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at the same time subverted these conventions to make the film more complex. With the mixture of influences and the large scope of the production, the film raised discussion on the Irishness of the more internationally- oriented Irish cinema of the 1990s. Fintan O’Toole pondered the question of Irish national cinema in The Irish Times: If it has done nothing else, Neil Jordan’s Michael Collins has certainly raised in the most immediate way the whole question of what is Irish about Irish cinema? Having your first great national epic made by a Hollywood studio

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society: first ← 111 | 112 → is the notion that the electorate believes politicians hold office as a public trust, and second that politics is an honorable and commendable profession. But does the scene represent reality or Hollywood’s version of the U.S. Congress? On second thought, Hollywood has not always been kind to the presidency either. Recent Hollywood presidents, such as Bill Pullman fighting alien invaders in Independence Day (1996) or Harrison Ford socking it to hijackers who have taken over his plane in Air Force One (1997), reinforce a macho image

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races planning to open a business together, that is out of harmony with the reality of that time. However, neither of these films nor the historic 1954 desegregation decision in Brown v. Board of Education 6 advanced the cause of integration within the film industry as much as did the arrival in Hollywood of a young actor named Sidney Poitier. Born in Miami but raised in the Bahamas, Poitier grew up with no electricity or indoor plumbing. As a boy he received an elementary education that allowed him to read at a fourth grade level, which makes his rise to stardom

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looser, less functionalist perspective that “…sees each example as having unique characteristics which cannot be categorized into a universal schema and consider(s) it impossible to establish universal laws in the area being considered” (p. 2). An idiographic (IDC) approach to Hollywood is thus “…derived from what is observed, not imposed on it” (p. 7). Findings from an idiographic approach such as Mark Litwak’s Reel Power. The Struggle for Influence and Success in the New Hollywood (1987) tends to give greater priority to the representative anecdote which, as we

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release, as it enables them to maximize profits over a short period of time and before any bad ← 64 | 65 → word-of-mouth or critical review thwarts their business plan. Moreover, in a Hollywood world dominated by the race for market shares, overnight success is an asset that will also raise the value of films in ancillary markets, 9 while immediately increasing studio stock price on the stock exchange – much to the satisfaction of the conglomerates that now control almost all studios. American films at the turn of the century By the end of the twentieth century, US

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negotiation, compromise and peace, and portrays de Valera as the one unwilling to compromise, the one responsible for the Civil War. Interestingly, though Eamon de Valera had earlier enjoyed the status of a revered figure in Ireland, his negative portrayal did not raise much controversy or criticism but was instead widely accepted. Evidently Jor- dan’s generation and younger people were ready to debunk old myths and shibboleths and look for new definitions of Irishness in the changing situation of the 1990s, even if the older generations may still have had a

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construed as a critique of the capitalist system. The story of Joe Morse’s rise from ghetto to Wall Street raises the moral question of whether it is possible to become financially successful within the capitalist system without becoming corrupted by it. 41 This is not an inappropriate interpretation of the film since it was the collaboration of political leftist Abraham Polonsky, who directed and did the screenplay, and liberal actor John Garfield’s independent company, Enterprise Productions. Both men came under the scrutiny of HUAC during the Hollywood hearings

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hosts a yearly, paid-admission Day of the Dead event, as well as a summer schedule of outdoor movie screenings. Other cemeteries and non-traditional locations may also be looking for ways to raise money for maintenance, perhaps in partnership with a civic-minded non-profit. A party that offers a look “behind the scenes” also offers news value. A party on a Hollywood studio lot still gives a feeling of being an insider, if just for a night. The partygoer drives up to the gate and for once is waved through by security, because his name is “on the list.” Paramount, Sony

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Alexa Weik von Mossner Roland Emmerich’s The Day After Tomorrow (2004) Much as it was criticized at the time of its release in 2004, Roland Emmerich’s The Day After Tomorrow1 holds a special status within the emerging genre of cli-fi cinema. Despite its many scientific inaccuracies, the movie stands out as the first Hollywood mega-blockbuster that self-consciously was about climate change rather than just using a climatically changed environment as narrative setting and background. Other climate-themed films such as Bong Joon-ho’s Snowpiercer2 and George

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the issues ← 135 | 136 → raised in a film such as The Day After Tomorrow is to teach it in a way that encourages critical discussion. While educators might shy away from Emmerich’s film due to its attention-grabbing and formulaic storytelling, its combination of memorable imagery and overt environmentalist ethical stance make it an ideal teaching subject, be it in the university classroom or in the realm of (public) science education. Sylvia Mayer suggests that teaching environmentalist Hollywood movies – even movies that shamelessly exploit scientific scenarios