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adequate that responds to the constantly changing environment (objective reality) as readily as possible^ This article appeared in English in: Asian and African Studies, 21, 1985, pp. 79-88. 60 while one hundred per cent consistency seems to be linked to absolute stability of language. From this point of view, however, any natural language is to be qualified as a sort of a compromise vocabulary is treated as obeying the requirement of reflexive adequacy, while grammar is governed by the principle of consisten cy. An analogous idea has been expressed by J. H

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. Also, footnotes have been updated where an original "in press" could now be replaced by a more specific reference. It is gratifying to all his friends that this selection of Deem Worth's writings appears at a time when he is celebrating his fiftieth birthday and in the middle of an exceptionally dynamic and successful career in teaching, re- search, and service to the profession — the three areas in which an American university professor is supposed to perform. Obviously, however, only one facet of his many activities, his scholarship, can be presented here

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reason whether women's emancipation was so splendidly served by 68 (and also whether sexual liberation had its origins there, exclusively so, or in some much more profound, underlying evolutionary process). Most importantly however, the etatist authori- ties were already in the medium-term supplementally legitimized and thus pro- vided with even more effectiveness. This, to be sure, should be a rather depress- ing thought for the "revolutionaries" of 68. Then again, many among them quickly became part of the establishment. 63 Let there be no misunderstanding

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the writer? In M� Baker� G� Francis and E� Tognini-Bonelli, eds� 1993. Text and technology� Amsterdam/ Philadel- phia: John Benjamins� Malmkmjœr, K�, 2003� On pseudo-subversive use of corpora in translator train- ing� In Zanettin, F�, S� Bernardini and D� Stewart, eds� 2003� Corpora in transla- tor education. Manchester: St Jerome, 119–144� Navarro, F� A�, 2014� Diccionario de dudas y dificultades de traducción del inglés medico, 3rd edition� Madrid: Cosnautas� Available at http://www�cosnautas�com� Partington, A�, 1998� Patterns and meanings� Amsterdam

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inflections in Slov: (2) The tortoise outruns the hare - Želva prehiti zajca. /Zajca prehiti Zetva. The hare outruns the tortoise - Zajec prehiti lelvo. /2ehro prehiti zajec. There inflections fa il to indicate it. a sentence in isolation is assumed to have SVO order, as in }ene so pogosLile tekao vãJÈe (The wives entertained the women c o m p e ti to r s ) . Э in other cases, the meaning and/or the context provides sufficient indication: (3) Dober okus daje sol. (OVS in Slov) It is (the) salt that gives a good flavour. (4) Ce skuonost zavazi gAffPA^irflvo• to

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this process in his own mother, who ceased to be a Catalan speaker at the age of 6 (in 1949), when she joined a religious boarding school in Perpignan where “[l]es monges li van ensenyar el llatí, l’anglès, el castellà i li van fer oblidar la seua llengua” (PB 26). This oblivion was part of what the writer has known to be “la mort d’una Frederic Barberà 338 llengua. Un assassinat programat amb milers d’assassins i còmplices” (PB 9). And yet for Bezsonoff a whole community cannot be blamed for interrupting the transmission of their language and speaking the

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African American families and how it is affected by contemporary social factors such as racism and economic conditions. The model also explains how such knowledge can be used to make African American families and communities viable institutions for growth and development (Nobles, Goddard, Cavil, & George, 1987). African Feminism African feminism is a manifestation of the need to ensure the survival and resistance to oppression for African people (Steady, 1992). African feminism pays ← 56 | 57 → particular attention to the unique experiences of African women shaped by

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’, Journal of African Cultural Studies , 18 (Number 1, June 2006). Bayne, E. A. (1965), Four ways of politics: state and nation in Italy, Somalia, Israel, Iran (New York: American Universities Field Staff). ← 299 | 300 → Ben-Ghait Ruth and Fuller, Mia (ed.), (2005), Italian Colonialism , (New York: Palgrave Macmillan). Besteman, Catherine L.; Cassanelli, L. (1996), The struggle for land in southern Somalia: the war behind the war (Boulder, Colo; London: Westview Press & HAAN). Besteman, Catherine Lowe (1996), ‘Representing Violence and "Othering" Somalia’, Cultural

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(2000): 159–82. ←189 |  190→ —. Secretary of the Invisible: The Idea of Hospitality in the Fiction of J. M. Coetzee . Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2009. Mcmahan, Jeff. “Torture and Collective Shame.” In J. M. Coetzee and Ethics , edited by Anton Leist and Peter Singer, 89–105. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010. Meihuizen, N. C. T. “Beckett and Coetzee: Alternative Identities.” Literator 32, no. 1 (2011): 1–19. Meskell, Lynn, and Lindsay Weiss. “Coetzee on South Africa’s Past: Remembering in the Time of Forgetting.” American Anthropologist 108

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postcolonial fiction and African society; on the feminist and novelist Olive Schreiner; on aspects and moments of South African cultural history. She has also been working on gender and women’s studies and has observed the emergence of new, creolised expressions in the West (Black Britain, postcolonial Italy) and elsewhere. From 1987 to 1995, she edited a series of African and Caribbean fiction in Italian and later acted as a consultant for Italian publishers. In recent years, she has researched and published on the new Italian literature produced by writers of African