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, to Kafka’s novels and Rilke’s sonnets. Often he went to the movies during his spare hours in strange towns, even when he knew that his schedule would make it possible to see only part of a film. He was critical of most of the new films coming from Hollywood. “ Another half hour in one of these idiotic films ,” he noted in his diary, adding, “ People are being corrupted by this FILTH almost as much as by fascism …” [14 Oct.]. Still, Klaus was now able to write to his European friends that, “ Things are going well, I am quite happy to be here .” 9 He spent the month

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the clerical negligence, and on February 7 th , 2013, the 13 th Amendment was finally ratified on the whole territory of the United States. This civic action, inspired by a Hollywood movie, ended, at least in official documents, the problem of slavery, but to this day slavery’s heritage influences the position of African-Americans within the framework of values dominated by the mainstream culture of Whites and mutual relations between the two races. “The ‘masterculture,’ like the master of the plantations who sought to rule the lives of slaves, tries to impose

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Vincendeau wrote, “aesthetically these films were ‘terrible’, and financially they turned out to be a disaster” (1999: 208). The few surviving MLVFs are scattered in various archives and locations, and accessing them is difficult. An additional reason is that their existence was overshadowed “by the sound patents struggles” (Vincendeau 1999: 207) between Hollywood and the European film companies for market space in the 1930s. In this paper, I examine MLVFs as artistic outcomes of contradictory factors. On the one hand, they were “part of a complete system of world film

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New Readings in American Drama

Something's Happening Here

Norma Jenckes

New Readings in American Drama, an anthology of some of the best essays that have been published in the scholarly journal, American Drama, showcases the latest research and applies the newest theoretical approaches to the huge body of writing for the American stage, screen, and television. Rounding-up all the usual canonical subjects from O’Neill to Miller to Mamet, this book also highlights marginalized writers from earlier decades of the twentieth century and stresses the work of women and African-American playwrights. Although many people sheepishly confess that they rarely read poetry or fiction once they leave school, most must admit that they are daily viewers of drama, a ubiquitous experience that people enjoy on television, videos, and at the movies. This popular ascendancy of drama bolsters the argument for using the classroom to raise the level of discussion of what students are actually going to watch for the rest of their lives – and this book provides the tools to facilitate that conversation.
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classes to them with the hope of training teach- ers who would stay on the reservation. This is a significant detail of the story. I saw several people I knew in the class, so as the students were filing into the cafeteria in preparation, I spoke with a few and then went to the front of the room to begin class. Before I could utter a word, though, one woman raised her hand. It was Jean. She and one of her daughters had been in a creative writing course I had taught the previous year on the reservation. She had a question: “What’s a white guy (although she used the

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-scale industrial film making associated with Hollywood, but also on cer- tain developments happening outside that industry. In this context, the ultimate question is how these changes in film-making practices are affecting the experi- ence of theatrical motion picture customs. Studies have revealed that the pri- mary viewers of Hollywood movies are young males. Other research indicates that rapid editing is considered to imply masculinity at least when it is con- trasted with slower editing transitions in movies. Furthermore, younger men are assumed to prefer action

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The Problematic Tyler Perry | 33 → CHAPTER TWO The Political Economy OF Tyler Perry Replicating Industry Ideals and Exploiting the Commodity Audience LEAH P. HUNTER AND JENNIFER M. PROFFITT Between 2010 and 2011, Tyler Perry earned $130 million, making him the highest paid man in the entertainment industry, topping Hollywood statesmen and heavyweights such as producer Jerry Bruckheimer, ranked second with $113 million, and director Steven Spielberg, ranked third with $107 million (Pomerantz, 2011). Over the course of two years, Perry was certainly prolific

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– graphic novel and comic book fans who now number more than 100,000. This high attendance has transformed ← 161 | 162 → the July event into a kind of mandatory stop for studios when promoting science fiction- and fantasy-themed blockbusters. Walt Disney Pictures thus hoped to raise interest for Narnia 1 among the 2005 edition’s participants, some of them having already contributed to the success of The Lord of the Rings trilogy. The internet being part and parcel of Hollywood’s advertising arsenal since the mid-1990s, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe got its

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. In several cases, these students literally blow up their schools when the issues they raise are not substantively addressed. We have talked about films where there is some evidence of student resistance, but by and large, Hollywood films repeatedly present codes that constitute schools as sites of limited resistance staged by students and, sometimes, by a progressive teacher or two. As I have written in “The Hollywood View: Protecting the Status Quo in Schools Onscreen,” schools are constructed as spaces where the disconnect between what matters to students and

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, 2015, p. 52). Green-lighting When enough money has been raised to cover the cost of production, the independent film can go into production, i.e., the filmmakers give themselves the green light, usually with no firm U.S. distribution deal. An exception to this might be when the specialty arm of a distributor, such as Sony Classics, makes a distribution offer pending completion of production and post-production, as a way to avoid the production falling under costly Hollywood union contracts. When a film goes into production, smart producers will allocate money for a