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Narrativity in Action: Language, Culture and Text Preface The central role of narratives in social life has been proclaimed by many. On the word of the French semiologist and literary critic, Roland Barthes: “All classes, all human groups, have their narratives…” (Barthes (1977, p. 79) as cited in Czarniawska (2004, p. 1). Narrative, according to Barthes, is international, transhistorical and transcultural. The interest in the study of narratives originates in the literary theory. Polkinghorne (1987) as cited in Czarniawska (2004, p. 2) points at

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, immigration causing changes in, 213 – 216 Feminist approach to research, 28 Feminist epistimology, 27 – 28 Feminist theories and scholarship Black and Chicana, 26 – 27 , 86 , 260 focusing on counter narratives, 79 Foucault’s theory of power, 22 – 23 Fraser’s theory of social justice, 23 – 25 matrix of oppression in, 25 – 27 on motherhood, 70 , 72 , 73 – 75 symbolic violence and, 22 Young’s theory of social justice, 19 , 20 – 23 Feminization of poverty, 8 – 9 Foucault, M., 22 – 23 , 53 , 54

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About the book About the book Through the artful science of portraiture, The Pedagogy of Teacher Activism presents the stories of four teacher activists—how they are and have become social change agents—to uncover important pedagogical underpinnings of teacher activism. Embedded in their stories are moments of political clarity and consciousness, giving rise to their purpose as teacher activists. The narratives illuminate how both inner passions and those stirred by caring relationships with others motivate their work, while the intentional ways in which they

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Latremouille Jodi Latremouille is a doctoral candidate in Educational Research at the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, and a sessional instructor in the Master of Education program at Thompson Rivers University. Her research interests include hermeneutics, ecological and feminist pedagogy, social and environmental justice, life writing, and poetic inquiry. Sara A. Levy Sara A. Levy is Associate Professor of Education at Wells College. Her research focuses on heritage narratives, emotion in the social studies classroom, and difficult histories. Megan List

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cares?’, questions all researchers need to answer. It is at the outset of our narrative inquiries that we first meet the questions of so what and who cares. These questions draw us toward the need to justify our narrative inquiries in three ways: the personal, practical and social and theoretical justifications. We need to be mindful of considerations of social justice, of seeing how policies, practices and larger social, cultural and institutional narratives shape lives (Caine, Steeves, Clandinin et al. 2017). In part the autobiographical narrative inquiries and the

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.R.C. models can be reflected in dichotomies paralleling retributive vs. restorative justice, individual ← 142 | 143 → justice vs. social reconciliation, criminal justice vs. truth-seeking, etc. A holistic approach has been adopted by the U.N. to explain that the two forms are complementary. 13 A report regarding Darfur concludes: “[A] Truth and Reconciliation Commission could play an important role in ensuring justice and accountability. Criminal courts, by themselves, may not be suited to reveal the broadest spectrum of crimes that took place during a period of

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INDEX A Abstract individualism, 66 Advocacy, 81–82 consejos (words of wisdom), 48–49, 90–93 counter narratives and, 128 daughter interpreting for her mother, 177–180 efforts to switch teacher, 96–101 in the face of racism, 86–90 having sons focus on their studies, 82–85 linguistic, 202–211 Agency. See also Communal agency; Critical linguistic agency belonging and, 137 counter narratives and, 80, 81 knowing, belonging, and, 146–147 learning to drive and, 219 social justice and, 19, 20 structure and, 241–242 theory of structuration and, 241–242 ventriloquation

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. JEAN CLANDININ 9 Relational Commitments of Narrative Inquirers NOLWAZI MKHWANAZI 10 Social Justice and Transformation: Why Does Ethnography Matter? NOSIPHO MNGOMEZULU 11 Whose Voice Is It Anyway? Identification, Representation and Narrative in Ethnographic Practice TOMONORI ISHIOKA 12 Training under Uncertainty: Tempography of Underdog Filipino Pugilists PART IV Indigenous Ways of Being WILLIAM ELLIS 13 Vetkat’s Cinematic: Oneironauts of Critique in the Kalahari PAULINE ADAMS 14 Kimihia Te Kura Huna: Seeking an Authentic Māori Identity through Autoethnography

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, and consider its potential to transform students and teachers alike. This is an ideal text for courses in educational foundations, multicultural education, urban studies, sociology of education, English education, social justice education, literacy education, socio-cultural contexts of teaching, adult education, cultural studies, schools and communities, and popular education.

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that teaching wrongdoers moral lessons was an important feature of poetic justice, implying that by experiencing poetic justice, we learn how to be relationally moral. Second, it was indicated by our participants that stories of poetic justice are shared among members of social networks. Presumably, in addition to possible entertainment value, narratives of poetic justice function to inform and remind listeners of the right and wrong ways to interact. Cultural narratives carry moral and explanatory value and are used in interpersonal dialogue for specific purposes