Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 215 items for :

  • All: Trust and Virtual Worlds. contemporary Perspectives x
Clear All
Restricted access

Series:

- ognizes, shrunken to the size of an apple, the wrinkles and hair of the adult.” For the toy industry, like children’s publishing, always interacts with contemporary values and mores, instrumentalizing the psyche. (Warner, 2009, p. 15) The move to the development of online play facilities for young children in recent years can, therefore, be viewed as another indication of this phenomenon. In this chapter, I look at children’s playful engagement with an online Disney product, the virtual world Club Penguin. Virtual worlds offer important contexts for early socialisation

Restricted access

Series:

make it different? Invention, urbanization, technology—all these have obliterated most of the tidiness of living only with people like us. Like it or not, we repeatedly encounter diversity in its very many forms—people who don’t talk like us, dress like us, believe what we believe, raise their children by our values. We can’t even see or hear or touch many of these people—they’re only part of our virtual environ- ment, populating the World Wide Web. Exciting—but anxiety produc- ing. How do we know what to do next? xiv voices of early childhood educators

Restricted access

Series:

(work, education, home, entertainment) are becoming increasingly more blurred and consist of many different simultaneous modalities. (For instance, a professional designer working from home may work with an interconnected designing platform, engage in a chat with avatars in virtual worlds during an online seminar and answer per- sonal and professional emails from her Blackberry, all at the same time). Thorne, Black and Sykes (2009) underscore the influence the New London Group has had on research perspectives in language education and multimodality. Over a

Restricted access

. (lee.campbell@arts.ac.uk). Roelstraete, D. (2012). Responses to presentations. Presented at Smart Museum of Contemporary Art. c h a p t e r s e v e n t e e n Relating and Acting: Learning, Embodiment and Performance in Virtual Worlds mark childs and anna childs t h e r i s e a n d fa l l ( a n d r i s e ?) o f v i r t ua l w o r l d s Virtual worlds have been with us since the mid-1980s, defined as ‘A synchronous and persistent network of people and computer programs (embodied as avatars and agents), facilitated by networked computers, which uses navigable 3D space to engage the user

Restricted access

Series:

this line of exploration in the paper “Why Virtual Worlds Can Matter.” Here they discuss why shared interests provide a reason to come together, which ties into the perspective of Discourse within an affinity space. An affinity space and Discourses exist solely because people with shared interests have come together to create the space. MMOs allow for new affordances for the participants within them. They allow participants to transform and apply old practices to the new situations created in these virtual spaces, consequently creating new practices that only

Restricted access

Series:

Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Western science? These kinds of questions also relate to broader discus- sions of contemporary trends such as globalization and multiculturalism. The following provides an overview of the key characteristics of and con- temporary issues surrounding contemporary discussions of blending and/or integrating Indigenous and Western knowledge and philosophies of Nature. Perspectives and theories from Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars in North America and around the world are explored and supported with illus- trative examples of

Restricted access

Series:

a liberal perspective. Environmental activism and “virtual social capital” 163 The liberal perspective The liberal perspective emphasises the importance of individual rights and free- doms and the need for a vibrant civic life to constrain and counterbalance the excesses of government interference. In this perspective social networks that facilitate trust, coordination and cooperation help to create obligations and mu- tual confidence which benefit individuals and communities. The saying “its not what you know but who you know” is part of the meaning

Restricted access

Series:

virtual world is a collective of collaborators working together to solve problems and help one another, whereas many schools are still functioning under the system of each learner being an individual silo intentionally separated from others when it comes to doing work or solving problems. Working in a vacuum is an unrealistic model in contemporary education, when thinking about lifelong learning and potential employability. You might argue that school is focused on students being able to take standardized tests, which are important for their advancement through

Restricted access

Series:

world of the story being told, audience need to “suspend disbelief” and let themselves forget the world outside the picture frame. In the 1970s theorist Christian Metz described this entry into the virtual world as having two compo- nents.20 On one hand, in the darkened space of the movie theater with a large-sized projection and amplified sound, viewers can imagine themselves to be inside the story being told––at times pretending to be one of the characters. On the other hand, the viewer identifies with the perspective of the camera filming the story

Restricted access

Series:

opportunity and challenge. Washington, DC: National Science Foundation. Brathwaite, B., & Schreiber, I. (2009). Challenges for Game Designers: Non-digital Exercises for Video Game Designers. Boston, MA: Course Technology. Caillois, R. (2001). Man, play, and games (M. Barash, Trans.). Champaign: University of Illinois Press. Capra, F. (2002). The hidden connections: A science for sustainable living. London, England: HarperCollins. Castronova, E. (2009). Exodus to the virtual world: How online fun is changing reality. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Costikyan, G