Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 247 items for :

  • All: Trust and Virtual Worlds. contemporary Perspectives x
  • English Literature and Culture x
Clear All
Restricted access

Series:

Mumford, too, spoke of the dwarfing of the human future when ‘automism and compulsion become pervasive’ and the mobiliza- tion of ‘stupor’ towards greater stupefaction in terms of the marketed virtual worlds of the sportsman, the celebrity and the leader. Glorifying the sub-human, Mumford argued, fed the need for a collective revenge and a collective victim. The glorification of war, contempt for the physically weak, disdain for scientific inquiry (and one may add the life of the mind in general), a hatred of democracy and of civilization itself grounded on a

Restricted access

Series:

the pear- shaped head’ (MD 7) – not to bring the perspective of the world ‘beyond the bridge.’”127 The reader is invited to reject the ‘objective scientific methods of understanding represented here by Reema’s boy – and later in the story, by George – and to identify ourselves instead with the ways of understanding used by the inhabitants of Willow Springs. We must learn to ‘really lis- ten,’ not only by paying attention to the small details and nuances of meaning but also by submitting ourselves willingly to the rituals and traditions that constitute the

Restricted access

associated with the landed interest and its political ideology, but ruined himself by speculation when the South Sea Company went bankrupt in 1720, is indicative of the Tories’ growing difficulties in adapting to a steadily expanding capitalist society. In the Beggar’s Opera, he draws a picture of contemporary life in which everything is for sale, imagining a world where no moral point of reference remains.18 In the midst of the breakdown of bourgeois morals, the gentleman-robber and aristocrat of the underworld, Macheath, who shows at least some generosity coupled

Restricted access

Series:

read it first as a great product of the creative im- agination, and then to show it as part of the relationship between the virtual (or near-real) of the West and the bustling consciousness of the Third World. While Section II of the chapter centres on the game of soccer, Section III reflects on Zidane and Section IV on Derrida. The aim is not to engage with Beur literature, but to reflect on a cultural icon and a philosopher–critic who made a terrific entry into a provincial society. II This investigation I shall conduct without dwelling on Zidane’s self

Restricted access

Series:

(Hyland 2001). Typical features of stance marking are hedges, boosters, attitude markers and self-mention, while engagement marking involves second person pronouns, shared knowledge, directives and questions. Works on evaluation and stance are relatively new and often concentrate on contemporary mass audience texts, such as journalism, politics, and media dis- course, or more recently academic genres. Nothing has, to my knowledge, been done with such genres as recipes and charms, and for quite obvious reasons, because they presuppose a complete trust on the part

Restricted access

SECTION 4 – Literary and Stylistic Aspects MIGUEL MARTÍNEZ LÓPEZ Ex nihilo nihil fit: Dystopian Satire in Poe’s “Mellonta Tauta” The present paper explores E.A. Poe’s biography and literary work from the per- spective of utopianism. He is seen as an anti-utopian writer who believed that the modern world and the modern man carried the seeds of self-destruction. Works such as “Mellonta Tauta” or Eureka!, dated 1848, the year of his at- tempted suicide, can be successfully approached from the perspective of the es- sential unhappiness of Poe

Restricted access

Series:

(Krakauer 2007, 134). Life thrums at a higher pitch and the world is made real. He experiences such a violent fascination with terror that he has to resist the siren song of the void. He feels abandoned, vulnerable, lost (141). In isolation, his emotions are amplified (138). Eventually, he learns to believe in the reliability of his hands and feet and head. He learns to trust his self-control (142). In high-risk enterprises, like Kra- kauer’s, or McCandless’s, a superior faculty of attention sets in. Kra- kauer calls it a trance-like state, which turns the climb

Restricted access

Series:

moral statements” (Hunt 46). And in accordance with a cognitive reading of the play it seems obvious that we cannot trust our impressions or our minds, but we have to question the apparent world- reality truths over and over again. While The Waters of Babylon might appear to be playing games with reality in a satiric way, there can be no doubt that Arden’s and later also D’Arcy’s plays draw on a historic reality of incidents, which actually happened, although their interpretation of that reality used to be different from the “official views”. Introduc- ing

Restricted access

Series:

– indeed, it was totally destroyed. He thus speaks from the perspective of one who has come back from the dead, and this huge time gap explains his ignorance regarding the location of the church and other details, making the story blurry and diaphanous. In the diegesis the sculp- tor Walter has a sister Margaret, also a sculptress, who awaits the return of a brave, handsome knight, Amyot, from the Crusades. In fact, the latter 17 The only story with a contemporary setting (although one is barely aware of this due to the mannerist medieval trappings), is ‘Frank

Restricted access

Series:

the world. If Mumford was to lament the rejection of theology, metaphysics and philosophy, Macdonald, thinking against himself, tried to fill the gap with some of his immediate contemporaries in psychology, anthropology and social analysis. While he himself disputed the usefulness of any scientific model in ethics, he noted that there were at least two 128 Part 2 kinds of science (that today are called ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ science) and that soft sci- ence might have some answers. In the second part of his article he drew a line from the French encyclopédistes