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- sponsibility towards that world. Here nature is performed not as visual landscape but as a haptic and audile world in which we are ethically involved. Next is Environment: Immersiveness and Interactivity. Informed by either radical theories and formalist conceptions of urban or virtual 36 Gabriella Giannachi & Nigel Stewart space and time and/or phenomenological philosophy, our third set of contributors reject what they see as the hubris of anthropocentric and ocularcentric conceptions of inhabitation and instead grasp environ- ment as the symbiotic interactivity between its

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rather than assumed. This is especially seen in La Jetée (1962), his film that is closest to a “pure” surrealist perspective’. (Michael Richardson, Surrealism and Cinema, p. 166). Postmodern Surrealism: Film in the Age of Virtual Reality 241 as an uncertain yet persistent trace of peacetime Paris which the child was bound to ‘carry with him for the whole war time’. The next set of still shots renders the violent event which the child witnessed as dispersed accumu- lation of impressions: the roar of a flight engine at take-off, the woman’s distressed gesture, the

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small nation such as Greece. Before Greek cinema is sold and promoted, critiqued and analysed, it needs to be made, and to be taught. In this final example of the multiplicity of contemporary Greek film cultures, the director/auteur and film theorist Antoinetta Angelidi, with Rea Walldén, offers a privileged perspective into making and teaching film in Greece. Drawing on her personal experience and examining some of her students’ films as case studies, Angelidi describes her method of teaching film direction in the Film School of the Aristotle University of

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, interrogating 37 See James Elkins, ‘Art History and Images That Are Not Art’, The Art Bulletin 77/4 (December 1995), 553–71. Introduction 19 female self- expression in a male- dominated world, and defining a mode of self- inscription through interactive platforms and the use of specific apps. Indeed, as demonstrated in this chapter, if the issue of technology and visibility takes a decisive role in the contemporary context, it has also produced a shift towards interaction resulting in major consequences on the way personal images are generated. The intimacy of the

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. One dimension of the paradigm dissolves cultural organisation within the centrifugal forces of chaos – the material world is reduced to elemental particles; in another, in which things are drawn into the realm of meaning, the landscape per- forms immanence – the visual materialisation of a metaphysical order that transcends language and meaning. In this perspective ‘landscape’ is de-historicised, naturalised as an aesthetic entity belonging to a second order of nature created by apprehension, the realm of virtual realities constructed by cultural and ideological

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Society for the Philosophy of Music Education Symposium, Helsinki Finland, June 9–13. Bradley, Ian (1993), The Celtic Way, London: Darton, Longman and Todd. Braidotti, Rosi (1994), Nomadic Subjects, New York: Columbia University Press. Braidotti, Rosi (1995), The Body as Metaphor: Seduced and Abandoned: The Body in the virtual world’ (1995), Videotape quoted in Ruth Mantin, Thealogies in Process: The Role of Goddess-talk in Feminist Spirituality, Unpublished PhD Thesis, May 2002, Southampton University. Bridges, Robert (1932), Poems. In Parrott, Thomas Marc and

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geographies of internationalism need to be mapped; novel modalities of articulation and intersection with imperialism (and anti-imperialism) need to be included 7 David Long and Brian C. Schmidt, eds, Imperialism and Internationalism in the Discipline of International Relations (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2005), 2. 8 Miguel Bandeira Jerónimo and José Pedro Monteiro, ‘Pasts to Be Unveiled: The Interconnections Between the International and the Imperial’, in idem, eds, Internationalism, Imperialism and the Formation of the Contemporary World: The

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Terms for Art History (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003), 356. 206 Gary Kafer point to something in the world – to refer to an object, as it were – and thus forms the basis of any claim that is understood to be true. However, referentiality poses an issue for every discourse that is presumably factual, such as documentary, autobiography, and self- portraiture. Because we very well know that media are often constructed using intentional aesthetic strategies within particular political agendas, philosophical viewpoints, or sociological frameworks, we

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Catholic Church, Italy and Britain, and Contemporary Perspectives. In the first chapter, Cristiana Furlan considers how, in the film Lamerica (1994), director Gianni Amelio forces contemporary Italy to come to terms with its recent past. Amelio says, ‘It is a film about two Italies, really – the Italy of my father and the Italy of today in which I live.’ Furlan argues that this film is also about a third Italy, as it developed during the fifty years that followed the Second World War. Tracing the journey of the protago- nist Gino through Albania, Furlan argues that

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impact? Furthermore, what can an investigation of the Italian artistic scene from the 1940s to the 1960s tell us about wider notions of the writing of cultural history, about the place of Cold War cultural historiography in our understanding of tourism and travel cultures in Italy since the Second World War, and about the myths of ‘la dolce vita’ that have energised them? In our previous work on these questions, we have investigated the representation of these travel cultures from a Hollywood perspective by looking at films made in Italy about visitors to Italy