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Perspectives on Asian American and Asian Diasporic Women Writers (Munster: Lit Verlag, 2004), 11–25. Słownik Języka Polskiego, ed. Władysław Szymczak (Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Nau- kowe PWN, 1995). Spivak, Gayatri. ‘Can the Subaltern Speak?’ in Patrick Williams and Laura Chrisman, eds, Colonial Discourse and Postcolonial Theory: A Reader (New York: Columbia University Press, 1994), 66–111. Stein, Mark, Black British Literature: Novels of Transformation (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2004). , ‘Posed Ethnicity and the Postethnic: Hanif Kureishi’s Novels’ in Heinz

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- presentation as a multicultural polity” (Brown 2013, 20), although there had already been many migration flows41 from the West Indies to Britain even before the Second World War. Meanwhile, it should not be glossed over that ‘black’ here is actually not a biological or racial signifier but a political category including African, Asian and different ethnicities such as Indo- Caribbean, Bangladeshi, gay, women, Muslim and so on (Procter 2000, 5–6). Kobane Mercer in Welcome to the Jungle similarly articulates the concept of ‘blackness’ within this particular context: When

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ABSTRACT. This essay scrutinizes and compares/contrasts the narratives by Jhumpa Lahiri and Kiran Desai, more precisely The Namesake and The Inheritance of Loss, both based on the experience of Indian migrants to New York City. Both writers be- long to the youngest generation of the so-called Indian diaspora in the US and in spite of their different cultural backgrounds and personal biographies, their fictional stories of migration, uprootedness and re-territorialization allow for a re-con- sideration of American literature in its relationship to the new global novel

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miners for the nearby colliery. 34 Chapter Two put it in an article published on line as part of the Project called “Crossing Borders. New Writing from Africa”.2 At that time, McCabe read books by Byron, Shelley, Shakespeare, Upton Sinclair, Robert Tressal, Robert Burns, John Steinbeck, Edgar Allan Poe, and other canonical writers that were at home (Anon., 2005). Then, as a teenager, and very concerned about how to best spend the pay for his Saturday job in halfords, he discovered the Penguin Modern Poets Series, “getting three poets in one book”, and read “a

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Troubles The participation of women in political movements that are characterized in part by their violent actions raises fundamental questions in the field of gender studies and social sciences. Their presence in hard-line, often left- wing political movements in Northern Ireland, France, South America or Palestine has raised academic interest in the study of gender and deviance.1 The sexual division of labour and social spaces on the one hand, and the stereotypical binary characteristics attributed to the masculine and the feminine on the other, are among the

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Metaphysik. Ed. Rudolf Malter. Stuttgart: Philipp Reclam Jun., 1976. Print. 314 Kober, Daniela. "'Sie Müssen Meine Neue Englische Sprache Studieren.' Bettina Von Armins Goethe’s Briefwechsel Mit Einem Kinde." Grenzgängerin- nen: Zur Geschlechterdifferenz in der Übersetzung. Eds. Nadja Grbic and Michaela Wolf. 4 Vol. Graz: Institut für Translationswissenschaft, 2002. 47-65. Print. Kolodny, Annette. "Inventing a Feminist Discourse: Rhetoric and Resistance in Margaret Fuller’s Woman in the Nineteenth Century." Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers. Ed. Karen L

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strangely recalls the world of the trenches, with the obvious difference that it is “women only.” The peace protesters live in a field of mud, “deep brown, ankle- clutching gluey carpet of the stuff,” turned into a network of “quagmire paths” and “duckboards”; they go on night patrols, crawling on the no man’s land that separates the camp from the American airbase, and attempt to cut the barbed wire and break into the enemy’s position (M 35-36). Their regular confrontations with the police and the army might be seen as so many battles in an allegedly non

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travel books should be recalled, in which they are treated as a “sub-species of a memoir” and their literal validity is attempted through “constant 45 On the issue of “genre contract”, see: for example, Gérard Genette, Paratexts, pp. 41-42. It should be added that it was not only Todorov and Genette, who treated genres from the perspective of social contracts. For example, Frederic Jameson, an American post-Marxist critic noted: “genres are essentially literary institutions, or social contracts between a writer

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Yet, McCourt himself appropriates jazz forms to connect Irish and African-American cultures to challenge racial stereotypes and promote social integration. By incorporating a music that performs an ideological role in the face of oppressive social and political constraints, he is foregrounding how black musicians struggled against the prejudice of the dominant culture. In its drive for self-expression, jazz challenges social and cultural hierarchies and subverts notions of racial difference, having a positive effect on the social standing of African-Americans

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discuss some of the leading rebellion narratives of 1950s American culture. Portraits of Angered Youths: Rebellion Literature Criticism of 1950s literature tends to group the wide galaxy of writers falling under the “beat generation” umbrella as prime examples of the decade’s rebellion narratives. Typically associated with the beats in re- cent interpretations are other writers of the period who cast themselves, or their characters, as outsiders of sorts – books like J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (1951), which David Castronovo ranks on a par with Jack