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Susans Teaching Black Women’s Literature”. EAST 1/1987, 109–119. ← 61 | 62 → ——. “Between Aversion, Alibi and Acknowledgement: White Feminism and Black Women’s Literature in Germany” Trivia – A Journal of Ideas 14/1989, 52–58. ——. “Frauen afrikanischer Herkunft: Feministische Kultur und Ethnizität in Amerika und Europa. “Beiträge zur feministischen Theorie und Praxis , 27, 25–44. ——. The African Continuum and African-American Women Writers. Their Literary Presence and Ancestral Past . Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1995. ——. Empowering Encounters with Audre

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incorporation of diverse religious ideologies. Specifically, Hill cleverly makes use of other intertextual allusions along with an array of Black linguistic varieties, devices and systems to engage in the historic Black art of storytelling through the contemporary medium of a rap battle (verbal dueling) while indexing the underlying moral and spiritual prism. To achieve this, Hill traverses the continuum of Black oral traditions from what has been referred to as African American Language (AAL) to Jamaican Creole or “Patwa,” variably and strategically employing well

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the Black Aesthetic, and a comparison of the two women in terms of black female career trajectories further highlights the significant status of Brooks in the larger canon. 6 Zora Neale Hurston’s Seraph on the Suwanee can be read by many black nationalists as a ‘white’ novel that tackled no racial themes since it was published in 1948 when many African American writers were seeking integration through shunning such themes. Margaret Walker’s early poetry in the Chicago Renaissance was also not feminist

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Sources Adamson, L. B., Foster, M. A., Roark, M. L., & Reed, D. B. (1998). Doing a science project: Gender differences during childhood. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 35(8), 845–857. Adenika-Marrow, T. J. (1996). A lifeline to science careers for African American females. Edu- cational Leadership, 53(8), 80–83. Adigwe, J. C. (1992). Gender differences in chemical problem solving amongst Nigerian stu- dents. Research in Science and Technology Education, 10(2), 187–201. Allen, E. J. (2003). Constructing women’s status: Policy discourses of the

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, Maurice R, Negroes in American Society. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1949. Davis, Angela. Women, Race, and Class. New York: Vintage Books, 1983. Davis, Angela. Women, Culture, and Politics. New York: Random House, 1984. Davis, Arthur P. “The Tragic Mulatto Theme in Six Works of Langston Hughes.” Phylon 16 (1955): 195–204. 206 | The Tragic Black Buck Davis, Arthur P. From the Dark Tower: Afro-American Writers 1900 to 1960. Washington, DC: Howard University Press, 1974. Davis, F. James. Who Is Black?: One Nation’s Definition. University Park: Pennsylvania State University

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Narrating the New Nation chapter six The Global North and South: Comparative Postcolonial Poetics in Diasporic South Asian Women’s Texts Jaspal Kaur Singh This chapter examines the poetics of resistance to gendered identity formations in Diasporic South Asian Women’s texts and their interconnections to the Indian and South African nation-states. I argue that in their re-envisioning of Indianness and Indian womanhood, certain writers are themselves limited due to their location and class politics. I examine texts from the Global North

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biased traditions and thus offer appreciated civilizational propensities. 9 Intellectual writings of the nineteenth and artistry of the twentieth century brood over an incessant participant via an interchangeable time-­continuum. Intellectual reconstructions have been categorized principally as writers employing antiquity and including an ancient African Egyptian and/or logically in later dating particularly with an Atlantic-­world sphere with West African inclusion and positioning. 10 Moreover, the ancestral civilizational idea inextricably has ties to the

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power with few restrictions, a trend that perhaps influenced emerging leaders once they were in power themselves. The persistence of deeply entrenched practices that emphasise the power imbalance between women and men seems to highlight that there are still deep power divisions in many African tribal cultures, divisions that seem relatively unaffected by colonialism. The high prevalence of child marriages—for example, 46% of girls below the age of 18 years are married in SSA compared with 21% in Latin America and the Caribbean (The Elders, 2012)—and initiation

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every person worthy of note within the field. Nevertheless, we wanted these to be representative. Our selection process was: First, we included African American composers, singers, musicians choosing from all historical periods, and from among both men and women. Second, we included as many as possible of the “firsts” in African American Music. Likewise, we made sure to profile African American composers, singers, musicians who are particularly well known inside academia and in our communities. Finally, each entry provides a brief description of the person’s most

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: McGraw-Hill, 1949. Davis, Angela. Women, Race, and Class . New York: Vintage Books, 1983. Davis, Angela. Women, Culture, and Politics . New York: Random House, 1984. Davis, Arthur P. “The Tragic Mulatto Theme in Six Works of Langston Hughes.” Phylon 16 (1955): 195–204. ←205 |  206→ Davis, Arthur P. From the Dark Tower: Afro-American Writers 1900 to 1960 . Washington, DC: Howard University Press, 1974. Davis, F. James. Who Is Black?: One Nation’s Definition . University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1991. Davis, T., and Henry Louis Gates