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, Barbara Smith, Sonia Sanchez, Patricia Bell Scott, June Jordan, Audre Lorde, Patricia Hill Collins, and bell hooks brought issues of race, sex, gender, class, and sexual orientation which concerned the Black Women’s movement51 to the forefront of discussion in Black Studies. Later, the emergence of Black Women’s Studies52 as an academic discipline generated a dialogue within African American Studies that resulted in challenging the existing epistemologies53 that did not incorporate the significant presence and contributions of African American women in the dis

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History of Black Women in America (1998), and Black Women in America, Historical Encyclopedia Volumes I, II, III, coedited with Elsa Barkley Brown (2005). She also edited, in 1990, Three Essays: Black Studies in the United States (The Ford Foundation). Her seminal textbook The African-American Odyssey (1999) is widely used. Dr. John W. Blassingame (1940–2000) Dr. Blassingame was an African American scholar, historian, educator, writer, and leading pioneer in the study of American slavery. He was a key participant in some of the earliest debates and dialogues about

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affirmative action milestones. Retrieved March 6, 2002, from http://www.factmonster.com/spot/affirmativetimeline1.html#1965 Bunting, I. (1994). A legacy of inequality: Higher education in South Africa. Rondebosch, South Africa: UCT Press. 242 whiteness is the new south africa Burke, J. B., & Johnstone, M. (2004). Access to higher education: The hope for democratic schooling in America. Higher Education in Europe, 29(1), 19–31. Cannon, K. G. (1995). Katie’s canon: Womanism and the soul of the Black community. New York: Continuum. Carim, N. (1999). School effectiveness in

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of American Folk- lore, 78: 307, 3 – 20. Bloch, M. J., Beoku-Betts, J. & Tabachnick, B. (eds. 1998): Women and Education in Sub- Saharan Africa: Power, Opportunities and Constraints. Boulder. Boateng, F. (1990): African Traditional Education: A Tool for Intergenerational Communica- tion. In: Asante, M. K. & Asante, K. W. (eds.): African Culture: The Rhythms of Unity. Trenton, NJ, 109 – 122. Dei, G. J. S. (2000): The Role of Indigenous Knowledges in the Academy. In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, 4: 2, 39 – 56. Dei, G. J. S. (2004a): Dealing

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70s and on. 3. See Patricia Jones-Jackson, When Roots Die; Melville J. Herskovits, The Myth of the Negro Past; Marion Kraft, The African Continuum and Contemporary African American Writers: Their Literary Presence and Ancestral Past; Maureen Warner-Lewis, Guinea’s Other Suns, Trinidad Yoruba and Central Africa in the Caribbean ; Robert Farris Thompson, Flash of the Spirit; Edward Kamau Brathwaite, History of the Voice; John W. Pulis (ed.) Religion, Diaspora and Cultural Identity: A Reader in the Anglophone Caribbean; Albert J. Raboteau, Slave Religion: The

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: technological colonization, manifest destiny, and the frontier myth in Facebook’s public pedagogy. Educational Studies, 46, 503–523. Furniss, G., & Gunner, l. (1995). Power, marginality, and African oral literature. Melbourne: Cambridge university Press. Gabbin, J. V. (1990). a laying on of hands: Black women writers exploring the roots of their folk and cultural tradition. In J. M. Braxton & a. N. Mclaughlin (eds.), Wild women of the whirlwind: Afro-American culture and the contemporary literary renaissance (pp. 246–263). New Brunswick, NJ: rutgers university Press

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Part 1 Theories of Critical Black studies Part 1 offers perspectives on critical Black studies that ground the Black experience, offers fresh ideas and concepts to the study of the Black experience, and offers strategical or social change theories. Thus, theoretical perspectives are offered that serve not only african american studies but also the broader areas of ethnic, Women and Gender, and Cultural studies. drawing from postcolonial frameworks, in chapter 1, “remarks on Frantz Fanon’s Thought: deconstructing ‘White Mythologies,’ domenica Maviglia offers

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at Rio Nuevo in St. Mary, Jamaica, a site that sits in the neighborhood where my family resides. As the Spanish fled, they freed the slaves so that the British would not have them. These slaves escaped into the mountains along with the remaining Native Americans, setting in motion the forging of Maroon societies. A Terrible Trade: The Development of the Slave Trade and Slavery On the continent of Africa, Africans were collected by small coastal tribes carrying out raids against the people. They captured men, women, and chil- dren and then sold them into

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african americans of ways to properly conduct themselves during a police encounter so as not to get killed. They perpetuate society’s impropriety of placing the onus for staying alive on the potential victim, as opposed to holding a corrupt and racist system, maintained by corrupt and racist officers, accountable for their abhorrent actions. This is equivalent to telling women how to conduct themselves so as not to get raped, as opposed to holding rapists accountable for their heinous violence against women. C h a p t e r 1 9 When the Church Sins The Violence of

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fiction; US gender studies are pioneered by the theses of Angels Carabí Ribera on Toni Mor- rison (Barcelona, 1987), Esther Álvarez López on Afro-American women’s fiction (Oviedo, 1989) and Carlos Martín Gaebles (Seville, 1989) on gay fiction. Isabel Carrera Suarez’s comparative study of short story women writers (Oviedo, 1988) is the first to adopt a transnational approach to women’s literature, combining postcolonial and gender theory. Mercedes Bengoechea Bartolomé’s work on Adrienne Rich (Madrid, 1991) opens the productive 1990s with a study of language and