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second Black German Studies Seminar, ‘Political Activism in the Black European Diaspora: From eory to Praxis’ Seminar, German Studies Association Conference, 1–4 October 2015, Washington, DC. See also Barbara Smith, ‘A Press of Our Own Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press’, Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies, 10/3 (1989): 11–13, where she discusses similar dynamics for African American women. Introduction: Rethinking Black German Studies 13 analyzed the societies in which they lived, including Anton Wilhelm Amo, C. R. L. James, Frantz Fanon and Stuart Hall, to

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German audiences and practiced ‘connected dierences’ to other oppressed groups worldwide.51 Among these theorists, the work of Black women was emphasized, such as that of African American feminist and theorist bell hooks, as previously highlighted, and others such as Afro-Portuguese, Berlin-based writer, professor and artist, Grada Kilomba. e youth group integrated additional cultural texts of the African diaspora in the produc- tion, including the following: African American feminist and abolition- ist Sojourner Truth’s ‘Ain’t I a Woman?’ speech; the African

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Bibliography Abizadeh, Arash. “Was Fichte an Ethnic Nationalist? On Cultural Nationalism and Its Double.” History of Political Thought 26.2 (2005): 334–359. Print. Abu-Lughod, Lila. “Contentious Theoretical Issues: Third World Feminisms and Identity Politics.” Women’s Studies Quarterly 26.3/4 (1998): 25–29. Print. ——. “Do Muslim Women Really Need Saving? Anthropological Ref lections on Cultural Relativism and Its Others.” American Anthropologist 104.3 (2002): 783–790. Print. New Series. ——. “Islam and the Gendered Discourses of Death.” International Journal

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with the latter wave, as critics such as Cheesman (2004) and Ernst (2006) have demonstrated. As indicated by the distinction between ‘Popliteratur’ (a new wave of lit- erature from the mid-1990s, overwhelmingly by young male writers) and the so-called ‘Fräuleinwunder’ (referring to the ‘miraculous’ wave of work by young women writers from the late 1990s) gendered division marked the reception of the emerging German literature of that decade. Indeed, many of the texts from the 1990s and 2000s participate in hyperbolic yet crisis-ridden performances of

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based environmental consultant Chandran Nair calls for an Asian-led reconsideration of Western consumption-driven capitalism in his 2011 book Consumptionomics: Asia’s Role in Reshaping Capitalism and Saving the Planet.11 Nair has criticised Fukuyama for the latter’s “odd view of the world based on an inherent belief in American exceptionalism.”12 However, one might also argue that, at first glance, Nair’s suggested approach is implicitly predicated on dwelling-life ideals. First, he argues for localised political thinking: “We in Asia and in Africa must start

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to one other German actor in the years since 1999).1 Dresen received extensive praise. The film itself was nominated for a Golden Bear, losing out to the American epic war film The Thin Red Line (dir. Terence Malick, 1998). Andreas Dresen was well aware of the significance of the 1999 Berlinale for his future: Das werde ich auch mein Lebtag nicht vergessen, obwohl ich so gelitten habe und so fertig war wie noch nie vorher in meinem Leben, weil ich wusste genau, an dieser Vorführung wird sich meine berufliche Existenz entscheiden.2 At the German Film Awards

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approaches, so too approaches our return’.12 Feuchtwanger’s views of living in Germany and his concept of himself as a writer were intertwined. He expressed this perspective in the after- word for his novel Exil: ‘I am convinced that the outcome of this war will allow me to return to Germany and give me the possibility to conclude the Waiting Room series with an epilogue called Return’.13 Years later when Feuchtwanger began to seriously consider leaving America, he turned to those friends and colleagues who had already trav- elled to Europe. He gleaned information

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St. Gallen as Dürrenmatt- Strasse, oddly enough in order to underscore his (factually presented) statement that “the very same” prominent Swiss banks “that helped to cause the most serious economic and social crisis in a generation” had supported the Apartheid regime. The Senegalese writer Bouabacar Boris Diop is the only commentator so far to engage with the content of the text in more depth. He does so in a short essay (2015) on Dürrenmatt’s collaboration with Djibril Diop Mambétty, who adapted Der Besuch der alten Dame (The Visit, 1956) to an African

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character’s point of view is generally male. But many novelists choose to focus on a female point of view, which symbolizes the “home front”, a subject that interests increasingly cultural historians. The writers describe the tasks expected of women and girls as their participation in the war effort (knitting, nursing, writing as war godmo- thers) and they depict the replacement of men by women in fields, in factories or at school. In this study, I examine some fictional works written especially for children and teenagers in France and England today (except comic

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, Virginia. The People Could Fly. American Black Folktales . New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1985. Hirsch, Marianne, and Miller, Nancy K. (eds.). Rites of Return. Diaspora Poetics and the Politics of Memory . New York: Columbia University Press, 2011. Kelly, Natasha A. “Afroism”. Zur Situation einer ethnischen Minderheit in Deutschland . Saarbrücken: VDM Verlag, 2008. Kraft, Marion. The African Continuum and African-American Women Writers. Their Literary Presence and Ancestral Past . Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1995. Mayer, Ruth. Diaspora. Eine kritische