Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 152 items for :

  • All: The/African Continuum/and/African/American/Women/Writers x
  • Science, Society and Culture x
Clear All
Restricted access

Series:

the visceral joys and agonies of a child’s coming of age. I shall argue that much guilty, confessional writing of white, English- speaking women (and men)2 There has been in recent years a proliferation of texts, autobiographies as well as autobiographical texts presented as novels, which narrate white southern African stories from a profoundly personal angle, texts which resurrect childhood in order to construct a present truth. This is a new phenomenon. As Lütge Coullie points out, during apartheid when writers like Ezekiel Mphahlele and Bessie Head were

Restricted access

Notes on contributors Raffaella Baccolini teaches Gender Studies and American Literature at the Uni- versity of Bologna, Forlì. She has published several articles on dystopia and science fiction, trauma literature, women’s writing, memory, and modernist literature. She is the author of Tradition, Identity, Desire: Revisionist Strategies in H. D.’s Late Poetry (Patron, 1995) and has edited several volumes, among which are Dark Horizons: Science Fiction and the Dystopian Imagination (with T. Moylan, Routledge, 2003), Le prospettive di genere: discipline

Restricted access

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS Charlotte Baker is Lecturer in French in the Department of European Languages and Cultures at Lancaster University. She completed a PhD in Twentieth Century French and Francophone Literatures at the University of Nottingham in 2007, and her current research focuses on marginalised and stigmatised groups in sub-Saharan Africa. Charlotte is particularly interested in the fictional work of Guinean writer Williams Sassine and recently published her first monograph, Enduring Negativity: Representations of Albinism in the Fictional Work

Restricted access

The Global North and South: Comparative Postcolonial Poetics in Diasporic South Asian Women’s Texts JASPAL KAUR SINGH The Global North and South The Global North and South c h a p t e r s i x This chapter examines the poetics of resistance to gendered identity formations in Diasporic South Asian Women’s texts and their interconnections to the In- dian and South African nation- states. I argue that in their re- envisioning of Indianness and Indian womanhood, certain writers are themselves limited due to their location and class politics. I examine texts

Restricted access

Series:

Sources Adamson, L. B., Foster, M. A., Roark, M. L., & Reed, D. B. (1998). Doing a science project: Gender differences during childhood. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 35(8), 845–857. Adenika-Marrow, T. J. (1996). A lifeline to science careers for African American females. Edu- cational Leadership, 53(8), 80–83. Adigwe, J. C. (1992). Gender differences in chemical problem solving amongst Nigerian stu- dents. Research in Science and Technology Education, 10(2), 187–201. Allen, E. J. (2003). Constructing women’s status: Policy discourses of the

Restricted access

and about women regarding lesbian sexu- ality. That the majority of the texts happen to be by Muslim writers, with a few by Hindu women, is incidental, although the discussion of religion in these texts becomes important. “Most Muslims,” according to Imam Pamela Taylor, “believe homosexuality is a sin . . . The Quran, like the Bible, has passages . . . about the people of Sodom” (Hijab xiii), which lead many, Muslims and Christians alike, to believe that these texts forbid acts of homosexuality since it is sinful to engage in same- sex sexual relationships (a

Restricted access

Series:

global capital- ism’, Critical Inquiry 20/2 (1994), 328–56. Durlauf, Steven and Lawrence Blume, eds, The New Palgrave Dictionary of Econom- ics Online. (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008) <http://www.dictionaryofeconomics. com> Accessed 6 July 2011. Dussel, Enrique, The Invention of the Americas: Eclipse of the ‘Other’ and the Myth of Modernity, Michel D. Barber, trans. (New York: Continuum, 1995). Eisenstein, Hester, Feminism Seduced: How Global Elites use Women’s Labour and Ideas to Exploit the World (London: Paradigm Publishers, 2009). Ellison, Ralph, Invisible Man (New

Open access

Series:

an African literary context. The trilogy was written with its author in exile from his native Somalia, an exile that has continued from 1976 till this day. (Fearing that he had fallen foul of the Somali political regime after the publication of his novel A Naked Needle, Farah did not return home after his studies in London.) While the scholarship of the African ‘dictatorship novel’ is not as developed as the study of this sub-genre of Latin-American novels, including, most notably, Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s The Autumn of the Patriarch and Mario Vargas Llosa

Restricted access

educational training—many critics felt that the show overlooked social issues common to black women.2 It was, however, a substantial step forward from the clichéd portrayals of African-American women working in subservient roles as domestics (or “mammies”) in pre- vious series such as The Beulah Show (1950–1953) or the later programme, Gimme a Break (1981–1987). While issues pertaining to the civil rights movement and the women’s rights movement increasingly made their way into network programming through the 1970s in the form of politically progressive shows such as, “The

Restricted access

Series:

existential deviation and traumatic severing from place and past on ‘the African’,4 Woods argues that contemporary African writers not only have to find strategies ‘to aid in the reconceptualisation of culture, but also of history and memory, and to organize and articulate the trauma and disruption 1 The research carried out for the writing of this essay is part of a research project financed by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (MICINN) and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) (code HUM2007–61035). 2 Tim Woods, African Pasts: Memory and History