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  • All: The African Continuum and African American Women Writers x
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American studies? • What is Africana Women’s Studies? Should it be incorporated within African American Studies or should it function as a separate field of study? • What is Black, Gay and Lesbian Studies? Should it be incorporated within African American Studies or should it function as a separate field of study? • What is Hip-Hop Studies? Should it be incorporated within African American Studies or should it function as a separate field of study? • What is Critical Black Studies? Should it be incorporated within African American Studies or should it function as

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History of Black Women in America (1998), and Black Women in America, Historical Encyclopedia Volumes I, II, III, coedited with Elsa Barkley Brown (2005). She also edited, in 1990, Three Essays: Black Studies in the United States (The Ford Foundation). Her seminal textbook The African-American Odyssey (1999) is widely used. Dr. John W. Blassingame (1940–2000) Dr. Blassingame was an African American scholar, historian, educator, writer, and leading pioneer in the study of American slavery. He was a key participant in some of the earliest debates and dialogues about

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affirmative action milestones. Retrieved March 6, 2002, from http://www.factmonster.com/spot/affirmativetimeline1.html#1965 Bunting, I. (1994). A legacy of inequality: Higher education in South Africa. Rondebosch, South Africa: UCT Press. 242 whiteness is the new south africa Burke, J. B., & Johnstone, M. (2004). Access to higher education: The hope for democratic schooling in America. Higher Education in Europe, 29(1), 19–31. Cannon, K. G. (1995). Katie’s canon: Womanism and the soul of the Black community. New York: Continuum. Carim, N. (1999). School effectiveness in

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appreciation of the African past, including its civilizations, culture, values, and political systems. These pioneers of Pan-Africanism included Martin Delaney, an abolitionist, soldier, writer and physician, and one of the first proponents of Black nationalism; Alexander Crummell, probably the first Black to graduate from Cam- bridge University, an Episcopal clergyman, educator, and American missionary to Liberia; Edward W. Blyden, a native of Saint Thomas (U.S. Virgin Islands) who became a Liberian statesman and theorist of the concept of “African personality;” Henry

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Diaspora books 235 films 236 journals 235 reference works 234 scholarly articles 236 theses 235 websites 237 for teaching about African Diaspora books 237 copyright and fair use 238 podcasts 237 scholarly articles 237 websites 238 for teaching Africa books 233 Bight of Benin 16, 121–122 Biko, Steve 78–79 Biography of a Runaway Slave 62 birth control means 38–39 Black and Blackness in Central America, Between Race and Place 166–167 Black Baptist preachers 141 Black Brazilian women 54 Black churches 70–71 Black citizenship 159 Black communities 84 Black consciousness

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of American Folk- lore, 78: 307, 3 – 20. Bloch, M. J., Beoku-Betts, J. & Tabachnick, B. (eds. 1998): Women and Education in Sub- Saharan Africa: Power, Opportunities and Constraints. Boulder. Boateng, F. (1990): African Traditional Education: A Tool for Intergenerational Communica- tion. In: Asante, M. K. & Asante, K. W. (eds.): African Culture: The Rhythms of Unity. Trenton, NJ, 109 – 122. Dei, G. J. S. (2000): The Role of Indigenous Knowledges in the Academy. In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, 4: 2, 39 – 56. Dei, G. J. S. (2004a): Dealing

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p a r t   1 Slavery and Emancipation in the Americas c h a p t e r o n e Afro-Latin Americans Within and Beyond Colonial Enslavement rachel sarah o’toole1 Africans and their descendants—enslaved and free, men and women—were simul- taneously included and excluded from colonial regimes throughout Latin America. Spaniards and Portuguese colonists enslaved and exploited people who scholars now claim as Afro-Latin Americans based on a racial ideology that defined Blacks and blackness as ineligible for inclusion in either the Republic of the Spaniards or

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70s and on. 3. See Patricia Jones-Jackson, When Roots Die; Melville J. Herskovits, The Myth of the Negro Past; Marion Kraft, The African Continuum and Contemporary African American Writers: Their Literary Presence and Ancestral Past; Maureen Warner-Lewis, Guinea’s Other Suns, Trinidad Yoruba and Central Africa in the Caribbean ; Robert Farris Thompson, Flash of the Spirit; Edward Kamau Brathwaite, History of the Voice; John W. Pulis (ed.) Religion, Diaspora and Cultural Identity: A Reader in the Anglophone Caribbean; Albert J. Raboteau, Slave Religion: The

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anywhere and become anyone has profoundly shaped our national psyche.” In America, the idea of mobility both “promises, and threatens, to incor- porate the outsider and to blur boundaries.” For Africans, the mobility of transport to America and the movement from slavery to freedom threatened the white status quo and blurred the promise of mobility as leaders promoted the idea of their “oth- erness.” Yet, acclaimed writer Ralph Ellison raised an important question in his 1970 Time magazine article, what would America be without African Americans? What would America be

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: technological colonization, manifest destiny, and the frontier myth in Facebook’s public pedagogy. Educational Studies, 46, 503–523. Furniss, G., & Gunner, l. (1995). Power, marginality, and African oral literature. Melbourne: Cambridge university Press. Gabbin, J. V. (1990). a laying on of hands: Black women writers exploring the roots of their folk and cultural tradition. In J. M. Braxton & a. N. Mclaughlin (eds.), Wild women of the whirlwind: Afro-American culture and the contemporary literary renaissance (pp. 246–263). New Brunswick, NJ: rutgers university Press