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effect is to create a virtual conversation among a diverse community of stakeholders. By showing the same set of videotapes to parents and practitioners in multiple sites in each of the five nations in this study we were able to produce data that allows us to uncover similarities and differences in how each nation approaches the promises and challenges of bringing migrants into the fabric of society and differences and similarities in the perspec- tives of parents (both immigrant and non-immigrant) and practitioners. The steps of the method (1) The research team

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likely, the ‘southern-oriented’ regional perspective of the mapmaker and scholars involved in reproducing the categories of Canadian regionalism. By the late 20th century, the urban- industrial heartland, Central Canada, came to dominate the Canadian regional landscape, as a virtual ‘Main Street’ developed between Québec City and Windsor Ontario. Meanwhile, the surrounding regions became the “hinterland” of the central Ontario growth engine, itself strongly linked to US markets and economic growth (McCann and Gunn, 1997). All this, Paul Philips suggests in his

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strictly distinguished from shadow. I will repeatedly in- 1 Oxford English Dictionary. 20 Harold Schweizer voke that difference only because shade is so distinctly different but its distinct- ness is stubbornly elusive. II The elusiveness of this difference between shadow and shade can be tested by assigning either of these two words certain adjectival modifiers, like cool, dark, quiet, serene. My contention is that the less such a quality partakes of the world of material, physical reality, the more it seems to become descriptive of the prop- erties of shade

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The Arts Embodied The Glass Veil An Installation at the Medizinhistorisches Museum der Charité by Suzanne Anker in conjunction with Habitus in Habitat. INTERVIEW: SUZANNE ANKER AND SABINE FLACH I Enshrouded in glass, and once again in glass vitrines, specimens for a scientist are stark reminders of life’s material code. Suspended in time and put on display, the corporeal flesh becomes a relic of its own history. In a nether world reminis- cent of sleep, yet without the degradation of time, the specimen floats in a pathos of insufficient sustenance

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the characters since the ensemble of tales retold by Pasolini lays bare an inner truth about humanity in general—a Marxist truth admixed with, or attenuated by, the providential perspective of romance. Indeed, it is the beauty of human love and sexuality in a grimy and fearful world to which Pasolini pays tribute against the backdrop of some breath- taking natural settings;29 the film celebrates in this respect a rite of passage from childhood to adolescence and sexual–amorous maturity.)30 Fiore delle mille e una notte interpolates within the tale of Zumurrud

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the metaphor for another kind. The metaphorical power of ‘as if,’ the power to imagine one thing as another, makes the human world a virtual one. Our own contemporaries are very aware of the virtual aspect of the imagination because of the spread of dig- ital technologies. The impact of these is assayed by Michael Peters. The book is transformed into the electronic reader, community migrates online with LiveJournal and Facebook, currency notes turn into electronic credit trans- actions, and physical mail is replaced by electronic mail. Images become words, and words

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to explore sexuality in the pre-World War II era, I will argue that it is the recurring and often conflicting tropes of heterosexual desire that make these films a useful window into historical perspectives on girlhood, dating, and sexuality in the period. The 1930s and early 1940s offered competing discourses of adolescent sexuality. Teens in the period increasingly began to carve out cul- tural space and to create new public conventions and practices around dating. The parent culture, however, continued to articulate outdated codes of sexual behavior and

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/H. Ellonen (2008), ‘Online satisfaction, trust and loyalty, and the impact of the offline parent brand’, Journal of Product & Brand Management, Vol. 17, No. 6, pp. 403-413 Kaplan, A.M./M. Haenlein (2009), ‘The fairyland of Second Life: Virtual social worlds and how to use them’, Business Horizons, No. 52, pp. 563-572 Keller, K. L. (1993), ‘Conceptualizing, Measuring, and Managing Customer-Based Brand Equity’, Journal of Marketing, Vol. 57, pp. 1-22 Keller, K.L./D.A. Aaker (1992), ‘The Effects of Sequential Introduction of Brand Extensions’, Journal of Marketing

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Schools in Japan and the World. Kyoto, Japan: Minerva Publishing. Cowie, H. (2006). Young people themselves tackle the problem of school vi- olence. In K. Österman & K. Björkqvist (Eds.), Contemporary research on ag- gression. Proceedings of the XVI World Meeting of the International Society for Research on Aggression, Santorini, Greece, 2004 (pp. 108-114). Vasa, Fin- land: Åbo Akademi University. Cowie, H., & Jennifer, D. (2007). Managing violence in schools: A whole- school approach to best practice. London, UK: Sage. Cowie, H., & Smith, P. K. (in press). Peer

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the Case of Ritual Child Abuse’. Sociological Perspectives 3. CHAPTER TWO Skinheads as Defenders of Russia? Power versus Friendship in Xenophobic Youth Subcultures Elena Omel’chenko and Al’bina Garifzianova Introduction This chapter considers friendship and trust in a group of skinheads in a northern Russian city. It explores how these concepts are understood within the group, the norms and sanctions which underpin them and the practices through which they are enacted. This approach differs from existing academic literature on aggressive youth groups in Russia