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victory is only ultimate when the victorious party eats the enemy or a part of his body. In addition to the symbolic and literal triumph over the defeated party, the barbarian is acquiring his strength and power. ← 166 | 167 → Historians have also been sparing of words, maybe not as brief and laconic as philosophers but cannibalism has failed to become a main subject for them. In the monumental work of Jacques Le Goff on medieval Europe 3 , the chapter on hunger is not very extensive. It is a fragment of a larger whole dedicated to agricultural production. Le Goff

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Testaments, Donations, and the Values of Books as Gifts ← 206 | 207 → 6. Conclusion The aim of this study was to discover what can be learned from documents and records of medieval book gifts about the values associated with books. Using the theory that semantic fields are useful in categorising the data and can serve as indicators for the values associated with books as gifts, the analysis has shown that a variety of aspects of the book can provide details on these values. In the course of this study, we have looked at a variety of sources about medieval

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109 5. Imagery of necessite in Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde and The Knight’s Tale In the monograph, we explore the issue of how linguistic and visual resources serve the function of complementary memory carriers. We have proposed that language and visual culture allow the mediation of the community’s cumulative knowledge, and a prominent role in the process has been ascribed to the image, whether linguistic or material. In this way, Chaucer’s TRC and KT come to be regarded as imaginaria of the late medieval mind, for the poet’s imagery can be argued

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Chapter 5 5. Imagery of necessite in Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde and The Knight’s Tale In the monograph, we explore the issue of how linguistic and visual resources serve the function of complementary memory carriers. We have proposed that language and visual culture allow the mediation of the community’s cumulative knowledge, and a prominent role in the process has been ascribed to the image, whether linguistic or material. In this way, Chaucer’s TRC and KT come to be regarded as imaginaria of the late medieval mind, for the poet’s imagery can be argued

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statement would demonstrate a renovation of the roof and an enlargement of the church during the years of the ministry of this prelate from Ampurias 3 . This might also be the context of the arrival of a wooden group – the Deposition from the Cross – datable to the early thirteenth century and belonging to the building’s Medieval furnishings 4 , currently kept at the town’s parish house of San Sebastiano. Beyond certain items that are presumably original but not yet properly datable, the status of unicum of the epigraphic bean in Sardinia’s Medieval landscape bears

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þe Book bereþ witnesse to burnes that kan rede: Quod scimus loquimur, quod vidimus testamur . Of quod scimus comeþ clergie, a konnynge of heuene, And of quod vidimus comeþ kynde wit, of siȝte of diuerse peple. Langland reveals imagination acting as the crucial synapse between sense data and intellection, Kynde Wit and Clergie, which he calls ‘neiȝe cosynes boþe’, and which through his intervention need to co-operate rather than be in competition with each other (B XII.93 and 95–6): For boþe [as mirours ben] to amenden oure defautes, And lederes for lewed men

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China-central world as China struggled to regain its sovereignty. This chapter focuses on the introduction of general ideas of sovereignty and the non-intervention principle for the purpose of elaborating upon China’s evolving understanding of sovereignty. Section 1. The Westphalian Sovereignty Westphalia has achieved hallmark recognition for the inauguration of the interstate system in modern academic discourse even though some questioned its historical benchmark because of the absence of the word “sovereignty” in the peace treaties. 2 However, it did not

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dialogue form, as well as dialogic sequences of lyrics, are examined, leading to conclusions about the nature, functions, and metacommunicational significance of short devotional dialogues in medieval culture. Lyrics in dialogue form From the Anglo-Saxon Advent lyrics to the end of the medieval period there was a vogue in English poetry for rendering religious topics in dialogue form. Such a direct exchange of words between concrete, personal interlocutors was often embedded in a narrative frame, as in Als i lay vp-on a nith, titled by Brown the Dialogue

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Part One Technologies of the Medieval Book: The Manuscript Matrix 1What Is a Manuscript Culture? on a recent June morning, I turned to the science section of the New York Times and was intrigued to read the following headline: “Medicine’s Hidden Roots in an Ancient Manuscript.” Under the banner, but before the text of the article, I saw a large photograph of the open manuscript showing dark lines of text set off by red initials and interspersed with rubrics (section headings in red). The opening lines hint at a mystery: “The first time Grigory Kessel held

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Eamon Maher and Grace Neville

France – Ireland: Anatomy of a Relationship, with a Preface by Professor Joe Lee, is a selection of essays that seeks to explore the many links (spiritual, literary, cultural and historical) that exist between these two Gallic cousins. Figures dealt with in the book include John McGahern, Kate O’Brien, Oscar Wilde, John Broderick, George Moore, Maria Edgeworth, Daniel O’Connell, Wolfe Tone on the Irish side and Barthes, Derrida, Balzac, Flaubert, Julien Green, François Mauriac, Jean Sulivan, Paul Féval, Lamennais, Jean-Pierre Droz, Montalembert, Germaine de Staël among the French. Irish involvement in philosophical debates in France and their military exploits on French soil are also discussed. There is something in these essays for anyone with even a passing interest in Irish or French history, politics and literature.