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, to Body, Minimal and Conceptual Art. Ran sets out, initially, on an exploration regarding the cultural usage and understanding of space and time, key aspects of Installation art. In this way, these terms are described as human ideas, or constructs as opposed to natural phenomena. For the ancients, we are told, time seemed to take the shape of a perpetual present, while Medieval allegory renders the past and present similar, while space (above-below) was symbolic. It is the advent of perspec- tive that turns these symbolic relationships between objects, fore

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imagined nation 38, 40, 57, 76 International Border Commissions of North and South 91 International Commission Control (of Albania) 91 international intervention 9, 142 inter-state border relations 18 Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes 132, 133 Kosovar Albanians 16, 117, 122, 136, 148, 167, 169, 174, 197, 202, 208, 220 Kosovo 6–40, 56–63, 71–75, 83–247 Kosovo Liberation Army 59 Kosovo Republic 59, 189–203 Kurdistan 137 “Lahuta e Malcise” 73, 126 League of Prizren 30, 68, 77–80, 101, 111, 235 Legality Party 246 lobby actor 61 Macedonia 6, 18–30, 72, 131–132, 140

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the Greek Catholic Archbishop of the Romanians in Transylvania. He introduced from the beginning of his intervention an interesting dissociation in the manner the language issue was understood by a part of the ecclesiastical elite in modern Hungary: the dissociation between the language of the State and the national language, seen as a “gift from God”. The Archbishop argued that, although there should not be any tensions between the two different channels of expression, the interest with which the government sought to impose the language of the State to the non

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period of relative peace in which a trend to settle in lowlands is observed. It is possible that there were attempts to extend political control over the area, but the fact is that there are no noticeable changes in the patterns observed in production and distribution of ceramics or in the burial types, mainly b and c at this point. Therefore, no disruption in the cyclic settlement pattern can be observed as a consequence of the intervention of the Visigothic state, the aristocracy or of the ← 154 | 155 → Church. It is likely that the Visigothic kings had more

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during the years of the ministry of this prelate from Ampurias3. This might also be the context of the arrival of a wooden group – the Deposition from the Cross – datable to the early thirteenth century and belonging to the building’s Medieval furnishings4, currently kept at the town’s parish house of San Sebastiano. Beyond certain items that are presumably original but not yet properly datable, the status of unicum of the epigraphic bean in Sar- dinia’s Medieval landscape bears witness to the extreme rarity of the conser- vation of wooden roofs at contemporary

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’s conception of the mysterium. Instead there is a yearning for such an intervention and the charting of repeated failure of patterns to unfold. John could be considered as a secular version of the allegorical Everyman figure who questions the notion of salvation as it occurs in the medieval morality play. Indeed, McPherson teases that John may die after Christmas and would thus have to face judgement just as in the famous medieval text. He has John describe ← 142 | 143 → how he would like to die and what he would like his funeral to be in part one, and then toward the end

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diagnosis of the medieval culture and, more precisely, literature, entails a fairly prescriptive stance on the question of beauty and turpitude. Views on what beauty was deemed to be in the Middle Ages appear fairly consistent to us in various sources: Brewer summarizes one of the basic ones, Matthew of Vendôme’s ideal of female comeliness in Ars versificatoria exemplified by Helen of Troy, as: “her hair is golden, forehead white as paper, eyebrows black and thin . . . Her face is rosy, her colouring white and red, like rose and snow” (1955:258). White skin appears

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research group “Homo debilis. Social Integration and Challenges of Daily Life for Im- paired Persons in Historical Perspective” at the University of Bremen (Prof. Dr. Cordula Nolte). She has been visiting lecturer of medieval history at the Univer- sities of Bremen, Hannover and Lüneburg. Horn, Klaus Peter Klaus-Peter Horn studied medieval history and archaeology at the Universität Bamberg, Università Chieti (Italy) and Humboldt-Universität, Berlin. As a sci- entific assistant he joined an excavation company in Bamberg and is now lectur- er of medieval history at

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Archbishop of the Romanians in Transylvania. He introduced from the beginning of his intervention an inter- esting dissociation in the manner the language issue was understood by a part of the ecclesiastical elite in modern Hungary:  the dissociation between the language of the State and the national language, seen as a “gift from God”. The Archbishop argued that, although there should not be any tensions between the two different channels of expression, the interest with which the government sought to impose the language of the State to the non-Hungarian communi

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important starting point for postcolonial studies, such as the most influential works of Homi Bhabha. 17 The “personal factor” may be even more important for all pre-modern and especial medieval forms of empires. I suggested rather focusing on analyzing the personal elements of empires than on political entities. I therefore re-introduced the concept “imperiale Ordnungen”, 18 which might be translated as “imperial communities”. This concept or approach enables us to analyze the continuous interdependence of imperial ideas or knowledge of empires and the contemporary