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- entific mode of inquiry. Such an assumption of difference leads to the analyst imposing or transforming the ‘observed’ into a form of order. A second posi- tion would maintain that participants and analysts view the world in the same way, through the same lens, using the same coding devices – very much in the hermeneutic, ethnomethodological mode of inquiry. Here the assumption is one of similarity demanding that both perspectives need to be aligned in any study of social events. (2001: 369) 282 Christopher N. Candlin / Jonathan Crichton Determining which of

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and foreign language learning through a variety of peer-to-peer technologies (Thomas 2009). Indeed, as Carney (2006) recognised, Web 2.0 tools seem to have considerable potential in a telecollaborative context to build on the previous generation of CMC technologies. The new Web is much more concerned with the “link- ing of people” than the “linking of information” (Warschauer and Grimes 2007: 2). This potential is increasingly evident in recent re- search on social networking software (Boyd 2006, 2007) as well as 3D virtual worlds such as Second Life (see

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advertising. O’shaughnessy (2004) enumerates two major types of such shields, namely ex- ternal and internal. The former includes “people’s social attachments to culture, reference groups, social class and emotionally grounded experiences;” (p.8). The latter is about “people’s overall perspective or view of the world, tied to some constellation of interrelated beliefs, values, emotions and expectancies about themselves and their social world.”. Despite these, advertising unfailingly makes every endeavour to let the target group, whose perspective is originally

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. 157 Forthcoming. Vol. 158 Bárbara Eizaga Rebollar (ed.) Studies in Linguistics and Cognition. 301 pages. 2012. ISBN 978-3-0343-1138-0 Vol. 159 Giuliana Garzone, Paola Catenaccio, Chiara Degano (eds) Genre Change in the Contemporary World. Short-term Diachronic Perspectives. 329 pages. 2012. ISBN 978-3-0343-1214-1 Vol. 160 Carol Berkenkotter, Vijay K. Bhatia & Maurizio Gotti (eds) Insights into Academic Genres. 468 pages. 2012. ISBN 978-3-0343-1211-0 Vol. 161 Forthcoming. Vol. 162 Patrizia Anesa Jury Trials and the Popularization of Legal Language. A

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of the goals de- scribed above. A top executive from the company which provides the data used in this study had this to say about contemporary evolutions in communications and corporate objectives with reference to finan- cial disclosures: Multimodal, Virtual Professional Space 173 The biggest shift in the corporate world regarding sharing the financials is the move away from annual and quarterly ‘snapshots’, looking back using written communications such as annual reports, memos, website communications, and into the audio-visual world. People like to see

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. Oxford,UK: Blackwell. Heracleous, L. / Hendrey, J. (2000). Discourse and the Study of Organization: Toward a Structural Perspective. Human Relations, 53, 10, 251-286. Ho, J. (1997). Evaluating the World Wide Web: A Global Study of Commercial Sites. Journal o f Computer-mediated Communication, 3, 1, available at: www.ascusc.org/jcmc/vol3/issue1/. Hodge, R. / Kress, G. (1988). Social Semiotics. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Hodgson, G. (1998). Competence and Contract in the Theory of the Firm, Jour­ nal o f Behavior & Organization, 35, 179-201. Hoey, M. (1983

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obsessive troll- ing tactic), are referenced directly and frequently. This suggests that the Trump’s ‘online rally’ consciously and purposefully engaged in these practices with the goal to cause disruption. From a community-oriented perspective, group membership seems to be graded; the virtual commu- nity is seen by its members as the core of a much broader movement that is also active offline. This means that while Trump supporters who are not Redditors are acknowledged as members of community of interest and value, they are not part of the core community on the

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, this chapter aims to identify the main factors involved in genre change in the contemporary world, looking at how variables associated with the various participants and contex- tual factors interact and consequently cause genres to change or diver- sify in time, or determine the rise of new ones. 1.2. Genre and change In the by now extensive literature on genre in non-literary domains, research has often focused on the inherent dynamism of genres, with- out however paying specific attention to the mechanisms involved in evolution. For instance, when

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This case study describes the evolution of the Virtual Harlem Project and the efforts of those involved to build community, foster cross- cultural interaction and to encourage interdisciplinary collaboration. Virtual Harlem has been in existence in various forms since 1997, but its transfer into the virtual world of Second Life (SL) has allowed a level of engagement not possible in the original version, offering fac- ulty, students and residents of SL the opportunity and an environment in which they can interact with one another and with historic content

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Awakens]), the poet speaks of “e wind in end- less jargon”. My translation of the title could be described as transcreational in Haroldo de Campos’ (1963) sense of the term. In its departure from the literal “Hagar [Listens to/Hears/Heeds] the Cries”, an ellipsis that may indicate ap- proaching dawn or approaching danger, the English version of the title takes a step into the situated present to release, as does Dib’s retelling of the story, contemporary narratives that challenge cultural perspectives, past and present, of this ancient Biblical story.4 Hagar aux