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the Bollingen Prize. • Toni Morrison, African–American novelist noted for her depiction of and reflection on the experiences of African–Americans and women, who in 1993 became the first African–American and the second woman to win the Nobel Prize. • Ezra Pound, modernist poet and critic who helped edit and promote the top writers of the early 20th century, and whose masterpiece, The Cantos, •VYGOTSKY & CREATIVITY• 152 which interweaves personal and historical narrative with lyric poetry, con- tinues to be discussed and debated in colleges. • Philip Roth

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of Anna Julia Cooper’s work to promote education for disenfranchised African Americans. All four women shared a desire to promote progressive pedagogy. The actions of many dedicated women in the early 20th century played a crucial role in ushering new and progressive forms of education into America’s classrooms. Progressive education, while not easily defined, emerged during a time of great social transition in the United States in the late 1800s. Women such as Jane Add- ams and her settlement house movement were at the forefront of societal reforms Beyond

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for his incredibly generous editorial guidance and critical feedback. Thanks also to the ref- erees whose insights informed my revision. I am most appreciative of the encouragement and construc- tive critique of Cindi Katz, Michelle Fine, and Roger Hart on earlier drafts of this paper. This work was supported by a fellowship from the American Association of University Women and a CUNY Writing Fellowship at Medgar Evers College. Notes 1. For websites see Youth Together 2006 www.youthtogether.net; Kids as Self Advocates 2007 www.fvkasa.org/; CAAAV Youth Leadership

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. Intervention in School and Clinic, 48, 108. Fenning, P., & Rose, J. (2007). Overrepresentation of African American students in exclusionary discipline: The role of school policy. Urban Education, 42(6), 536–559. Freire, P. (1970/2002). Pedagogy of the oppressed (Myra Bergman Ramos, Trans). New York: Continuum. Freire, P., & Macedo, D. (1987). Literacy: Reading the word and the world. London: Routledge. Fuentes, A. (2011). Lockdown high: When the schoolhouse becomes a jailhouse. London: Verso. Giroux, H. (2006). The Giroux reader: Cultural politics and the promise of

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engaging in my doctoral studies at the University of Mas- sachusetts-Amherst in the Social Justice Education Program, I and Lisa D. Robinson, another student in the program, interviewed several undergraduate students of African heritage and Jewish European heritage at the university to accumulate information focusing on the question, “What is the relationship on campus between African American heritage and Jewish European heritage students?” The results from this sample showed that there was tension, conflict, and misunderstanding on campus between the two groups

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Spanish-language, and ethnic (both Latina/o and African American) media. In addition, most media literacy programs target youth and it is difficult to find curricula designed for adults. Finally, except for the work of Bondy and Pennington (2016), LeGrande and Vargas (2001), Boske and McCormack (2011), and Vargas (2006, 2009), there are few studies that examine media literacy among Latina/os.1 In this chapter, I focus on media literacy about and for Latina/os within informal and formal educational contexts. First, I explore my experience designing and piloting a

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ways? I draw on a qualitative study conducted at a predominantly white, elite research university on the West Coast in the spring and summer of 2010. My study’s six participants (highly placed faculty and staff ) were recruited using purposive and reputational/theory-based sampling (Patton, 2002; Wong, 2008). The partici- pants were highly diverse (Asian American, African American, white, and Latino men and women) and directly identified as empowerment agents by minority stu- dents. Data collection involved a life history interview approach (Atkinson, 1998

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miserably failing school when my methods were dearly having a positive effect on student engagement and achievement. My students, predominantly of African, Latin American, and Southeast Asian descent, did well in my classes, particularly the students that most of my colleagues complained about as unruly and unmotivated. Parents liked the work I was doing with their children. I believed, wrongly I guess, that the people involved with Westlake Junior High expected me to push and challenge all students. That belief persisted despite my better wisdom from having attended

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Fine and Weis of fer a word of caution to researchers whose work is located in challenging contexts. They highlight the research- ers’ responsibility in representing ‘the pain and suf fering in communities and the incredible resilience and energy that percolates.’58 They recognise 50 Stuhlmiller, C.M. op. cit. (2001), p. 67. 51 Palmer, P.J. (1983). To Know As We Are Known. New York: Harper Collins Publishers, p. 8. 52 Ibid. 53 Ibid. 54 Ibid. 55 Ibid. 56 Ibid. 57 Etter-Lewis, G. (1996). ‘Telling From Behind Her Hand, African American Women and the Process of

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women thus occurs in a field already marked with the designs and biases written into it by coloni- alism… Consequently, awareness of this legacy […] needs itself to be the starting point of any such investigation. (Ahmed, 1993, p. 45). As Mr and Mrs Bush’s pseudo-feminist designs on Afghanistan prove, such an undertaking – in a world where much of the Western Left is totally ignorant as to how to express its solidarity with the Middle East in its struggle against American and Israeli domination – is more pressing today than ever before. In the West, the thorough