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submitting to him, how much more should one submit to God who is the Father of all. See comments in Donald Guthrie, The Letter to the Hebrews (Tyndale New Testament Commentaries; Leicester, UK; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1983), 254. In Heb 13:17, the writer commands the readers to submit (u`pei,kw) to the leaders of the faith community. 36. On the subject of women veiling their heads in 1 Cor 11:2–16, see David W. J. Gill, “The Importance of Roman Portraiture for Head-Coverings in 1 Corinthians 11:2–16,” Tyndale Bulletin 41.2 (1990): 245–60; William J. Martin, “1

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approaches that emphasise the need for biblical interpretations to be “contextual” in order to be relevant and effec- tive. With Bonhoeffer one could argue that they are not contextual enough, that is too abstract and not concrete enough. This is because relevant issues – like poverty, unemployment, violence towards women and children, rac- ism and HIV/Aids (to mention only a few that come to mind in a South African context) – cannot make a claim on us, or move or challenge us to respond to them with concrete action in the way that a person can make a claim on us. By

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California, 1990); J. D. Grainger, Alexander the Great Failure (London: Continuum, 2007). 8. Our most important source for Alexander’s life comes from the 2nd century AD historian, Arrian, who also wrote a ten-volume history of the Diadochoi. The latter work unfortunately survives only in fragments preserved by later excerptors (collected in FGH). Our knowledge of the post-Alexander period derives principally from Books 18- 21 of the 1st century BC Sicilian author, Diodorus, who, like Arrian, was dependent on earlier writers. Another overview is found in Justin

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. (…) The four characteristics of history (…) were (a) that it is scientific, or begins by asking questions, whereas the writer of legends begins by knowing something and tells what he knows; (b) that it is humanistic, or ask questions about things done by men at determinate times in the past; (c) that it is rational, or bases the answers giving by it to its questions on grounds, namely appeal to evidence; (d) that it is self–revelatory, or exists in order to tell man what man is by telling him what man has done. VII Virtuosity of the Formal and Instrumental

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in some 63 Moltmann, Der Geist des Lebens, 9. An Attempt at Reinterpreting Jesus’ Story 421 circles of believers (particularly in small churches of an exclusive nature and on the continents of Africa and South America), European Christianity is mainly theistic or in the best case, theistic and christological. It emphasizes our relationship to Jesus, as the Son of God, and to his heavenly Father. Yet, it is necessary to realize that on the ‘old continent’, we are also on the verge of a turning point, which involves a legitimate theological theme: already in

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the former. In all his considerations, Raz is indebted to the supposi- tions of law’s natural function. Again, analogically to the idea of autonomous identification of law, this belief in essential function of law is not limited to Raz alone. It is broadly spread among writers belonging to the positivist com- munity. Of course, there are some differences between them in the manner in which they describe this function: as “providing guides to human conduct” (Hart), “settlement of moral controversies” and “re- ducing the moral cost of disagreement” (Alexander and

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Africa. One may accuse her of ignoring other challenges facing Africa like women’s oppression, marginalization, and many others. I am aware that someone can research one problem at a time, and not all. In this case, both Holter and Nkabala had their opportunities to work on specific issues regarding Old Testament in Africa. More recently, Hendrik Bosman has also addressed the progress of Old Testament studies in Africa. In his article titled “The Hebrew Bible / Old Testament Studies in Africa,” with a special focus on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, he

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’. ‘Negritude’ was the key-word used by anti-colonial writers as an intellectual discourse which seeks to understand and preserve African history, culture and spirituality. Black African identity was defined, portrayed and stigmatized by colonialism, under which black people, in particular slaves and women, lived ‘under tyranny, injustice, ignorance and poverty’ 52 as well as being excluded from ‘the polis’ 53 for the reason that the criteria of classification divided the ‘human races’ into two categories: ← 135 | 136 → inferior and savage, superior and civilized, and

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Authenticity of Belief in African (Igbo) Traditional Religion | 141 → Chapter 3: African Traditional Religions and Igbo Objects of Worship 3. Introduction African traditional religions are the religions in Africa before the coming of the Europeans. Most times many writers see the religions in Africa as homogenous while others see them in plurality. In this chapter, we shall concentrate on the belief in African religions, explain why they are ‘religions’ and not ‘religion’ in homogenous sense, and narrow it down to Igbo religion: an ethnic group in Nigeria. We

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conducted. 38 In addition to these surveys, others wrote generalities about majority world mission from vantage points in the global North, 39 while some writers chose to expound on local ← 30 | 31 → expressions. 40 Conference proceedings occasionally entered the discussion. 41 The surveys and generalities were often written from the perspectives of people influenced by the North American school of thought. Broadly speaking, the North American church became the primary inheritor of the MMM in the second half of the twentieth century, 42 and the American adaptation