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Agamben, 1998, p. 142), technology is a key part of the contemporary bio- political design. Given this strong symbiosis between biopolitics and technology, any belief that information and communication technologies (ICTs) would enable users to achieve a state of disembodiment in which only the virtual body, as some kind of liberal Cartesian end-product, would matter comes across as rather unpersuasive. According to Megan Boler (2007, p. 139): In digital Cartesianism, although the body is allegedly ‘transcended’ in virtual envi- ronments according to the hypes and

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sociological perspective and in designing, creating and controlling information systems. At FDV Faculty it is possible to study sociology in several Master curricula due to different subject programmes like the sociology of everyday life, European social policy analysis, criticism of sexism as contemporary tradition, and social work in the community. These diverse curricula, generally oriented towards a 4 + 1 system of the Bologna implementation, not only show a specialization of the FDV in the sociology of everyday life and in gender studies as well, but also the

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consider this reality from an excessively Eurocentric journalistic perspective. Spanish media show contemporary migrations as an immigratory process, a process of arrival. It is hardly ever considered as emigratory (departing their home countries) or, even less, migratory (without arrival or departure). The media does not examine the immigration process by looking at the area or country of departure and the, predominantly, economic causes which motivate emigration to Spain. It also isn’t looked at as a fluctuating or migrating process. The arrivals are always alarming

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expertise, through which they "make up" new consumers as well as new types of employ- ees for themselves, in order to meet their financial goals. Probing mar- keting functions, thereby become the major focus of an organisation, what Deleuze calls 'the soul of a corporation' (du Gay 2000: 71-72). What's more, personalised marketing techniques that organisations enlist bring markets into the private worlds of the consumers as well as em- ployees with all the unanticipated consequences of such deregulations. As conflicting demands, lack of recognition and trust persist

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bloggers included in this chapter are not from former socialist countries, but there is every reason to assume that internet-savvy people in transforming societies use online spaces for self-, and sexual-exploration and community related practices as much as anyone else. In the globalising, internet-connected world, struggling with the continuing occurrence of moral panics, it is important to understand how and whether ‘virtual’ online experiences inform our identities. This would mean that an aspect of our lives often considered playful (online communication

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frame memory transmission. Ontological security is a feeling of being at home in the world and it includes an ele- ment of trust in concrete and generalized others and an element of finding meaning in life. Family interactions may contribute to these factors by maintaining a secure, caring emotional climate or may result in insecurity, lacking confidence and loss of meaning, if elementary processes of recognition are missing (Honneth 1996). Identity is constructed in communicative interactions in the sense that the oth- ers’ feedback serves as ground for relating

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.” But what is an event? Is it just something that happens? Or is it something that makes new things happen, disturbing the order of what we do, the cer- tainty of how we perceive the world and ourselves? Philosophers of the event have seen it as a glimpse into the unreachable, the yet to come (Nietzsche 1990); a transgression of the limitations of the possible (Foucault 1963); a flash in the greyness of the virtual worlds that surround us. (Deleuze 2001) As Deleuze has poetically put it: “The event is not what occurs (an accident), it is rather inside what

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dramas of Schiller and his contemporaries, we have a series of sustained inquiries into the possibilities of political life in the age, first of princely absolutism, then of the French Revolution, and the liberating but also ter- rifying possibilities it opened up. Political life, like social life in general, depends on trust. But where trust exists, so does the possibility of its betrayal. Betrayal must by definition be abnormal. If it were the norm, the bonds of society would be dissolved. I have a moral obligation to keep my promises, to tell the truth, to

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Jerusalem. The economic and cultural “ecosphere” that accompanies this global perspective insistently points to the large-scale, boundary-crossing landscapes we live in. Our global cities are multicultural; our nations are part of larger transnational regionalities; our sensus communis is hardwired through digital connections; our sovereignty is ceded to global multinational corporations, the World Bank, the IMF. (Bhabha, 2015, p. x) In the case of contemporary hybridity therefore, Bhabha argues, “empowerment is about the achievement of agency and authority, rather

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the “distinctive” and the inherently utilitarian dimensions of objects. In everyday discussions, as well as in contemporary scholarly analysis, it is quite common to offer systematic explanations in terms of pursuit of status. Let me just give two examples. Imposing SUVs are frequently perceived as inappropriate within large cities and many commentators are prone to consider them essentially in terms of social distinction. Yet, a comparative perspective shows that they provide a relative protec- tion in many places where car accidents, and even risks of