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–515. Print. ---. South African National Cinema. London and New York: Routledge, 2007. Print. “Making Tsotsi.” Tsotsi: The Official Film Site. 6 June 2009. Web. “Maori Women in Focus.” Ministry of Women’s Affairs. April 1999. Web. 25 June 2007. Marchetti, Gina. “Action-Adventure as Ideology.” Cultural Politics in Contem porary America. Ed. Ian Angus and Sut Jhally. New York: Routledge, 1989. 182-197. Print. Margetts, Jayne. “Deepa’s Doctine.” Celluloid Interview. 4 February 2010. Web. Marks, Laura. The Skin of the Film: Intercultural Cinema, Embodiment, and

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-52. Bost, Suzanne. Mulattas and Mestizas: Representing Mixed Identities in the Americas, 1850-2000. Athens, GA: U of Georgia P, 2003. Colleran, Jeanne. “South African Theatre in the United States: the allure of the familiar and the exotic.” Ed. Derek Attridge and Rosemary Jolly. Writing South Africa. 221-38. A Coloured Place. By Malika Ndlovu (Lueen Conning). Dir. Malika Ndvolu (Lueen Conning). Perf. Chantal Snyman. Durban, SA, Southern Life Playhouse Company Women’s Arts Festival at the Playhouse. 1996. DaCosta, Kimberly. Making Multiracials: State, Family

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by white women then black people would never achieve anything as a community, Introduction 3 as a people, as a race.’ (9) To this challenge, Phillips opposes white suprem- acy which, through the ‘Jim Crow’ laws, warned African-American males that any attempt, real or imagined, at an interracial relationship could lead to lynching. Phillips (1984, 10) refers in particular to the boxer Jack Johnson who, despite having become the first African-American heavyweight champion in 1908, was harassed all his life ‘for having the audacity to parade with a white woman

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and Zora Neale Hurston are possible, as well as those by recent playwrights like August Wilson and George C. Wolfe. III During his tenure as Director for the Center for African and African-American Studies at the Atlanta (now Clark Atlanta) University, in a series of discussions entitled, "Africa and America: Essays in Afro-American Culture," Long presented his conceptualization of Black Core values. For our purposes here we will draw from two within the series. The first, "The African Continuum: From the Black Core," puts forth the paradigm, addressing the

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his controversial portrayal of Madea (Aldridge, 2011; Mask, 2012) as further proof that his work is detrimental to the African American community (Colbert, 2011). The character Madea has generated a significant amount of criticism from within the African American community against Perry. Critics have said that the Madea character perpetuates stereotypes (Svetkey et al., 2009). In a recent study focused on the Madea character and African American women’s reaction to that character, study participant Alicia, a 59-year-old mother and community orga- nizer, said

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would like it. He’s always on about a woman’s place and the man being a hunter.’ (15) Indeed, Errol’s radicalism only exac- erbates his violence and machismo. Concerning the latter trait, he is shown following in the footsteps of famous leaders of the American civil rights movement such as Trinidadian-born Stokely Carmichael quoted by Susan Brownmiller (1999, 14) as having declared: ‘What is the position of women in SNCC? The position of women in SNCC is prone.’ Errol’s machismo also translates into a lack of respect for his mother. He rudely reproaches her for

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monologues, in Lloyd Richards's impressively acted production, often rise to musical eloquence. Wilson leaves it to the audience to pull together his interlocking themes of economics, self- esteem and spirituality. What we witness is not a play about the '60s, but a form of oral history, in which we're invited to eavesdrop on the timeless continuum of the African-American experience. These are the stories behind the political slogans, Wilson implies: listen and learn. ( 141) Ultimately, Wilson ties up all the stories. Sterling has finally lured Risa out of her nun

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the secular world in relation to the body. The use of dance in spiritual practice regularly causes debates about the place of sexuality within reli- gious traditions. Movement Three – The Marriage Myth The concept of the relation between the sexes changed in the eighteenth century: The one-sex model of embodiment, that had dominated European political thought and practice for nearly two millennia, gave way to a two-sex model that posited men and women as incommensurate opposites, rather than as embodied souls ordered along a continuum on the basis of proximity

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and Criticism, ed. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999), 304–307. 13 Graham, 50. 14 Michael Richardson, Otherness in Hollywood Cinema (New York: Continuum International Publishing, 2010), 5–15; Elise M. Marubbio, Killing the Indian Maiden: Image of Native American Women in Film (Lexington: The University of Kentucky Press, 2006), 5–6; Daniel Bernardi, “The Voice of Whiteness,” 117. 15 Cesare Lombroso, Criminal Man, trans. Mary Gibson and Nicole Hahn Rafter (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2006), 58–59, 222–223. 16

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the women in his life proved to be the protectors of his safety. Not only were they the protectors of the domestic sphere that is traditionally reserved for the feminine, but their power transcended the boundaries of the household to permeate Perry’s entire self-hood with a mes- sage of hope for a better future. Finally, the mere fact that Perry connects to a broad audience and shares ver- sions of the African American experience with the world is a testament to the impact of Madea’s cinematic success. Although he relies on the popularity and notoriety of Madea