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313806_-14 ·7· Queer Other We have so much to learn from each other. There are better ways, they keep telling me, capitalism is not the only way. We haven’t nearly exhausted all the possibilities, they say. We know that the future depends on everyone working together. K. Sello Duiker, The Quiet Violence of Dreams To a Happier Year Summertime ’s first notebook fragment, with John’s exclamation over the perilous men under whose thumb he finds himself after returning to South Africa, bears an italicised note at its end, a writer’s

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Agency in Female Rappers.” Dissertation, University of Michigan, 2005. Bell-Scott, Patricia, and Juanita Johnson-Bailey. Flat-Footed Truths: Telling Black Women’s Lives . 1st ed. New York: Henry Holt, 1998. Berlant, Lauren Gail. The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship . Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1997. “Blacks in South Africa Protest Whites-Only Beach.” The Virginian-Pilot and the Ledger Star , September 4, 1989, A5. Blay, Yaba. (1)ne Drop: Shifting the Lens on Race . BLACKprint Press, 2013. Bobo, Jacqueline. Black

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conducted. 38 In addition to these surveys, others wrote generalities about majority world mission from vantage points in the global North, 39 while some writers chose to expound on local ← 30 | 31 → expressions. 40 Conference proceedings occasionally entered the discussion. 41 The surveys and generalities were often written from the perspectives of people influenced by the North American school of thought. Broadly speaking, the North American church became the primary inheritor of the MMM in the second half of the twentieth century, 42 and the American adaptation

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. Soyinka, Wole. Idanre and Other Poems. London: Methuen, 1969. ____Myth, Literature and the African World. London: Cambridge University Press, 1976. ____The Road. London: Oxford University Press, 1965. Standish, Peter, (ed.). Dictionary of Twentieth Century Culture: Hispanic Culture of South America. Detroit: Manly/Gale, 1995. pp.156–7. Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Uncle Tom’s Cabin. London: Dent, 1909. Styron, William. The Confessions of Nat Turner. New York: Random House, 1967. Tate, Claudia. ‘Toni Morrison’. Black Women Writers at Work. Claudia Tate (ed.). New

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(2), July 2012. Rody, Caroline: The Daughter’s Return: African-American and Caribbean Women’s Fictions of History . Oxford University Press: New York 2001. Rüther, Kirsten / Schaser, Angelika / van Gent, Jaqueline: Gender and Conversion Narratives in the Nineteenth Century. German Mission at Home and Abroad . Routledge: London, 2015. Schlarb, Cornelia: Women in the Reformation Period Female reformers – reformers’ wives – Women who acted for reformation , 2016, retrieved 10.02.2017, from http://www.theologinnenkonvent.de/pdf/Women_in_the_Reformation_Period_3

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centrality of author, experience, and historical context; and by questioning the idea of canon, tradition, and interpretation—entities of key importance to black feminist criticism. Pointing out how this new theory surfaced “just when the literature of peoples of color, black women, Latin Americans, and Africans began to move to ‘the center,’” she argued that this literature, which was overtly political in its description of reality, was being deliberately “preempted by [the] new Western concept which proclaimed that reality does not exist,” diverting its analyses into

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70s and on. 3. See Patricia Jones-Jackson, When Roots Die; Melville J. Herskovits, The Myth of the Negro Past; Marion Kraft, The African Continuum and Contemporary African American Writers: Their Literary Presence and Ancestral Past; Maureen Warner-Lewis, Guinea’s Other Suns, Trinidad Yoruba and Central Africa in the Caribbean ; Robert Farris Thompson, Flash of the Spirit; Edward Kamau Brathwaite, History of the Voice; John W. Pulis (ed.) Religion, Diaspora and Cultural Identity: A Reader in the Anglophone Caribbean; Albert J. Raboteau, Slave Religion: The

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, and interpretation—entities of key importance to black feminist criticism. Pointing out how this new theory surfaced “just when the literature of peoples of color, black women, Latin Americans, and Africans began to move to ‘the center,’” she argued that this literature, which was overtly political in its description of reality, was being deliberately “preempted by [the] new Western concept which proclaimed that reality does not exist,” diverting its analyses into discussions of the new literary theory or creating language that would obscure rather than

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–515. Print. ---. South African National Cinema. London and New York: Routledge, 2007. Print. “Making Tsotsi.” Tsotsi: The Official Film Site. 6 June 2009. Web. “Maori Women in Focus.” Ministry of Women’s Affairs. April 1999. Web. 25 June 2007. Marchetti, Gina. “Action-Adventure as Ideology.” Cultural Politics in Contem porary America. Ed. Ian Angus and Sut Jhally. New York: Routledge, 1989. 182-197. Print. Margetts, Jayne. “Deepa’s Doctine.” Celluloid Interview. 4 February 2010. Web. Marks, Laura. The Skin of the Film: Intercultural Cinema, Embodiment, and

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Memphis Minnie may be taken as a female exception to this male-dominated model. On one hand, these performers were often marginal even in their own communities as their allegedly “sinful”, commercial and instinct-liberating alternative lifestyles contrasted with the religious correctness of “respectable” African American citizens and communities. As such, they can be considered outsiders—labeled deviants who cannot be trusted to live by the rules enforced by the hegemonic groups (Becker, 1963, p. 1). Writer Robert Palmer (1982, p. 17) explains that the majority of men