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Expanding the Gothic Canon | 287 → Index of Names and Titles A Aarseth, Espen, 274 Actes and Monuments , see Foxe, John Addison, Joseph, 16 Aguirre, Manuel, 153, 156, 159 Aiken, Joan, 214 Ghostly Beasts , 214 Aikin, Anna Laetitia, 27 "On the Pleasure Derived from Objects of Terror", 27 "Sir Bertrand, A Fragment", 27 Aikin, John, 27 Alan Wake (game), 279 Alien (film), 38, 252 Almond, David, 194, 202–6, 215 Kit’s Wilderness , 194, 202–6 Alone in the Dark (game), 279 Altick, Richard D., 88 Altman, Rick, 280 American Horror Story, Murder House (TV series), 247

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his writing and the more avant-garde aesthetic of John Ashbery’s Language poetry, for example. There are, in other words, ← 3 | 4 → divisions in the critical contexts of the ‘American Muldoon’ that are not dissimilar to the Irish situation, although the underlying debates and contexts are also specific to the literary culture of the poet’s chosen home country. In her review of The Annals of Chile , Helen Vendler commented on how considering his poetics as experimental in the Irish context can be counterbalanced against the ‘formal sophistication’ that an Irish

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policy of the powerful oil companies. The fourth topic, the Greening of Canada, is related to the Canadian myth of innocence (in opposition to the European tradition), which is sometimes, yet not always challenged by the cultural consciousness and political ruthlessness of the American neighbours. The re-evaluation of the indigenous past, which is relevant to Canada’s recent literature (from Ruby Wiebe’s fiction onwards), recalls images of an Edenic landscape, uncorrupted by European colonisation. Indeed the next instance to be dealt with in the volume is the colour

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Barry, one can cite, amongst others, Angelica Kauffmann, J. M. W. Turner, J. A. D. Ingres, Francois Gerard, Nicolas Abildgaard, Philipp Otto Runge, even, some would argue, Caspar David Friedrich. Much of that work is very well known and it provides an opportunity for an institution such as the National Galleries of Scotland to discharge its duty to Scottish culture on an international stage. Bearing in mind that the American John Trumbull, whose most famous work, The Declaration of Independence , is on permanent display in the Capitol Building in Washington, is also

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played off on all alike. 7 Since Howe wrote the last quarter of the book after receiving the wound of Garrison’s criticism, she herself was able to intervene in forming later public reaction to her alleged callousness. Chapter 18, called “Slavery—Cuban Slave Laws, Institutions, Etc.,” is clearly a response to censure of her earlier brittleness and putative views. Howe, in a notably different tone, begins this chapter by lamenting her countrymen’s self-righteous posturing: “We Americans, caught by the revolutionary spirit of the French, make them too much our models

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out, somewhere beyond Cape Spear lies Dublin and the Irish Coast; far away but still the nearest land, and closer now than is Toronto or Detroit, to say nothing of North America’s more western cities […] (MacLeod 2001: 118-119). Too long to be quoted in its entirety (two entire pages), the passage implies the presence of a human figure looking at a landscape from a vantage point that allows the observer an extremely deep and wide perspective: “It is all of this that I see now, standing at the final road’s end”. The visual choreography is similar to that of some

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Literature and Spirituality in the English-Speaking World The Lives of a Spirit: Mystical Bewilderment in Fanny Howe’s Fiction Bénédicte C HORIER -F RYD University of Poitiers, France The initial decision of the spiritual is the decision to leave. (Michel de Certeau, 1992: 177) Fanny Howe is a widely acclaimed American poet and more confidential novelist and writer of short stories and essays. 1 She is also, in her own words, a “Catholic atheist.” How does this paradox find an expression in her writing? Her fiction resonates with the questions that haunt her

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cultural need for teaching English (or American) literature. The combined pressures of positivism and of market-oriented pragmatism place the study of all foreign literatures in a difficult position. Their predicament is compounded by the fact that the studies of foreign literatures, unlike that of Romanian literature, cannot be easily appropriated to nationalist agendas either. The dominant trend towards an uncritical acceptance of the logic of the marketplace and the excessively pragmatic evaluation of English studies in terms of the jobs that they can secure has had

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Green Canada | 289 → Notes on Contributors Giuseppina Botta holds a Ph.D in English and American Literature and a Master in Translation Studies. She has been part-time lecturer at the University of Salerno between 2008 and 2010. She has published articles on Margaret Atwood and Steven Heighton. She translated into Italian Atwood’s collection of poems The Door (with Eleonora Rao, 2007). Elena Baldassarri is assistant professor in North American History at Roma Tre University. Her research interests focus on Canadian and United States history. Her most recent

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Institute in Germany. ←385 |  386→ Oana Cogeanu teaches English literature, cultural studies, and translation studies at “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University of Iași, Romania. She authored an Introduction to African-American Travel Literature (2013); edited collections on cultural studies ( Wounded Bodies, Wounded Minds , 2014) and intercultural issues ( Travel and Intercultural Communication in Europe , 2016). Dr. Cogeanu has published articles on a range of authors and topics, with a special interest in African-American literature and a constant focus on travel