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Writers Association. He has also contributed to the Chinese literary world as:  an editorial member of The Critical Reviews of Contemporary Writing China 5 (当代作家評論); the General Secretary of the Liaoning Provincial Writers’ Association and as the Chief of Literature, of the Department of the Chinese Literary Foundation and he also published various periodicals in China. Qi Liu subsequently was a Visiting Research Fellow at Duke University in the USA and Senior Advisor of the Central American Foundation (USCF). The diary began during his elementary school

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Hitler since ‚Nature‛ was at work every day. “Honour thy father and thy mother,” however, took on immense importance since Aryan parents were the propagators of Hitler’s sacred race. Weikart notes, ‚On Mother’s Day in 1939 about three million *German+ women received their medallions *the German Mother’s Cross+: bronze for four children, silver for six children, and gold for eight or more children. Hitler Youth were instructed to snap to attention and salute women wearing their medals‛ (130). Conclusion 159 “Thou shalt not kill.” Hitler’s murder of millions

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characters in a wide range of roles. From a global perspective there are several high quality picture-books which feature the stories of some prominent women, for example, Amelia Earhart, Queen Elizabeth II, Harriet Tubman, Wangari Maathai and Rosa Parks. Known as the ‘Mother of the Civil Rights Movement’, Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (4 February, 1913–24 October, 2005) was an African- American civil rights activist. On 1 December, 1955 in Montgomery, Alabama, Rosa Parks, aged forty-two, refused to obey bus driver James Blake’s order that she give up her seat to make

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translation. True to the third term of its mission statement (“Passionate, Dis- cerning, Inclusive”), Serious Eats is an inclusive community. Accord- ing to quantcast, the most reliable source of non-proprietary measures of website traffic, Serious Eats is broadly representative of the general U.S. audience on the internet (though it skews slightly more female; moderately older, better-educated and higher-income; and markedly more Asian-American and less African-American). Perhaps more sig- nificantly, it covers the entire gamut of food

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complicity in relation to colonialism as well as their possible negation of or resistance to it. At the same time, they emphasize the role of European women as relevant cultural agents in the formation of imperial relationships (Bassnett 2002; García Ramón 2002; McEwan 2000; Melman 1992; Monicat 1996). To talk of Orientalism in Spain we must refer, first of all, to the no- tion of Africanism, or more precisely of “marroquismo” (Abel and Cer- arols 2008; Martín Corrales et al. 2002; Morales Lezcano 2006; Nogué et al. 1999), because the Spanish Orient, since the end

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  apparent  benefits  to  prospective  home  buyers,  especially  minorities who previously had been denied equal credit.   However,  deregulation  fostered  an  unusual  combination  of  hazards.  African  Americans  and  Latinos  were  disproportionately  targeted  for  subprime  loans  (which  were  unsustainable  by  design),  continuing  a  long  history  of  discrimination  in  banking  and  real  estate  (Schloemer  et  al.  2006).  The  selective  weight  of  these  losses  for  ethnic  minority families has contributed significantly to the “racial wealth gap”  and

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Keys, to ‘build mutual solidarity’ with other causes.14 Events with an international dimension gradually took a greater importance in the programme of the commem- oration weekend. They dealt with topics as diverse as Palestine, Israel, Chile, Guantanamo, Cuba, the Basque Country, the Vietnam War, the war in Iraq, Nuremberg, South Africa, African-American ghettos in the United States, and the massacre of Algerian demonstrators in France in 1961. Sometimes, the connection with foreign issues could even be one of the main themes of the commemoration, as for

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, A Tradition Falls, and Women Rise’, in New York Times, 17 January 2010. Berman, Marshall, All That’s Solid Melts into Air: The Experience of Modernity (London: Verso, 1991). Bieder, Maryellen, ‘A Case of Altered Identity: Two Editions of Juan Goytisolo’s Señas de identidad’, in Modern Language Notes 89 (1974), 298–310. Bizub, Edward, Proust et le moi divisé. La Recherche: creuset de la pyschologie expéri- mentale 1874–1914 (Paris: Droz, 2006). Black, Stanley, Juan Goytisolo; The Poetics of Contagion (Liverpool: Liverpool Uni- versity Press, 2001). Blakey

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see Jesus […] (Heb. 2:6–9) It is interesting reading these words against a backdrop of the frequently expressed criticism that scientists overreach themselves and act as if they were gods, masters of their fate and of the destiny of all around them. These days it is biomedical scientists who may come in for this criticism. And yet the biblical writers who penned these words, admittedly writing 234 Chapter 9 aeons before the advent of the modern technological era, did not appear to think in anything resembling these terms. For them, the grandeur of the human

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always, at least in principle, could have been ascribed differently. This contingency sometimes takes the shape of enthusiasm with re- gards to the possibility of subverting categories, and thus fundamentally chang- ing social reality, a point that is clearly echoed in Soja’s account of the African American cultural critic and academic, bell hooks, who according to Soja has: ... consciously chosen to envelope and develop this marginality, as hooks puts it, as a space of radical openness, a context from which to build communities of resistance and renewal that