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): 133–149. Gates, Henry Louis, Jr. The Signifying Monkey: A Theory of African-American Literary Criticism. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988. Gaunt, David. “Heat and Light”. A Review. Books+Publishing 3 (2014): 22. Gelder, Ken. “The Obscure(d) World of Australian Popular Fiction”. Australian Book Review 222 (2000): 34–38. ——, and Jane M. Jacobs. Uncanny Australia: Sacredness and Identity in a Postcolonial Nation. Carlton South, Victoria: Melbourne University Press, 1998. Genette, Gérard. The Architext: An Introduction. Trans. Jane E. Lewin. Berkeley

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, Vincent. “Le Procès de Shamgorod d’Elie Wiesel: ‘Imaginer’ l’inimaginable mal,” in Myriam Watthee-Delmotte and Paul-Augustin Deproost (eds.), Imaginaires du mal. Paris: Cerf, 2000, pp. 255-263. ERLL, Astrid. “Wars We Have Seen: Literature as a Medium of Collective Memory in the ‘Age of Extremes,’” in Elena Lamberti and Vita Fortunati (eds.), Memories and Representations of War: The Case of World War I and World War II. Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi, 2009, pp. 27-43. EYERMAN, Ron. “Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity,” ch. 3

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, Straus & Giroux, 1998). ———, & Jason Wilson, ed. Best American Travel Writing (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2005). King, Reyahn et al. Ignatius Sancho: An African Man of Letters (London: National Portrait Gallery, 1997). Kramer, Janet. “Liberty, Equality, Sorority,” New Yorker (29 May 2000): 112–23. Krauss, Rosalind. Formless (New York: Zone, 1997). Kumin, Maxine. Women, Animals and Vegetables: Essays and Stories (Toronto: Ontario Review Press, 2001). Kundera, Milan. The Curtain: An Essay in Seven Parts, tr. Linda Asher (London: HarperCollins, 2007). ———. The

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his chapter entitled ‘Anthologizing Africa’, points firstly to the editor’s protest on the limitations of space in the twelve anthologies of modern African poetry, all published in England and America, which Lefevere studies in this chapter. He remarks that ‘publishers invest in a number of pages because they publish for a potential audience’ (1992: 124) and points to their reluctance to ‘invest too many pages in anthologies of African poetry’, which would be a minority interest. Although the audi- ence is small, the publishers will try to get as many

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Bibliography Aldritt, Keith, David Jones: Writer and Artist (London: Constable, 2003). Allchin, A. M., ‘On Not Knowing Welsh: David Jones and the Matter of Wales’, David Jones: Diversity in Unity: Studies in his Literary and Visual Art, Belinda Humphrey and Anne Price-Owen, eds (Cardif f: University of Wales Press, 2000), 75–82. Allitt, Patrick, Catholic Converts: British and American Intellectuals Turn to Rome (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977). Balthasar, Hans Urs von, Epilogue, trans. by Edward T. Oakes (San Francisco: Igna- tius, 2004). Barker

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. Despite this caveat, the contextualisation of A Vision with spiritu- alist phenomena remains an important aspect for discussion. After all, the spiritualist movement began the practice of automatic writing. However, the background of twentieth-century spiritualism and the appropriation of techniques by laymen and -women, presents a very different cultural environment than that of the Fox sisters in nineteenth-century America. Recent critics have linked this resurgence of spiritualism to the trauma of the Great War: The experiences of the trenches eluded

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significant works of cultural theory as well. Equally importantly, as the first major African-American and later one of the few openly gay writers working in the field—the latter treated in his brilliant and complex Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand (1984), a work that reads as an elegy for the utopian promise of post-Stonewall gay identity, then coming to its end with the onset of the AIDs crisis—Delany also helped open the door for a new diversity in the producers and consumers of the genre.27 This moment also witnessed a dramatic renewal and expansion of sci

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planet. It is here that the ques- tion of the Left has to be raised again, if we are to maintain a minimum de- gree of social justice.19 After all, the West always takes great care to maintain its own self-sufficiency in food, and that includes literature, through financial support for its terroir.20 That much we know. On this score, the argument I make in my book is far-reaching and in- structive. The focus is on the confrontation between the arrogant ‘white’ Eu- ropean and the stigmatized African, Asian, Caribbean, and Native American Other, a looking-glass in

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- guages between colonizer and colonized, between and among European, Native American, and African persons – but the scene of encounter highlights the extent to which translation is always shot through with operations of power and violence. Translation, at this original moment, involves the creation of shared meaning but it simul- taneously generates silence and erasure in its wake. And what of these erasures, these silences? How do they linger, or remain as foundation- al in the creole culture that is American? Embodied Remains The word lagniappe, used today

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“complex and changeable relationships between Christians and Muslims imagined in the Turkish plays,” the author concludes that, “in certain instances Christians and Muslims live together amicably; at other times they engage in combat. Almost invariably, however, the two experience desire for each other. Between 1588 and 1624 at least a dozen English plays dramatized Christian-Muslim desire. Christian men and women long for Muslim lovers, Muslim men and women desire Christians, and these passions drive the action of most of the plays. This is not to say that these