‘I Understand’, Doyle’s African protagonists Ben, Gilbert and Tom, all of whom are asylum seekers from Nigeria, find some measure of social acceptance in the arms of Irish women, whereas in ‘57% Irish’ the Irish protagonist Ray Brady signals the host society’s commitment to cultural diversity through the

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& Company, Publishers. Berbineau, Lorenza Stevens. 2002. From Beacon Hill to Crystal Palace: The 1851 Travel Diary of a Working-Class Woman. Ed. Karen L. Kilcup. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, Berezowski, Leszek. 1997. Dialect in Translation. Wrocław: Wydawnictwo Uni- wersytetu Wrocławskiego. Bettelheim, Bruno. 1976. The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. Bhabha, Homi K. 1994. The Location of Culture. London: Routledge. Blake, Susan L. 1994. “African-American Folktales.” The Heath Anthology of

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 gay bar. Baldwin’s novel was a very honest portrayal of same sex desire, which until then had not been found in both black and American authors. As a result, James Baldwin pioneered in breaking the taboo theme of sexual others. Looking for Langston contains the soundtrack from African American musi- cian and song-writer Blackberri, one of the most visible black queer artists in the country and a pioneer in Gay music, who had his national debut in 1975 on KQED’s5 first gay music concert Two Song Makers. It also makes an ample use of the work of black British gay

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underlies much of contemporary African American writing and is a distinctive feature of the Pulitzer-winning novel The Known World by Edward P. Jones, who “may be the most celebrated writer Washington has ever produced.” (Tucker). Some of the novel’s char- acters understand accommodation as complete acceptance of the white man’s world and its patriarchal racist rules; others do all they can to preserve their cultural heritage, rejecting the rules imposed by the white man. One can only wonder at the skill with which Jones makes the controversial issues of identity

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well as the more disturbing anti- detection of Borges. His analysis of the classic form of the genre discusses how its The Origins and Development of Cuban and Cuban-American Crime Fiction 3 of the criticism of the 1990s and beyond has focused specifically upon the concept of contemporary crime fiction as a vehicle for the exploration of political and social trends: women’s and gay crime fiction, urban spatial geographies, and the issues of race and class, particularly with regard to African American identity.2 However, more work remains to be done on the

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African-American women. Still, the authors' use of the ancestral metaphor is stylistically different in each of these stories. Sometimes the presence is mediative and instructive, sometimes it is mediative and condemnatory, sometimes it is mediative and silent. However, because she serves as a recursive touchstone for the simultaneous existence of and revision in the idea of me- diation, the ancestral presence constitutes the posture of (re)membrance. She is the link- ing of gender and culture that pulls these writers' work together. She accomplishes me- diation in

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, ‘because everyone’s attitudes to the animal have been constructed within its narrow boundaries’.100 The particular clichéd figuration of woman as bird has been embraced to iconoclastic ends by other women writers in the twentieth century, such as the American poet Anne Sexton, whose Love Poems of 1969 include ‘In Celebration of my Uterus’: Everyone in me is a bird. I am beating all my wings. They wanted to cut you out but they will not. They said you are immeasurably empty but you are not.101 98 Ibid., 133. 99 Ibid., 134. 100 Steve Baker, Picturing the Beast

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taking any kind of iden- tity as permanent. The nomad is only passing through; […] s/he never takes on fully the limits of one national, fixed identity. The nomad has no passport – or has too many of them”8. Undoubtedly, Burton was a man with countless passports, who felt at home everywhere and no- where, and who contributed significantly to what Said has called the process of reshaping ideas through travel9. In his peregrinations from Europe to India, from Arabia to Eastern and Western Africa, to Northern and Southern America, Burton came into contact with

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Aboriginal Writing (2000) edited by Anne Brewster, Angeline O’Neill and Rosemary van den Berg; The Strength of Us as Women: Black Women Speak (2000) compiled by Kerry Reed-Gilbert; Skins: Contemporary Indigenous Writing (2000) compiled by Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm and Josie Douglas (which includes Maori, First Nations, Inuit and American Indian writers); Fresh Cuttings: A Celebration of Fiction & Poetry from UQP’s Black Writing Series (2003), selected by Sue Abbey and Sandra Phillips; and most recently, the Macquarie PEN Anthology of Aboriginal Literature (2008), edited

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more agitated as the women begin to loudly keen, and when one mourner flings ‘out her arms inside her cloak, with a gesture that made her look like a great vulture opening its wings for flight’, the horse bucks uncontrollably and throws Francie, breaking her neck. Mark Seltzer describes just this kind of ‘strange permeability of bodies and landscapes’, a ‘failure of distinction’, as a condition precipitating violence,91 in his discussion of the history of associating African Americans with the savage, the natural, the inarticulate. In American ecocritical