Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 2,181 items for :

  • All: hollywood raises x
Clear All
Restricted access

Series:

history with specific episodes from Italian history. Indeed, adopting this approach can provide scholars with an additional interpretive tool that in turn enables original readings of the films to be made. This chapter will thus use comparative analysis to detail and contrast the sectional antagonisms and the differing representations of North and South that are found in Andrew V. McLaglen’s Hollywood Western The Undefeated (1969) and Leon Klimovsky’s Italian Western Raise Your Hands, Dead Man, You’re Under Arrest (1971). Both films feature prologues that are set on

Restricted access

Gainsborough Pictures Reframed

Or: Raising Jane Austen for 1990s Film- A Film-Historic and Film-Analytical Study of the 1995 Films "Sense and Sensibility and "Persuasion

Martina Anzinger

In the 1990s U.S. and British adaptations of Jane Austen novels enjoyed unprecedented popularity. To find out why, one has to revise and go beyond what has dominated in the discussion of these films: the «fidelity-to-the-novel»-discourse and the «influence-of-national-cinema»-discourse. Thus, in this book film theory, film history, various kinds of film analysis (structural, feminist, Marxist) and literary analysis are combined. From these angles, the 1990s and previous Austen films are studied and compared, two of them in detail: the 1995 «U.S.» feature film Sense and Sensibility and the 1995 «British» telefilm Persuasion. This analysis shows: the 1990s Austen films, though reflecting certain features of British and Hollywood cinema and not greatly deviating from the novels, are independent works of art; also, they are products of their time, displaying, for instance, a liberal feminist attitude and criticism of class distinctions.
Restricted access

Series:

, geographical, filmic—that I take and trace in what follows. The playful substitution of ‘stomach’ for ‘heart’ suggests both optimism and despair. Optimism, because it implies that swapping hearts is not the issue: it is impossible and therefore not even worth attempting. No matter the reasons for exile, one can never truly change hearts and leave behind the homeland, where one was raised. It may be impossible too, but somehow the idea of swapping stomachs sounds like something that one might almost achieve. And despair, because it hints that because of the simple

Restricted access

The Spike Lee Enigma ← x | 1 → ·1· INTRODUCTION “Pictures are for entertainment, messages should be delivered by Western Union” (attributed to Samuel Goldwyn, in Augarde, 1991, p. 91). This disparaging remark about the role of Hollywood films in conveying social and political messages is often erroneously attributed to the influential film producer, Samuel Goldwyn (see Marx, 1976). Goldwyn, in truth, was astute enough to recognize that movies have significance that extends far beyond entertainment. The medium of film is fraught with ethical implications because

Restricted access

Crash Politics and Antiracism

Interrogations of Liberal Race Discourse

Phillip Howard and George J. Sefa Dei

Crash Politics and Antiracism argues that race and racism continue to script the social fabric in Euro-North America. While dominant discourses claim that we have made significant progress away from racial bigotry, there is no shortage of evidence that inequitable ideologies of race prevail. Similarly, mainstream cinematic productions have mass appeal, yet tend to demonstrate and cement the racial ideologies that circulate in society. As such, they can be used either for the propagation of dominant ideologies or in the development of critical consciousness. Crash Politics and Antiracism does the latter, understanding the award-winning film Crash as an especially interesting pedagogical site, for while to many it offers a fresh analysis of race and racism, the antiracist analyses in this book suggest that it recycles oppressive understandings of race. The essays in this collection, written from a variety of racial locations, provide readings of Crash that seek to disrupt the movie’s subtle messages and, more importantly, some of the intractable liberal notions of race that perpetuate racial inequity. The considerations raised in this volume will enrich critical conversations about how race and racism work in contemporary Euro-North American societies – whether these conversations occur in classrooms, boardrooms, or living rooms.
Restricted access

Series:

he and two university friends started as a moonlight- ing venture.41 Here, Macdonald expressed his independence and honed his criti- cal faculties away from the omnipresent gaze of Luce’s chief editors in four es- says on T. S. Eliot, Robinson Jeffers, and American and Soviet cinema. A fifth on Hollywood directors, written for the arts journal Symposium, caps off Mac- donald’s early period. Taken jointly, the articles provide a window into the emergence of themes that would reverberate through Macdonald’s writings on culture in the succeeding decades. Macdonald

Restricted access

Series:

decision is probably because the narratives of biopics mirror those of non-biographical movies featuring teachers. However, when viewed as more than just part of the “Hollywood curriculum” (Dalton, 2010), and instead as a larger part of educational discourse, analyses of biopics can reveal the intersections of educational policy, teachers’ motives, representations of students, and cinematic structures. Given the potential for these intersections, how should educators approach this genre in their courses? What happens when audiences learn that these stories are based on

Restricted access

Series:

126 Visual Difference It is difficult to reconcile Amelia, Mira Nair’s pedestrian 2009 biopic of famed aviatrix Amelia Earhart, with her extensive filmography documenting the lives, loves, and losses of the Indian diaspora. A conventional Hollywood produc- tion, Amelia harkens back to an American cinematic history at odds with the “accented” or exilic cinema in which Nair usually participates. Yet it is not her only film made in close proximity to mainstream Hollywood. As Jigna Desai notes, Mississippi Masala, Nair’s 1991 breakout hit, may have been

Restricted access

from the Hollywood entertainment citadel. Part Four: Alembication “They cite the Australian or Cuban cinema to point out the absence of ambition in our filmmakers…but they are the first to raise their fists when one of their own emerges with a new form” (Michael Cimino in Positif, 1980) Talking in 1966 at the Drew Theological Seminary, Madison in New Jersey, Kenneth Burke rounded up thoughts on rhetoric and communication as they had developed since the 1930s. One central motif was that of the scapegoat and how ← 151 | 152 → If action, then drama. If drama

Restricted access

. Owing to their sufferings, struggles and hardships, both Stahr and the Fonsteins are ennobled by the two narrators. Here also lies a very prominent similarity between the two novels. Both novelists employ first-person narrators, who function as ambivalent audiences of the “performances,” and the rhetoric, of the characters. Because she is a member of the Hollywood community, the social and moral world she has been raised to admire, Cecilia, Fitzgerald’s narrator, is initially fascinated by their conduct and behavior. On the other hand, Bellow’s unnamed narrator starts