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, Thomas. 1997. The Viewer Society: Michel Foucault’s ‘Panopticon’ Re- visited. Theoretical Criminology 1 (2): 215-234. Mehta, Michael, and Eric Darier. 1998. Virtual Control and Disciplining on the In- ternet: Electronic Governmentality in the New Wired World. The Information Society 14 (2): 107-116. Microreviews. 2009. Google-Doubleclick. Accessed May 13, 2009. http://microreviews.org/files/2009/10/google-doubleclick.gif. Miller, Seumas, and John Weckert. 2000. Privacy, the Workplace and the Internet. Journal of Business Ethics 28 (3): 255-265. Murakami Wood

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structure can be hidden to the environment. From an outside perspective such a virtual organisation appears to be structured like a huge and com- plex trust, and features like formalism and complexity are only imitated with this structure. Nevertheless, the performance of a virtual organisation and the services it is able to deliver are equivalent to those provided by a highly formalised hierarchical- bureaucratic organisation. Information processing and the structure of the flow of information play key roles in the ability of virtual organisations to perform in

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increase the network’s overall performance through internal competition. 256 If a network organisation has the additional characteristic of being only virtually existent, it is called a virtual organisation. With this specific pattern the lack of a formally and well-defined hierarchical-bureaucratic structure can be hidden to the environment. From an outside perspective such a virtual organisation appears to be structured like a huge and complex trust, and features like formalism and complexity are only imitated with this structure. Nevertheless, the performance of

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published in 1993, around the time the World Wide Web was invented and the Internet became accessible to the general public. More recently, the mediated versus real-world experience, or online- offline dichotomy, has become a less dominant perspective in communication studies. Rather, the confusion about what is virtual, meaning what seems real but is ultimately a mere simulation, and what is real, has recently been ac- knowledged as a part of the online communication discourse. The distinction between offline and online communication has become increasingly

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(4), 2009, pp. 405–421. Dowling, Grahame R. / Staelin, Richard: “A Model of Perceived Risk and Intended Risk-handling Activity.” Journal of Consumer Research 21(1), 1994, pp. 119–134. Dutta, Soumitra, et al.: The New Internet World: A Global Perspective on Freedom of Expression, Privacy, Trust and Security Online. The Global Information Technology Report 2010–2011 . New York, World Economic Forum, 2011. retrieved 8.4.2014, from http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1916005 . Dwyer, Catherine, et al.: Trust and Privacy Concern within Social Networking Sites: A Comparison of

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the authenticity illusions in social media. Dilemmas in Online Trust Already before digital technology and new web genres had altered how we communicate, inauthentic personas and fake content surfaced as key fears in debates about the Internet. The Internet always seemed to be the perfect medium for constructing reality, and among the dominant conceptions of the Internet in the early 1990s was the so-called “virtual reality” that might replace real-world experiences with a host of computer-simulated imaginary ones (Rheingold, 1991; Turkle, 1995). One of the earliest

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problem of choosing a further strategy of life in a situation of consequences most often unpredictable. There is not a single, unified point of view on the beginning of the processes of globalization, especially economic ones. Some researchers believe that it was the beginning of the 16th century, when colonialism appeared, that the “capitalist world system” emerged for the first time. According to another point of view, the beginning of globalism refers to the time of the appearance of international economic entities, such as concerns and trusts. Some other points of

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: • maintaining “trust, integrity, and candor” in the world of “fake news”; • being “nimble and effective” in response to the constant and rapid changes; • mitigating reputation risks in a very fraught environment; • developing talent and competences in response to globalization, digitalizing, and integration of marketing and communication functions; • understanding the strategic role of communication in customer and employee engagement; • dealing successfully with the “new reporting lines” that result from the merging of communication and marketing; and, helping

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: Butterworth-Heinemann. Baert, P. and Shipman, A. (2005). University Under Siege? Trust and Account- ability in the Contemporary Academy. European Societies, 7(1), 157-185. Bartels, R. (1976). The History of Marketing Thought. Columbus, Ohio: Grid. Bauman, Z. (2000). Liquid Modernity. Cambridge: Polity Press. Beck, U. (2002). The Terrorist Threat: World Risk Society Revisited. Theory, Cul- ture and Society, 19(4), 39-55. Pop Brands 188 Borden, N. (1964). The Concept of the Marketing Mix. Journal of Advertising Re- search, June (4), 2-7. Botterill, J. (2007

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a liberal perspective. Environmental activism and “virtual social capital” 163 The liberal perspective The liberal perspective emphasises the importance of individual rights and free- doms and the need for a vibrant civic life to constrain and counterbalance the excesses of government interference. In this perspective social networks that facilitate trust, coordination and cooperation help to create obligations and mu- tual confidence which benefit individuals and communities. The saying “its not what you know but who you know” is part of the meaning