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necessary when we inhabit both a virtual and new physical space? What are the impacts on interaction? How do people renegotiate their sense of safety? Closeness? Intimacy or trust? Such intertwining of virtual and physical space includes internet use in pub- lic spaces as well – creating “hybrid” spaces. Some researchers explored the way in which relations between people can shift due to “practical accomplish- ments such as a Wi-Fi network in a public park” (MacKenzie 2005, 17), and some suggested that there is a tendency for “less social interaction to take place

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political trust is a rational criterion� Yet, the fact that political trust is affected by the performance of the institutions as well as identity and cultural factors shows that political trust has a social, ideo- logical and rational basis in the regions where there is intense emotional (ethnic, ideological, etc�) disintegration� Hasan Güllüpunar-Emre Ş� Aslan184 Social and Political Elements of Political Trust In the political science literature, political trust can be viewed from two main perspectives� These are the institutional theory arguing that political

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tips and marketing information. A significant reason for joining certain groups is for the connections and building of social capital. “Joining groups help sellers reach new customers with particu- lar interests and keep existing customers aware of new products or sales (Huffaker et al., 2010, p. 16). » Virtual Worlds and Social Capital Building social capital is also found in online game environments. Players in gaming communities engage in “bridging social capital—the loose connections between relative strangers that lead to diverse networks and information

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story of how the web is overturning centuries of authority structures and models of ownership, remaking our world and our cultural reality, and evolving a new virtual ‘species’—Homo Interneticus. 6 The virtual revolution has been likened to the industrial revolution—supercharging information in much the same way that steam did ← 263 | 264 → for mechanical force, accelerating the development and transmission of information, allowing anyone to publish and distribute words, images, videos and software globally, instantly and virtually for free. According to the

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move through the virtual world, just as she takes advantage of his trust and uses the money she was supposed to manage for him. The Internet medium is used to further highlight the breach of trust in the scene in which Hol logs in to the game to show the others the swearwords of Kit’s invention, which may as well be summed up by Kit’s earlier comment on Holly’s presence in his game which makes Kit feel “a little like [his] privacy has been invaded” (150). Apart from visual media like TV, cinema, and the Internet, reality in The Quarry is often conveyed and

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to a kind of anonymous orality.” Hence, Lyotard’s attack on those grand narratives which he saw as a principal strategy of authoritarian domination and the turn to a deconstruction of texts and of history of such prominent contemporary critics such as Derrida and Foucault. In the process of describing a nonfoundational, “writerly” text, these critics seem to anticipate the floating unmoored virtual world, with its anonymous authors and its shifting forms. The postmodern solution to the social/narrative problem seems to me to be an exercise in wishful thinking. It

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(source: web site). 44 per cent of these students were attending online courses. Many of the virtual universities are organised an a corporate model. UNext, the Stanford, Chicago and LSE venture, for instance, presented itself as an "Internet education company." The corporate model typically implies tight management of production efficiency, part-time staff instead of tenure, students treated as customers, little or no research, and a policy explicitly aiming at the whole world as its market. While the virtual university still only occupies a rather marginal

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Filibeli discusses the state of (dis)information sphere by exemplifying the very current incidents within the digital threats and searches for reasons for the rise of fact-checkers all around the world with a comparative analysis of 223 fact-checking initiatives. Sarphan Uzunoğlu and Ahmet Alphan Sabancı in their chapter provide the critique of contemporary uses of the term “fake news,” and focus on how fake news debate is politically manipulated by taking Slavoj Žižek’s and Raph Keyes’ arguments into consideration. Following chapters of Can Ertuna and Emre Kızılkaya

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Rothstein regarded the 11 September terrorist attack as a challenge to postmodernists and found that this destruction “seems to cry out for a transcendent ethical perspective” (see Hammond 2004). Julia Keller in the Chicago Tribune found that “the end of postmodernism” had arrived, as no postmodernist could possibly retain his views and at the same time “acknowledge the reality of a plane hitting a tower” (see Fish 2002: 28). The terrorist attack was thus seen as the invasion of a clear and indisputably objective reality into the vague world of postmodern

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who appear to be different from us. The proximity provided by the raft (a plausible metaphor for our globalised world) allowed for social and cultural differences to be noticed and also for interconnectedness, revealing the possibility of mutual trust and understanding between Huck and Jim, contemporary boys and girls, and men and women. Reading in a foreign language compels us to rethink what we assume to be familiar about our own cultures, our beliefs, and understandings of others. Globalisation demands a complete review of concepts, such as borders, culture