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more in the text than the former being its originator. It is in “the dialogic struggle and collaboration of the two” (Brooks, quoted by Stoltzfus, 4) that the literary work gets concretized. In this respect, Lacanian literary criticism might well be understood as the epitome of literary criticism per se. Literary Studies and American Literature84 It is worth adding here that in light of the Lacanian thought the textuality (of the unconscious), where there exists the potential for the encounter between the writer and the reader, is often spoken of in

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the way in which men regarded the land dur- ing the first stages of settlement and colonization. The sexualized im- aginative geographies of American settlement are echoed in other co- lonial contexts (the Orient portrayed as a sexual place, Africa as a land characterized in sexual terms).98 Sexualized imaginative geographies have legitimated colonial acts and power relations. Alison Blunt has a major role in the theorization and practice of contemporary feminist geography, concerned as she is with gender issues in imperial travel writing, especially developed

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reality and imagi- nation … that can cast a spell on us.” Zbigniew Maszewski’s essay “Tomás Rivera’s Vignettes and the Tradition of American Modernist Fiction: Hemingway and Faulkner” traces correspondences between Tomás Rivera’s collection of short stories and vignettes …y no se lo tragó la tierra/…And the Earth Did Not Devour Him (1971) and two modernist master- pieces: Ernest Hemingway’s In Our Time and William Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying. Contrary to his predecessors, two mainstream White Anglo-Saxon Protestant writers, Tomás Rivera (born in 1930 when the other

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.) (2005). From the Delta. Dhaka: University Press. ——. (ed.) (2006). Didima’s Necklace and Other Stories. Dhaka: Writers. Ink. ——. (ed.) (2007). Arshilata: Women’s Fiction from India and Bangladesh. Dhaka: writer’s ink. ——. and A. Farrukhi (eds) (2008). Fault Lines: Stories of 1971. Dhaka: University Press. ——. Farrukhi, A. and Hussain, S. (eds) (2000). Colonial and Post-Colonial Encoun- ters. New Delhi: Manohar. Gender Issues Acharya, M. (2001). The Ramayana for Young Readers. New Delhi: Harper. American Bible Society, The Holy Bible: Revised King James Version. New

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through their writers across national borders. How might such a course look? Ann Smith (2000) offers an instructive early example from the 1990s. She discusses her teaching of “The Lesbian in Literature” course at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannes- burg, South Africa, in the spring of 1995. Smith taught one British and three American texts: Radclyffe Hall’s novel The Well of Loneliness (1928), Lillian Designing and Teaching “Introduction to LGBT Literature” 51 Hellman’s play The Children’s Hour (1934), Audre Lorde’s memoir Zami: A New Spelling of My

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wealthy woman from the upper echelons of American society, in TWICE A YEAR Norman attempted to provide a journal that would be engaged with art and politics, democratic ethics and their abuses, trades union politics, civil liberties, including ethnic, women’s and children’s issues, discussions of the New World Order emerging from the Bretton Woods Agreement and the rise of the United Nations in the context of Cold War. Like Dwight Macdonald, she pro- vided a wartime, trans-Atlantic home for European writers. Much more than Macdonald Norman attempted to create and

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). Coming Home 41 and nothing about Africa. But very soon, he is forced to admit that his certainty that the past did not matter is progressively shattered by the masks and Mrs Rutherford’s evocation of African rites: They looked so full of spite, evoking vague stories of primitive violence. They forced me to connect the smudged photograph and Swami’s death, and, before that, the rape of Amerindian women, malarial fever, the drowning of my Dutch prede- cessors and the

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British intellectuals after the Spanish Civil War. Auden’s first American poetic works were not dissimilar to Huxley’s paci- fist, meditative and mystical proposals. § 33. Huxley II: The wasted youth of the 1920s 255/I that gradually became hegemonic, that of a writer espousing pacifism, therefore political inertia, having passed through ‘Life-Worship’.16 § 33. Huxley II: The wasted youth of the 1920s Huxley’s first four novels, which came out close to one another from 1921 to 1928, form a unified discourse, and take stock of Britain’s educated well-off society

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old seaports of England began to control the North Atlantic trading network, which encom- passed, most importantly, the coastal factories in West Africa, the colo- nial settlements in the Caribbean, and the numerous ports situated on the North American coast (Klein 2004, 100). The different regions of the First British Empire, largely an empire of the sea, were connected to each other by the increasing flow of men and women, commodities and ideas along English trade routes, yielding a complex network of “dis- parate but interrelated centres” (Wilson 2004, 16

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Irish Narrative and Filmic Discourses of Dysfunction Marisol Morales-Ladrón Portraits of Dysfunction in Contemporary Irish Women’s Narratives: Confined to the Cell, Lost to Memory ‘Wherever there is Ireland there is the Family; and it counts for a great deal’ –G. K. Chesterton abstract: The present chapter looks at how dysfunction has been represented in the literature produced by Irish women writers since the 1980s. In the novels under discus- sion, dysfunction is defined in terms of the disclosure of a traumatic event that originated in the past but