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  • All: The African Continuum and African American Women Writers x
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processes on the state and civil society, and democratisation and development, with a particular interest in the politics of economic reform and poverty reduction in Latin America. Lorraine Kelly is currently a lecturer in Spanish at NUI Galway, and has previously lectured at University College Cork, the University of Limerick and Dublin Institute of Technology. Her research and teaching is primarily in the area of Latin American literature and she has published articles and contributed to edited collections in the area of Mexican women writers. She is also the co

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People’, Marie Claire South Africa (December 1997) 20–4. Hitchcott, Nicki, Women Writers in Francophone Africa (Oxford: Berg, 2000). ——, and Laila Ibnlfassi, eds, African Francophone Writing: A Critical Introduction (Oxford: Berg, 1996). Hogan, Patrick, The Culture of Conformism: Understanding Social Consent (Durham: Duke University Press, 2001). Holloway, Judith, Changing the Subject: Psychology, Social Regulation and Subjectivity (London: Routledge, 1998). Hong, E., H. Zeeb and M. Repacholi, ‘Albinism in Africa as a Public Health Issue’, BMC Public Health, 6

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Africa. They have set forth a vital critical agenda drawing attention to the modes of representation of women in these literatures as well as to the many forms of gender violence inflicted during colonialism and its aftermath. Pointing out the inequality underpinning the conditions of production, circula- tion and reception of texts by female writers in the many different parts of the so- called Lusophone world, critical work in the field has prompted important debates exposing the pivotal role of colonial and revolutionary patriarchy in the different socio

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racism, sexism and class discrimina- tion pervasive in American society (and beyond). In conjunction with these understandings of the term, the militant women whose work is included in this book construct challenges to dis- course with the publication of their writing, thus practising a form of textual subterfuge. These texts operate as counterdiscourse owing to the rendering of the moudjahidate as feminine symbols of the ‘populist’ FLN struggle which gave credence to the goals of the uprising. In a substantive way, their individual accounts also question

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, 1919, The Year of Racial Violence: How African Americans Fought Back (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015), 42. Poetry of colour 43 after their armed service went largely unrewarded and clearly appropriates the ideologies of noble self-sacrifice and manly fortitude that saturated nationalist war propaganda.’30 Those 1919 lynchings were also the focus of a celebrated poem by the African American poet Langston Hughes, who with Claude McKay was to play a prominent part in the ‘New Negro’ movement of the Harlem Renaissance. Langston Hughes was only seventeen

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in the old country, it is simply in their nature to be frugal despite the better living and economic conditions that America provided. (silva 136) Prejudice against the Portuguese is also present in Zora neale hurston’s Seraph on the Suwanee (1948), a novel about the white crackers that includes a Portuguese fisherman and his American family. hurston, an African-American southerner and former FWP writer in Florida, wrote several novels, an autobiography, and folklore collections. In Seraph on the Suwanee, prejudice is detectable in the descrip- interior

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Paulo Pepe and Ana Raquel Fernandes Introduction: Revisiting Identities Although the twenty- first century is well underway, sex, sexuality and gender remain controversial and taboo subjects around the world. Even if certain cultures seem to be more forthcoming in discussing aspects of sexu- ality, holistic discussions remain in short supply. When open conversations on sexuality are held, they frequently focus on heterosexual, monogamous and marital issues; traditional, heteronormative values remain enshrined in custom and law. Binary categories such as men/women

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). Trad. Nicolás Rosa. Barthes, Roland (1973 [1957]) Mythologies (Frogmore: Paladin). Trad. no apare- ce. Bassnett, Susan (2007) “Culture and Translation”, en Piotr Kuhiwczak y Karin Littau (eds) A Companion to Translation Studies (Clevedon: Multilingual Mat- ters), 13-23. Bassnett, Susan (1999) “Translation 2000 – Difference and Diversity”, Textus. En- glish Studies in Italy, vol. XII, núm. 2: 213-218. Bassnett, Susan (1994) “The Visible Translator”, In Other Words 4: 11-15. Bassnett, Susan (ed.) (1990) Knives & Angels. Women Writers in Latin America (London and

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rester ce que je suis, je ressemble de loin à un métis’ (146). Milo’s desire to be recognised for métis rather than as a person with albinism represents a moderation of his extreme dif ference in favour of a less radical, but still problematic identity, in an attempt to be accepted. Such instances of pass- ing are true to life and there are several references in secondary literature to attempts by people with albinism to ‘pass’. Masha gives the example of urban women in Africa attempting to hide their albinism by perming and dying their hair.10 The act of

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, 2007), pp. 54–65; and Barbara Misztal, Theories of Social Remembering (Maidenhead: Open University Press, 2003). 10 Such usage of testimonio embraces fictional and non-fictional texts. 11 John Beverly, ‘The Margin at the Center: On Testimonio’, in The Real Thing: Testimonial Discourse and Latin America, ed. Georg Gugelberger (Durham: Duke University Eugenics and Annihilation in Francoist Women’s Prisons 191 La voz dormida of fers a collective account of torture and oppression experi- enced by women in Franco’s prisons. The characters have a desire to survive so